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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 10.515-10.542
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omnia sunt oculis, mensae, quas advena primasFirst in his path was Lagus, thither led


tunc adiit, dextraeque datae. Sulmone creatosby evil stars; whom, as he tried to lift


quattuor hic iuvenes, totidem, quos educat Ufensa heavy stone, the shaft of Pallas pierced


viventis rapit, inferias quos immolet umbriswhere ribs and spine divide: backward he drew


captivoque rogi perfundat sanguine flammas.the clinging spear; But Hisbo from above


Inde Mago procul infensam contenderat hastam.urprised him not, though meaning it; for while


Ille astu subit ac tremibunda supervolat hasta(In anger blind for friend unpitying slain)


et genua amplectens effatur talia supplex:at Pallas' face he flew:—he, standing firm


Per patrios manis et spes surgentis Iuliplunged deep into that swelling breast the sword.


te precor, hanc animam serves natoque patrique.Then Sthenius he slew; and next Anchemolus


Est domus alta, iacent penitus defossa talentaof Rhoetus' ancient line, who dared defile


caelati argenti, sunt auri pondera factihis step-dame's bridal bed. And also ye


infectique mihi. Non hic victoria Teucrumfair Thymber and Larides, Daucus' twins


vertitur aut anima una dabit discrimina tanta.fell on that Rutule field; so like were ye


Dixerat. Aeneas contra cui talia reddit:your own kin scarce discerned, and parents proud


Argenti atque auri memoras quae multa talentamiled at the dear deceit; but now in death


natis parce tuis. Belli commercia Turnuscruel unlikeness Pallas wrought; thy head


sustulit ista prior iam tum Pallante perempto.fell, hapless Thymber, by Evander's sword;


Hoc patris Anchisae manes, hoc sentit Iulus.and thy right hand, Larides, shorn away


Sic fatus galeam laeva tenet atque reflexaeemed feeling for its Iord; the fingers cold


cervice orantis capulo tenus applicat ensem.clutched, trembling, at the sword. Now all the troop


Nec procul Haemonides, Phoebi Triviaeque sacerdosof Arcady, their chief's great action seen


infula cui sacra redimibat tempora vittaand by his warning roused, made at their foes


totus conlucens veste atque insignibus armis.purred on by grief and shame. Next Pallas pierced


Quem congressus agit campo lapsumque superstansthe flying Rhoetus in his car; this gained


immolat ingentique umbra tegit; arma Serestusfor Ilus respite and delay, for him


lecta refert umeris, tibi, rex Gradive, tropaeum.the stout spear aimed at; but its flight was stopped


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 16.419-16.420, 16.422, 16.426-16.507, 20.419-20.454 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

16.419. /Thereafter Erymas and Amphoterus, and Epaltes, and Tlepolemus, son of Damastor, and Echius and Pyris, and Ipheus and Evippus, and Polymelus, son of Argeas, all these one after another he brought down to the bounteous earth.But when Sarpedon saw his comrades, that wear the tunic ungirt 16.420. /being laid low beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius, he called aloud, upbraiding the godlike Lycians:Shame, ye Lycians, whither do ye flee? Now be ye swift to fight; for I myself will meet this man, that I may know who he is that prevaileth here, and verily hath wrought the Trojans much mischief 16.422. /being laid low beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius, he called aloud, upbraiding the godlike Lycians:Shame, ye Lycians, whither do ye flee? Now be ye swift to fight; for I myself will meet this man, that I may know who he is that prevaileth here, and verily hath wrought the Trojans much mischief 16.426. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.427. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.428. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.429. /seeing he hath loosed the knees of many men and goodly. He spake, and leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. And Patroclus, over against him, when he beheld him, sprang from his chariot. And as vultures crooked of talon and curved of beak fight with loud cries upom a high rock 16.430. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.431. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.432. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.433. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.434. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.435. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.436. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.437. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.438. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.439. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. Then ox-eyed queenly Hera answered him: 16.440. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.441. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.442. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.443. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.444. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.445. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.446. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.447. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.448. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.449. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.450. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.451. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.452. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.453. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.454. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.455. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.456. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.457. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.458. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.459. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.460. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.461. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.462. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.463. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.464. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.465. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.466. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.467. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.468. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.469. /him he smote on the lower belly, and loosed his limbs. But Sarpedon missed him with his bright spear, as in turn he got upon him, but smote with his spear the horse Pedasus on the right shoulder; and the horse shrieked aloud as he gasped forth his life, and down he fell in the dust with a moan, and his spirit flew from him. 16.470. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.471. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.472. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.473. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.474. /But the other twain reared this way and that, and the yoke creaked, and above them the reins were entangled, when the trace-horse lay low in the dust. Howbeit for this did Automedon, famed for his spear, find him a remedy; drawing his long sword from beside his stout thigh, he sprang forth and cut loose the trace-horse, and faltered not 16.475. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.476. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.477. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.478. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. 16.479. /and the other two were righted, and strained at the reins; and the two warriors came together again in soul-devouring strife. Then again Sarpedon missed with his bright spear, and over the left shoulder of Patroclus went the point of the spear and smote him not. 16.480. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.481. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.482. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.483. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.484. /But Patroclus in turn rushed on with the bronze, and not in vain did the shaft speed from his hand, but smote his foe where the midriff is set close about the throbbing heart. And he fell as an oak falls, or a poplar, or a tall pine, that among the mountains shipwrights fell with whetted axes to be a ship's timber; 16.485. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.486. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.487. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.488. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.489. /even so before his horses and chariot he lay outstretched, moaning aloud and clutching at the bloody dust. And as a lion cometh into the midst of a herd and slayeth a bull, tawny and high of heart amid the kine of trailing gait, and with a groan he perisheth beneath the jaws of the lion; 16.490. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.491. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.492. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.493. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.494. /even so beneath Patroclus did the leader of the Lycian shieldmen struggle in death; and he called by name his dear comrade:Dear Glaucus, warrior amid men of war, now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior; now be evil war thy heart's desire if indeed thou art swift to fight. 16.495. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.496. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.497. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.498. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.499. /First fare thou up and down everywhere, and urge on the leaders of the Lycians to fight for Sarpedon, and thereafter thyself do battle with the bronze in my defence. For to thee even in time to come shall I be a reproach and a hanging of the head, all thy days continually 16.500. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.501. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.502. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.503. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.504. /if so be the Achaeans shall spoil me of my armour, now that I am fallen amid the gathering of the ships. Nay, hold thy ground valiantly, and urge on all the host. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him, his eyes alike and his nostrils; and Patroclus, setting his foot upon his breast, drew the spear from out the flesh, and the midriff followed therewith; 16.505. /and at the one moment he drew forth the spear-point and the soul of Sarpedon. And the Myrmidons stayed there the snorting horses, that were fain to flee now that they had left the chariot of their lords. 16.506. /and at the one moment he drew forth the spear-point and the soul of Sarpedon. And the Myrmidons stayed there the snorting horses, that were fain to flee now that they had left the chariot of their lords. 16.507. /and at the one moment he drew forth the spear-point and the soul of Sarpedon. And the Myrmidons stayed there the snorting horses, that were fain to flee now that they had left the chariot of their lords. 20.419. /were fastened, and the corselet overlapped; through this straight on its way beside the navel passed the spear-point, and he fell to his knees with a groan and a cloud of darkness enfolded him, and as he sank he clasped his bowels to him with his hands. But when Hector beheld his brother Polydorus 20.420. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.421. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.422. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.423. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.424. /clasping his bowels in his hand and sinking to earth, down over his eyes a mist was shed, nor might he longer endure to range apart, but strode against Achilles, brandishing his sharp spear, in fashion like a flame. But when Achilles beheld him, even then sprang he up and spake vauntingly: 20.425. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.426. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.427. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.428. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.429. / Lo, nigh is the man, that above all hath stricken me to the heart, for that he slew the comrade I honoured. Not for long shall we any more shrink one from the other along the dykes of war. He said, and with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto goodly Hector:Draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. 20.430. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.431. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.432. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.433. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.434. /But with no touch of fear, spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Son of Peleus, think not with words to affright me, as I were a child, seeing I know well of myself to utter taunts and withal speech that is seemly. I know that thou art valiant, and I am weaker far than thou. 20.435. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.436. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.437. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.438. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.439. /Yet these things verily lie on the knees of the gods, whether I,albeit the weaker, shall rob thee of life with a cast of my spear; for my missile too hath been found keen ere now. He spake, and poised his spear and hurled it, but Athene with a breath turned it back from glorious Achilles 20.440. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.441. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.442. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.443. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.444. /breathing full lightly; and it came back to goodly Hector, and fell there before his feet. But Achilles leapt upon him furiously, fain to slay him, crying a terrible cry. But Apollo snatched up Hector full easily, as a god may, and shrouded him in thick mist. 20.445. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.446. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.447. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.448. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.449. /Thrice then did swift-footed, goodly Achilles heap upon him with spear of bronze, and thrice he smote the thick mist. But when for the fourth time he rushed upon him like a god, then with a terrible cry he spake to him winged words:Now again, thou dog, art thou escaped from death, though verily 20.450. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.451. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.452. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.453. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon. 20.454. /thy bane came nigh thee; but once more hath Phoebus Apollo saved thee, to whom of a surety thou must make prayer, whenso thou goest amid the hurtling of spears. Verily I will yet make an end of thee, when I meet thee hereafter, if so be any god is helper to me likewise. But now will I make after others, whomsoever I may light upon.
2. Ovid, Fasti, 6.473-6.572, 6.582, 6.589-6.596, 6.609-6.610, 6.613-6.648 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.473. Now you complain, Phrygian Tithonus, abandoned by your bride 6.474. And the vigilant Morning Star leaves the Eastern waters. 6.475. Good mothers (since the Matralia is your festival) 6.476. Go, offer the Theban goddess the golden cakes she’s owed. 6.477. Near the bridges and mighty Circus is a famous square 6.478. One that takes its name from the statue of an ox: 6.479. There, on this day, they say, Servius with his own 6.480. Royal hands, consecrated a temple to Mother Matruta. 6.481. Bacchus, whose hair is twined with clustered grapes 6.482. If the goddess’ house is also yours, guide the poet’s work 6.483. Regarding who the goddess is, and why she exclude 6.484. (Since she does) female servants from the threshold 6.485. of her temple, and why she calls for toasted cakes. 6.486. Semele was burnt by Jove’s compliance: Ino 6.487. Received you as a baby, and nursed you with utmost care. 6.488. Juno swelled with rage, that Ino should raise a child 6.489. Snatched from Jove’s lover: but it was her sister’s son. 6.490. So Athamas was haunted by the Furies, and false visions 6.491. And little Learchus died by his father’s hand. 6.492. His grieving mother committed his shade to the tomb. 6.493. And paid the honours due to the sad pyre. 6.494. Then tearing her hair in sorrow, she leapt up 6.495. And snatched you from your cradle, Melicertes. 6.496. There’s a narrow headland between two seas 6.497. A single space attacked by twofold waves: 6.498. There Ino came, clutching her son in her frenzied grasp 6.499. And threw herself, with him, from a high cliff into the sea. 6.500. Panope and her hundred sisters received them unharmed 6.501. And gliding smoothly carried them through their realm. 6.502. They reached the mouth of densely eddying Tiber 6.503. Before they became Leucothea and Palaemon. 6.504. There was a grove: known either as Semele’s or Stimula’s: 6.505. Inhabited, they say, by Italian Maenads. 6.506. Ino, asking them their nation, learned they were Arcadians 6.507. And that Evander was the king of the place. 6.508. Hiding her divinity, Saturn’s daughter cleverly 6.509. Incited the Latian Bacchae with deceiving words: 6.510. ‘O too-easy-natured ones, caught by every feeling! 6.511. This stranger comes, but not as a friend, to our gathering. 6.512. She’s treacherous, and would learn our sacred rites: 6.513. But she has a child on whom we can wreak punishment.’ 6.514. She’d scarcely ended when the Thyiads, hair streaming 6.515. Over their necks, filled the air with their howling 6.516. Laid hands on Ino, and tried to snatch the boy. 6.517. She invoked gods with names as yet unknown to her: 6.518. ‘Gods, and men, of this land, help a wretched mother!’ 6.519. Her cry carried to the neighbouring Aventine. 6.520. Oetaean Hercules having driven the Iberian cattle 6.521. To the riverbank, heard and hurried towards the voice. 6.522. As he arrived, the women who’d been ready for violence 6.523. Shamefully turned their backs in cowardly flight. 6.524. ‘What are you doing here,’ said Hercules (recognising her) 6.525. ‘Sister of Bacchus’ mother? Does Juno persecute you too?’ 6.526. She told him part of her tale, suppressing the rest because of her son: 6.527. Ashamed to have been goaded to crime by the Furies. 6.528. Rumour, so swift, flew on beating wings 6.529. And your name was on many a lip, Ino. 6.530. It’s said you entered loyal Carmentis’ home 6.531. As a guest, and assuaged your great hunger: 6.532. They say the Tegean priestess quickly made cake 6.533. With her own hands, and baked them on the hearth. 6.534. Now cakes delight the goddess at the Matralia: 6.535. Country ways pleased her more than art’s attentions. 6.536. ‘Now, O prophetess,’ she said, ‘reveal my future fate 6.537. As far as is right. Add this, I beg, to your hospitality.’ 6.538. A pause ensued. Then the prophetess assumed divine powers 6.539. And her whole breast filled with the presence of the god: 6.540. You’d hardly have known her then, so much taller 6.541. And holier she’d become than a moment before. 6.542. ‘I sing good news, Ino,’ she said, ‘your trials are over 6.543. Be a blessing to your people for evermore. 6.544. You’ll be a sea goddess, and your son will inhabit ocean. 6.545. Take different names now, among your own waves: 6.546. Greeks will call you Leucothea, our people Matuta: 6.547. Your son will have complete command of harbours 6.548. We’ll call him Portunus, Palaemon in his own tongue. 6.549. Go, and both be friends, I beg you, of our country!’ 6.550. Ino nodded, and gave her promise. Their trials were over 6.551. They changed their names: he’s a god and she’s a goddess. 6.552. You ask why she forbids the approach of female servants? 6.553. She hates them: by her leave I’ll sing the reason for her hate. 6.554. Daughter of Cadmus, one of your maid 6.555. Was often embraced by your husband. 6.556. Faithless Athamas secretly enjoyed her: he learned 6.557. From her that you gave the farmers parched seed. 6.558. You yourself denied it, but rumour confirmed it. 6.559. That’s why you hate the service of a maid. 6.560. But let no loving mother pray to her, for her child: 6.561. She herself proved an unfortunate parent. 6.562. Better command her to help another’s child: 6.563. She was more use to Bacchus than her own. 6.564. They say she asked you, Rutilius, ‘Where are you rushing? 6.565. As consul you’ll fall to the Marsian enemy on my day.’ 6.566. Her words were fulfilled, the Tolenu 6.567. Flowed purple, its waters mixed with blood. 6.568. The following year, Didius, killed on the same 6.569. Day, doubled the enemy’s strength. 6.570. Fortuna, the same day is yours, your temple 6.571. Founded by the same king, in the same place. 6.572. And whose is that statue hidden under draped robes? 6.582. Under cloth: the king’s face being covered by a robe. 6.589. Having secured her marriage by crime, Tullia 6.590. Used to incite her husband with words like these: 6.591. ‘What use if we’re equally matched, you by my sister’ 6.592. Murder, I by your brother’s, in leading a virtuous life? 6.593. Better that my husband and your wife had lived 6.594. Than that we shrink from greater achievement. 6.595. I offer my father’s life and realm as my dower: 6.596. If you’re a man, go take the dower I speak of. 6.609. ‘Go on, or do you seek the bitter fruits of virtue? 6.610. Drive the unwilling wheels, I say, over his face.’ 6.613. Yet she still dared to visit her father’s temple 6.614. His monument: what I tell is strange but true. 6.615. There was a statue enthroned, an image of Servius: 6.616. They say it put a hand to its eyes 6.617. And a voice was heard: ‘Hide my face 6.618. Lest it view my own wicked daughter.’ 6.619. It was veiled by cloth, Fortune refused to let the robe 6.620. Be removed, and she herself spoke from her temple: 6.621. ‘The day when Servius’ face is next revealed 6.622. Will be a day when shame is cast aside.’ 6.623. Women, beware of touching the forbidden cloth 6.624. (It’s sufficient to utter prayers in solemn tones) 6.625. And let him who was the City’s seventh king 6.626. Keep his head covered, forever, by this veil. 6.627. The temple once burned: but the fire spared 6.628. The statue: Mulciber himself preserved his son. 6.629. For Servius’ father was Vulcan, and the lovely 6.630. Ocresia of Corniculum his mother. 6.631. Once, performing sacred rites with her in the due manner 6.632. Tanaquil ordered her to pour wine on the garlanded hearth: 6.633. There was, or seemed to be, the form of a male organ 6.634. In the ashes: the shape was really there in fact. 6.635. The captive girl sat on the hearth, as commanded: 6.636. She conceived Servius, born of divine seed. 6.637. His father showed his paternity by touching the child’ 6.638. Head with fire, and a cap of flames glowed on his hair. 6.639. And Livia, this day dedicated a magnificent shrine to you 6.640. Concordia, that she offered to her dear husband. 6.641. Learn this, you age to come: where Livia’s Colonnade 6.642. Now stands, there was once a vast palace. 6.643. A site that was like a city: it occupied a space 6.644. Larger than that of many a walled town. 6.645. It was levelled to the soil, not because of its owner’s treason 6.646. But because its excess was considered harmful. 6.647. Caesar counteced the demolition of such a mass 6.648. Destroying its great wealth to which he was heir.
3. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.6-2.8, 2.29, 8.154-8.174, 8.513-8.519, 9.342-9.343, 9.762, 10.41-10.44, 10.427, 10.429, 10.431-10.433, 10.435-10.436, 10.439, 10.442, 10.464-10.473, 10.513, 10.516-10.542, 10.545, 10.552, 10.554-10.560, 10.562, 10.564-10.570, 10.581-10.582, 10.604, 11.5, 11.18, 11.29, 11.41-11.49, 11.51-11.58, 11.96-11.97, 11.179, 11.181 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.6. how Asia 's glory and afflicted throne 2.7. the Greek flung down; which woeful scene I saw 2.8. and bore great part in each event I tell. 2.29. and opulent, ere Priam's kingdom fell 8.154. flew forward to a bit of rising ground 8.155. and cried from far: “Hail, warriors! what cause 8.156. drives you to lands unknown, and whither bound? 8.157. Your kin, your country? Bring ye peace or war?” 8.158. Father Aeneas then held forth a bough 8.159. of peaceful olive from the lofty ship 8.160. thus answering : “Men Trojan-born are we 8.161. foes of the Latins, who have driven us forth 8.162. with insolent assault. We fain would see 8.163. Evander. Pray, deliver this, and say 8.164. that chosen princes of Dardania 8.165. ue for his help in arms.” So wonder fell 8.166. on Pallas, awestruck at such mighty name. 8.167. O, come, whoe'er thou art,” he said, “and speak 8.168. in presence of my father. Enter here 8.169. guest of our hearth and altar.” He put forth 8.170. his right hand in true welcome, and they stood 8.171. with lingering clasp; then hand in hand advanced 8.173. Aeneas to Evander speaking fair 8.174. these words essayed: “O best of Grecian-born! 8.513. Behold what tribes conspire, what cities strong 8.514. behind barred gates now make the falchion keen 8.515. to ruin and blot out both me and mine!” 8.516. So spake the goddess, as her arms of snow 8.517. around her hesitating spouse she threw 8.518. in tender, close embrace. He suddenly 8.519. knew the familiar fire, and o'er his frame 9.342. where we have hunted all day long and know 9.343. each winding of yon river.” Then uprose 9.762. the shining swords looked thickest, there he sprung. 10.41. unblest and unapproved the Trojans came 10.42. to Italy, for such rebellious crime 10.43. give them their due, nor lend them succor, thou 10.44. with thy strong hand! But if they have obeyed 10.427. the sword drove deep, and gored the gaping side. 10.429. ripped in her dying hour, and unto thee 10.431. escaped the fatal steel. Hard by him fell 10.432. tout Cisseus and gigantic Gyas; these 10.433. to death were hurled, while with their knotted clubs 10.435. Herculean weapons, nor their mighty hands 10.436. or that Melampus was their sire, a peer 10.439. But while he vainly raves, the whirling spear 10.442. while following in ill-omened haste the steps 10.464. Then from his brother's body Numitor 10.465. the weapon plucked and hurled it, furious 10.466. upon Aeneas; but it could not strike 10.467. the hero's self, and grazed along the thigh 10.468. of great Achates. Next into the fight 10.469. Clausus of Cures came, in youthful bloom 10.470. exulting, and with far-thrown javelin 10.471. truck Dryops at the chin, and took away 10.472. from the gashed, shrieking throat both life and voice; 10.473. the warrior's fallen forehead smote the dust; 10.513. yon lands are all too small. Ha! Shall we steer 10.516. First in his path was Lagus, thither led 10.517. by evil stars; whom, as he tried to lift 10.518. a heavy stone, the shaft of Pallas pierced 10.519. where ribs and spine divide: backward he drew 10.520. the clinging spear; But Hisbo from above 10.521. urprised him not, though meaning it; for while 10.522. (In anger blind for friend unpitying slain) 10.523. at Pallas' face he flew:—he, standing firm 10.524. plunged deep into that swelling breast the sword. 10.525. Then Sthenius he slew; and next Anchemolus 10.526. of Rhoetus' ancient line, who dared defile 10.527. his step-dame's bridal bed. And also ye 10.528. fair Thymber and Larides, Daucus' twins 10.529. fell on that Rutule field; so like were ye 10.530. your own kin scarce discerned, and parents proud 10.531. miled at the dear deceit; but now in death 10.532. cruel unlikeness Pallas wrought; thy head 10.533. fell, hapless Thymber, by Evander's sword; 10.534. and thy right hand, Larides, shorn away 10.535. eemed feeling for its Iord; the fingers cold 10.536. clutched, trembling, at the sword. Now all the troop 10.537. of Arcady, their chief's great action seen 10.538. and by his warning roused, made at their foes 10.539. purred on by grief and shame. Next Pallas pierced 10.540. the flying Rhoetus in his car; this gained 10.541. for Ilus respite and delay, for him 10.542. the stout spear aimed at; but its flight was stopped 10.545. Teuthras and Tyres: from his car he rolled 10.552. grim Vulcan's serried flames; from some high seat 10.554. ees, glad at heart, his own victorious fires: 10.555. o now fierce valor spreads, uniting all 10.556. in one confederate rage, 'neath Pallas' eyes. 10.557. But the fierce warrior Halaesus next 10.558. led on the charge, behind his skilful shield 10.559. close-crouching. Ladon and Demodocus 10.560. and Pheres he struck down; his glittering blade 10.562. heer off; with one great stone he crushed the brows 10.564. bones, brains, and gore. Halaesus' prophet-sire 10.565. foreseeing doom, had hid him in dark groves; 10.566. but when the old man's fading eyes declined 10.567. in death, the hand of Fate reached forth and doomed 10.568. the young life to Evander's sword; him now 10.569. Pallas assailed, first offering this prayer: 10.570. “O Father Tiber, give my poising shaft 10.581. himself the sticking-point and tug of war. 10.582. Down went Arcadia 's warriors, and slain 10.604. looked upon Turnus, glancing up and down 11.5. for reward to his gods, a conqueror's vow 11.18. our largest work is done. Bid fear begone 11.29. our comrades fallen; for no honor else 11.41. under less happy omens set to guard 11.42. his darling child. Around him is a throng 11.43. of slaves, with all the Trojan multitude 11.44. and Ilian women, who the wonted way 11.45. let sorrow's tresses loosely flow. When now 11.46. Aeneas to the lofty doors drew near 11.47. all these from smitten bosoms raised to heaven 11.48. a mighty moaning, till the King's abode 11.49. was loud with anguish. There Aeneas viewed 11.51. the smooth young breast that bore the gaping wound 11.52. of that Ausonian spear, and weeping said: 11.53. “Did Fortune's envy, smiling though she came 11.54. refuse me, hapless boy, that thou shouldst see 11.55. my throne established, and victorious ride 11.56. beside me to thy father's house? Not this 11.57. my parting promise to thy King and sire 11.58. Evander, when with friendly, fond embrace 11.96. the sad prince o'er the youthful body threw 11.97. for parting gift; and with the other veiled 11.181. to King Evander hied, Evander's house


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, arms of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, death of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, deceived by apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, greatest of greek warriors Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, kills hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, responsible for the fall of troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles, successors, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, successors, ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, successors, turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
achilles, successors Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
aeneas, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
aeneas, intertextual identities, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
aeneas, memory of troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
agenor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
ajax son of telamon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
anger, epicurean view Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
anger, stoic view Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
aristotle, definition of anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 224
arms (arma) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
carmentis Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
choice Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
death, of pallas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
death, of patroclus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
death, of sarpedon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
dolopians Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
epic poetry, roman Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
epicurean philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
euryalus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
evander Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 224; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
failure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
fortuna Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 224
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
greek literature and practice, ino story, romanization of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
grief Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
hatred, and grief Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
hellenistic philosophy, ideas about anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
honor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
intertextuality Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
jackson knight, w. f. Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
jupiter Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
liminality' Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
livia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
love, and grief Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
matralia and cult of mater matuta, foundational agenda of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
matralia and cult of mater matuta, hospitality in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
matralia and cult of mater matuta, romanizatin of ino story Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
matralia and cult of mater matuta, vergils aeneid, as alternative foundation narrative to Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
matralia and cult of mater matuta Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
memory, remembering, etc. Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
myrmidons Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
narrators, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
objective attitudes Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
pallas, death of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
pallas, son of evander, death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
pallas, son of evander, intertextual identity, as iliadic sarpedon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
pallas, son of evander, intertextual identity, patroclus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
pallas, son of evander Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
pallas (son of evander) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
patroclus, death of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
patroclus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
peripatetic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
prophecy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
pyrrhus/neoptolemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
rationality, reactive attitudes Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
revenge, and aeneas Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
sarpedon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
seneca, view of anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
stoic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
sublimity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
time, heroic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
troy, sack (fall, destruction) of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
turnus, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223
turnus, breaking of treaty Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224
turnus, intertextual identity, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
turnus, intertextual identity, hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
turnus, intertextual identity Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 267
ulysses Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
vergil, aeneid, ancient scholarship on Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200
vergil, aeneid, hospitality in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 200, 267
vergil, aeneid, matralia as alternative foundation narrative to Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 199
virgil, and hellenistic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 223, 224