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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11092
Vergil, Aeneis, 10.495-10.506


hospitia. Et laevo pressit pede talia fatuswho also for the roughness of the ground


exanimem, rapiens immania pondera balteiwere all unmounted: he (the last resource


impressumque nefas, una sub nocte iugaliof men in straits) to wild entreaty turned


caesa manus iuvenum foede thalamique cruentiand taunts, enkindling their faint hearts anew:


quae Clonus Eurytides multo caelaverat auro;“Whither, my men! O, by your own brave deeds


quo nunc Turnus ovat spolio gaudetque potitus.O, by our lord Evander's happy wars


Nescia mens hominum fati sortisque futuraethe proud hopes I had to make my name


et servare modum, rebus sublata secundis!a rival glory,—think not ye can fly!


Turno tempus erit, magno cum optaverit emptumYour swords alone can carve ye the safe way


intactum Pallanta et cum spolia ista diemquetraight through your foes. Where yonder warrior-throng


oderit. At socii multo gemitu lacrimisqueis fiercest, thickest, there and only there


impositum scuto referunt Pallanta frequentes.your Country's honor calls for men like you


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.1210-1.1211 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.1210. ὀτραλέως κατὰ κόσμον ἐπαρτίσσειεν ἰόντι. 1.1211. δὴ γάρ μιν τοίοισιν ἐν ἤθεσιν αὐτὸς ἔφερβεν
2. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.450-1.493, 1.640-1.642, 5.250-5.257, 5.500-5.544, 6.14-6.41, 6.752-6.892, 7.177-7.191, 7.286-7.291, 7.789-7.792, 8.306-8.369, 8.608-8.731, 9.178-9.180, 9.197-9.198, 9.257-9.280, 10.427, 10.429, 10.431-10.433, 10.435-10.439, 10.442, 10.448, 10.454-10.456, 10.461, 10.467-10.468, 10.473, 10.496-10.506, 12.940-12.952 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.450. has crossed my path, thou maid without a name! 1.451. Thy beauty seems not of terrestrial mould 1.452. nor is thy music mortal! Tell me, goddess 1.453. art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph 1.454. the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art 1.455. thy favor we implore, and potent aid 1.456. in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies 1.457. or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! 1.458. Strange are these lands and people where we rove 1.459. compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand 1.461. Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.463. bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white 1.464. lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies 1.465. the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold 1.466. Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell 1.467. the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. 1.468. Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there 1.469. from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity 1.470. of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; 1.471. too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; 1.472. I trace the larger outline of her story: 1.473. Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad 1.474. no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed 1.475. by his ill-fated lady's fondest love 1.476. whose father gave him her first virgin bloom 1.477. in youthful marriage. But the kingly power 1.478. among the Tyrians to her brother came 1.479. Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime 1.480. in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose 1.481. a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch 1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 1.483. of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul 1.484. upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus 1.485. and at the very altar hewed him down. 1.486. Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully 1.487. deceived with false hopes, and empty words 1.488. her grief and stricken love. But as she slept 1.489. her husband's tombless ghost before her came 1.490. with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare 1.491. his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so 1.492. the blood-stained altar and the infamy 1.493. that darkened now their house. His counsel was 1.640. Aeneas paused, and, weeping, thus began: 1.641. “Alas, Achates, what far region now 1.642. what land in all the world knows not our pain? 5.250. have joyful hope enkindled in each heart 5.251. to pass the laggard Gyas. In the lead 5.252. Sergestus' ship shoots forth; and to the rock 5.253. runs boldly nigh; but not his whole long keel 5.254. may pass his rival; the projecting beak 5.255. is followed fast by Pristis' emulous prow. 5.256. Then, striding straight amidships through his crew 5.257. thus Mnestheus urged them on: “O Hector's friends! 5.500. he stood before Aeneas, and straightway 5.501. eized with his left hand the bull's golden horn 5.502. and cried, “O goddess-born, if no man dares 5.503. to risk him in this fight, how Iong delay? 5.504. how Iong beseems it I should stand and wait? 5.505. Bid me bear off my prize.” The Trojans all 5.506. murmured assent, and bade the due award 5.507. of promised gift. But with a brow severe 5.508. Acestes to Entellus at his side 5.509. addressed upbraiding words, where they reclined 5.510. on grassy bank and couch of pleasant green: 5.511. “O my Entellus, in the olden days 5.512. bravest among the mighty, but in vain! 5.513. Endurest thou to see yon reward won 5.514. without a blow? Where, prithee, is that god 5.515. who taught thee? Are thy tales of Eryx vain? 5.516. Does all Sicilia praise thee? Is thy roof 5.517. with trophies hung?” The other in reply: 5.518. “My jealous honor and good name yield not 5.519. to fear. But age, so cold and slow to move 5.520. makes my blood laggard, and my ebbing powers 5.521. in all my body are but slack and chill. 5.522. O, if I had what yonder ruffian boasts— 5.523. my own proud youth once more! I would not ask 5.524. the fair bull for a prize, nor to the lists 5.525. in search of gifts come forth.” So saying, he threw 5.526. into the mid-arena a vast pair 5.527. of ponderous gauntlets, which in former days 5.528. fierce Eryx for his fights was wont to bind 5.529. on hand and arm, with the stiff raw-hide thong. 5.530. All marvelled; for a weight of seven bulls' hides 5.531. was pieced with lead and iron. Dares stared 5.532. astonished, and step after step recoiled; 5.533. high-souled Anchises' son, this way and that 5.534. turned o'er the enormous coil of knots and thongs; 5.535. then with a deep-drawn breath the veteran spoke: 5.536. “O, that thy wondering eyes had seen the arms 5.537. of Hercules, and what his gauntlets were! 5.538. Would thou hadst seen the conflict terrible 5.539. upon this self-same shore! These arms were borne 5.540. by Eryx . Look; thy brother's!—spattered yet 5.541. with blood, with dashed-out brains! In these he stood 5.542. when he matched Hercules. I wore them oft 5.543. when in my pride and prime, ere envious age 5.544. hed frost upon my brows. But if these arms 6.14. The templed hill where lofty Phoebus reigns 6.15. And that far-off, inviolable shrine 6.16. of dread Sibylla, in stupendous cave 6.17. O'er whose deep soul the god of Delos breathes 6.18. Prophetic gifts, unfolding things to come. 6.20. Here Daedalus, the ancient story tells 6.21. Escaping Minos' power, and having made 6.22. Hazard of heaven on far-mounting wings 6.23. Floated to northward, a cold, trackless way 6.24. And lightly poised, at last, o'er Cumae 's towers. 6.25. Here first to earth come down, he gave to thee 6.26. His gear of wings, Apollo! and ordained 6.27. Vast temples to thy name and altars fair. 6.28. On huge bronze doors Androgeos' death was done; 6.29. And Cecrops' children paid their debt of woe 6.30. Where, seven and seven,—0 pitiable sight!— 6.31. The youths and maidens wait the annual doom 6.32. Drawn out by lot from yonder marble urn. 6.33. Beyond, above a sea, lay carven Crete :— 6.34. The bull was there; the passion, the strange guile; 6.35. And Queen Pasiphae's brute-human son 6.36. The Minotaur—of monstrous loves the sign. 6.37. Here was the toilsome, labyrinthine maze 6.38. Where, pitying love-lorn Ariadne's tears 6.39. The crafty Daedalus himself betrayed 6.40. The secret of his work; and gave the clue 6.41. To guide the path of Theseus through the gloom. 6.752. Came on my view; their hands made stroke at Heaven 6.753. And strove to thrust Jove from his seat on high. 6.754. I saw Salmoneus his dread stripes endure 6.755. Who dared to counterfeit Olympian thunder 6.756. And Jove's own fire. In chariot of four steeds 6.757. Brandishing torches, he triumphant rode 6.758. Through throngs of Greeks, o'er Elis ' sacred way 6.759. Demanding worship as a god. 0 fool! 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.767. Stretched o'er nine roods he lies; a vulture huge 6.768. Tears with hooked beak at his immortal side 6.769. Or deep in entrails ever rife with pain 6.770. Gropes for a feast, making his haunt and home 6.771. In the great Titan bosom; nor will give 6.772. To ever new-born flesh surcease of woe. 6.773. Why name Ixion and Pirithous 6.774. The Lapithae, above whose impious brows 6.775. A crag of flint hangs quaking to its fall 6.776. As if just toppling down, while couches proud 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.781. A flashing firebrand, with shrieks of woe. 6.782. Here in a prison-house awaiting doom 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 6.788. Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin 6.809. So spake Apollo's aged prophetess. 6.810. “Now up and on!” she cried. “Thy task fulfil! 6.811. We must make speed. Behold yon arching doors 6.812. Yon walls in furnace of the Cyclops forged! 6.813. 'T is there we are commanded to lay down 6.814. Th' appointed offering.” So, side by side 6.815. Swift through the intervening dark they strode 6.816. And, drawing near the portal-arch, made pause. 6.817. Aeneas, taking station at the door 6.818. Pure, lustral waters o'er his body threw 6.820. Now, every rite fulfilled, and tribute due 6.821. Paid to the sovereign power of Proserpine 6.822. At last within a land delectable 6.823. Their journey lay, through pleasurable bowers 6.824. of groves where all is joy,—a blest abode! 6.825. An ampler sky its roseate light bestows 6.826. On that bright land, which sees the cloudless beam 6.827. of suns and planets to our earth unknown. 6.828. On smooth green lawns, contending limb with limb 6.829. Immortal athletes play, and wrestle long 6.830. 'gainst mate or rival on the tawny sand; 6.831. With sounding footsteps and ecstatic song 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace, in flowing vesture clad 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody 6.835. Who sweeps the numbered strings with changeful hand 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 6.841. Their arms and shadowy chariots he views 6.842. And lances fixed in earth, while through the fields 6.843. Their steeds without a bridle graze at will. 6.844. For if in life their darling passion ran 6.845. To chariots, arms, or glossy-coated steeds 6.846. The self-same joy, though in their graves, they feel. 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.854. Who kept them undefiled their mortal day; 6.855. And poets, of whom the true-inspired song 6.856. Deserved Apollo's name; and all who found 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 6.858. Yea! here dwell all those dead whose deeds bequeath 6.859. Deserved and grateful memory to their kind. 6.860. And each bright brow a snow-white fillet wears. 6.861. Unto this host the Sibyl turned, and hailed 6.862. Musaeus, midmost of a numerous throng 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.887. In eager welcome, spread them swiftly forth. 6.888. Tears from his eyelids rained, and thus he spoke: 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 6.891. Will Heaven, beloved son, once more allow 6.892. That eye to eye we look? and shall I hear 7.177. in thunder spoke, and, with effulgent ray 7.178. from his ethereal tract outreaching far 7.179. hook visibly the golden-gleaming air. 7.180. Swift, through the concourse of the Trojans, spread 7.181. news of the day at hand when they should build 7.182. their destined walls. So, with rejoicing heart 7.183. at such vast omen, they set forth a feast 7.184. with zealous emulation, ranging well 7.186. Soon as the morrow with the lamp of dawn 7.187. looked o'er the world, they took their separate ways 7.188. exploring shore and towns; here spread the pools 7.189. and fountain of Numicius; here they see 7.190. the river Tiber, where bold Latins dwell. 7.191. Anchises' son chose out from his brave band 7.286. that lone wight hears whom earth's remotest isle 7.287. has banished to the Ocean's rim, or he 7.288. whose dwelling is the ample zone that burns 7.289. betwixt the changeful sun-god's milder realms 7.290. far severed from the world. We are the men 7.291. from war's destroying deluge safely borne 7.789. thy late and unavailing prayer shall rise. 7.790. Now was my time to rest. But as I come 7.791. close to my journey's end, thou spoilest me 7.792. of comfort in my death.” With this the King 8.306. rolling this way and that his wrathful eyes 8.307. gnashing his teeth. Three times his ire surveyed 8.308. the slope of Aventine ; three times he stormed 8.309. the rock-built gate in vain; and thrice withdrew 8.310. to rest him in the vale. But high above 8.311. a pointed peak arose, sheer face of rock 8.312. on every side, which towered into view 8.313. from the long ridge above the vaulted cave 8.314. fit haunt for birds of evil-boding wing. 8.315. This peak, which leftward toward the river leaned 8.316. he smote upon its right—his utmost blow — 8.317. breaking its bases Ioose; then suddenly 8.318. thrust at it: as he thrust, the thunder-sound 8.319. filled all the arching sky, the river's banks 8.320. asunder leaped, and Tiber in alarm 8.321. reversed his flowing wave. So Cacus' lair 8.322. lay shelterless, and naked to the day 8.323. the gloomy caverns of his vast abode 8.324. tood open, deeply yawning, just as if 8.325. the riven earth should crack, and open wide 8.326. th' infernal world and fearful kingdoms pale 8.327. which gods abhor; and to the realms on high 8.328. the measureless abyss should be laid bare 8.329. and pale ghosts shrink before the entering sun. 8.330. Now upon Cacus, startled by the glare 8.331. caged in the rocks and howling horribly 8.332. Alcides hurled his weapons, raining down 8.333. all sorts of deadly missiles—trunks of trees 8.334. and monstrous boulders from the mountain torn. 8.335. But when the giant from his mortal strait 8.336. no refuge knew, he blew from his foul jaws 8.337. a storm of smoke—incredible to tell — 8.338. and with thick darkness blinding every eye 8.339. concealed his cave, uprolling from below 8.340. one pitch-black night of mingled gloom and fire. 8.341. This would Alcides not endure, but leaped 8.342. headlong across the flames, where densest hung 8.343. the rolling smoke, and through the cavern surged 8.344. a drifting and impenetrable cloud. 8.345. With Cacus, who breathed unavailing flame 8.346. he grappled in the dark, locked limb with limb 8.347. and strangled him, till o'er the bloodless throat 8.348. the starting eyeballs stared. Then Hercules 8.349. burst wide the doorway of the sooty den 8.350. and unto Heaven and all the people showed 8.351. the stolen cattle and the robber's crimes 8.352. and dragged forth by the feet the shapeless corpse 8.353. of the foul monster slain. The people gazed 8.354. insatiate on the grewsome eyes, the breast 8.355. of bristling shag, the face both beast and man 8.356. and that fire-blasted throat whence breathed no more 8.357. the extinguished flame. 'T is since that famous day 8.358. we celebrate this feast, and glad of heart 8.359. each generation keeps the holy time. 8.360. Potitius began the worship due 8.361. and our Pinarian house is vowed to guard 8.362. the rites of Hercules. An altar fair 8.363. within this wood they raised; 't is called ‘the Great,’ 8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows 8.366. with garlands worthy of the gift of Heaven. 8.367. Lift high the cup in every thankful hand 8.368. and praise our people's god with plenteous wine.” 8.369. He spoke; and of the poplar's changeful sheen 8.608. ummoned Evander. From his couch arose 8.609. the royal sire, and o'er his aged frame 8.610. a tunic threw, tying beneath his feet 8.611. the Tuscan sandals: an Arcadian sword 8.612. girt at his left, was over one shoulder slung 8.613. his cloak of panther trailing from behind. 8.614. A pair of watch-dogs from the lofty door 8.615. ran close, their lord attending, as he sought 8.616. his guest Aeneas; for his princely soul 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 8.626. in safety stands, I call not Trojan power 8.627. vanquished or fallen. But to help thy war 8.628. my small means match not thy redoubled name. 8.629. Yon Tuscan river is my bound. That way 8.630. Rutulia thrusts us hard and chafes our wall 8.631. with loud, besieging arms. But I propose 8.632. to league with thee a numerous array 8.633. of kings and mighty tribes, which fortune strange 8.634. now brings to thy defence. Thou comest here 8.635. because the Fates intend. Not far from ours 8.636. a city on an ancient rock is seen 8.637. Agylla, which a warlike Lydian clan 8.638. built on the Tuscan hills. It prospered well 8.639. for many a year, then under the proud yoke 8.640. of King Mezentius it came and bore 8.641. his cruel sway. Why tell the loathsome deeds 8.642. and crimes unspeakable the despot wrought? 8.643. May Heaven requite them on his impious head 8.644. and on his children! For he used to chain 8.645. dead men to living, hand on hand was laid 8.646. and face on face,—torment incredible! 8.647. Till, locked in blood-stained, horrible embrace 8.648. a lingering death they found. But at the last 8.649. his people rose in furious despair 8.650. and while he blasphemously raged, assailed 8.651. his life and throne, cut down his guards 8.652. and fired his regal dwellings; he, the while 8.653. escaped immediate death and fied away 8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence 8.655. in Turnus hospitality. To-day 8.656. Etruria, to righteous anger stirred 8.657. demands with urgent arms her guilty King. 8.658. To their large host, Aeneas, I will give 8.659. an added strength, thyself. For yonder shores 8.660. re-echo with the tumult and the cry 8.661. of ships in close array; their eager lords 8.662. are clamoring for battle. But the song 8.663. of the gray omen-giver thus declares 8.664. their destiny: ‘O goodly princes born 8.665. of old Maeonian lineage! Ye that are 8.666. the bloom and glory of an ancient race 8.667. whom just occasions now and noble rage 8.668. enflame against Mezentius your foe 8.669. it is decreed that yonder nation proud 8.670. hall never submit to chiefs Italian-born. 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true. 9.178. of Phrygia 's boasted omens. What to me 9.179. their oracles from heaven? The will of Fate 9.180. and Venus have achieved their uttermost 9.197. Who follows me to cleave his deadly way 9.198. through yonder battlement, and leap like storm 9.257. the Rutuli in dull security 9.258. the siege maintain. Yet are their lights but few. 9.259. They are asleep or drunk, and in their line 9.260. is many a silent space. O, hear my thought 9.261. and what my heart is pondering. To recall 9.262. Aeneas is the dearest wish to-night 9.263. of all, both high and low. They need true men 9.264. to find him and bring tidings. If our chiefs 9.265. but grant me leave to do the thing I ask 9.266. (Claiming no reward save what honor gives) 9.267. methinks I could search out by yonder hill 9.268. a path to Pallanteum.” The amazed 9.269. Euryalus, flushed warm with eager love 9.270. for deeds of glory, instantly replied 9.271. to his high-hearted friend: “Dost thou refuse 9.272. my Nisus, to go with me hand in hand 9.273. when mighty deeds are done? Could I behold 9.274. thee venturing alone on danger? Nay! 9.275. Not thus my sire Opheltes, schooled in war 9.276. taught me his true child, 'mid the woes of Troy 9.277. and Argive terrors reared; not thus with thee 9.278. have I proved craven, since we twain were leal 9.279. to great Aeneas, sharing all his doom. 9.280. In this breast also is a heart which knows 10.427. the sword drove deep, and gored the gaping side. 10.429. ripped in her dying hour, and unto thee 10.431. escaped the fatal steel. Hard by him fell 10.432. tout Cisseus and gigantic Gyas; these 10.433. to death were hurled, while with their knotted clubs 10.435. Herculean weapons, nor their mighty hands 10.436. or that Melampus was their sire, a peer 10.437. of Hercules, what time in heavy toils 10.438. through earth he roved. See next how Pharon boasts! 10.439. But while he vainly raves, the whirling spear 10.442. while following in ill-omened haste the steps 10.448. a close array of seven, and seven spears 10.454. against yon Rutules, even as they pierced 10.455. the breasts of Greeks upon the Ilian plain.” 10.456. Then one great shaft he seized and threw; it sped 10.461. but through his arm a second skilful shaft 10.467. the hero's self, and grazed along the thigh 10.468. of great Achates. Next into the fight 10.473. the warrior's fallen forehead smote the dust; 10.496. were all unmounted: he (the last resource 10.497. of men in straits) to wild entreaty turned 10.498. and taunts, enkindling their faint hearts anew: 10.499. “Whither, my men! O, by your own brave deeds 10.500. O, by our lord Evander's happy wars 10.501. the proud hopes I had to make my name 10.502. a rival glory,—think not ye can fly! 10.503. Your swords alone can carve ye the safe way 10.504. traight through your foes. Where yonder warrior-throng 10.505. is fiercest, thickest, there and only there 10.506. your Country's honor calls for men like you 12.941. But Sire Aeneas, hearing Turnus' name 12.942. down the steep rampart from the citadel 12.943. unlingering tried, all lesser task laid by 12.944. with joy exultant and dread-thundering arms. 12.945. Like Athos ' crest he loomed, or soaring top 12.946. of Eryx, when the nodding oaks resound 12.947. or sovereign Apennine that lifts in air 12.948. his forehead of triumphant snow. All eyes 12.949. of Troy, Rutulia, and Italy 12.950. were fixed his way; and all who kept a guard 12.951. on lofty rampart, or in siege below 12.952. were battering the foundations, now laid by
5. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
6. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 3.183-3.185, 4.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, successors, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
actium, battle of ( Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
actium Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111
aeneas, experience Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas, hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas, intertextual identities, achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111, 112, 113, 114, 200
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112
apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
apollonius rhodius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
ascanius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
audiences, heterogeneity of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
authorial intention Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
autocracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
carthage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
catullus, poem Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 78
civil wars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111, 112
clemency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
clupeus virtutis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
copying, of behaviors Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 114
cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
daedalus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
danaids Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
divination/oracles Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 181
ecphrasis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
ekphrasis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
emotions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
epic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
ethical qualities, consistency Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
euryalus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
family Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 181
focalization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
gaze, in ekphrasis Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 78
gaze, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 78
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
hercules Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
hylas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
inconsistency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
indeterminacy, horace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111
indeterminacy, hypermnestra Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
intertextuality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
iulus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
juno, temple at carthage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
juno Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
marriage, weddings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
metaliterariness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111
mopsus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
morality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
myron Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111
myth Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
narrator, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 78
narrators, aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111
pallas, son of evander, baldric Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
parade of heroes Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
philostratus and callistratus, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 78
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
pompey Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
prophecy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
rape Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
reader response Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 113, 200
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
revisionary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114
seneca Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
sibyl Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111
sibyl of cumae Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
silvia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 113, 114
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111, 112, 113, 114
theocritus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 280
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
vengeance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111, 113
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 288
vergil Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111, 112, 113, 114
viewing, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 78
virgil, aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 78
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114, 200
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 114, 200
voice Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 113
women' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 111