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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11086
Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.91.1


nanWhile the pacification of the west was going on, in the east the Parthian king restored to Augustus the Roman standards which Orodes had taken at the time of Crassus' disaster, and those which his son Phraates had captured on the defeat of Antony. This title of Augustus was deservedly given him on the motion of Plancus with the unanimous acclaim of the entire senate and the Roman people. 2 Yet there were those who did not like this prosperous state of affairs. For example, Lucius Murena and Fannius Caepio had entered into a plot to assassinate Caesar, but were seized by state authority and themselves suffered by law what they had wished to accomplish by violence. They were two men quite diverse in character, for Murena, apart from this act, might have passed as a man of good character, while Caepio, even before this, had been of the worst. 3 Shortly afterwards a similar attempt was made by Rufus Egnatius, a man who in all respects resembled a gladiator rather than a senator. Securing the favour of the people in his aedileship by putting out fires with his own gang of slaves, he increased it daily to such an extent that the people gave him the praetorship immediately after the aedileship. It was not long before he dared to become a candidate for the consulship, but he was overwhelmed by the general knowledge of his shameless deeds and crimes, and the state of his property came to be as desperate as his mind. Therefore, collecting about him men of his own kind, he resolved to assassinate Caesar in order that he might die after getting rid of him whose existence was not compatible with his own. 4 Such men are so constituted that each would prefer to fall in a general cataclysm than to perish alone, and, though suffering the same fate in the end, to be less conspicuous in dying. He, however, was not more successful than the rest in concealing his designs, and after being thrust into prison with his fellow conspirators, died the death his life richly deserved.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

718b. the sequel of the laws themselves, partly by persuasion and partly (when men’s habits defy persuasion) by forcible and just chastisement, will render our State, with the concurrence of the gods, a blessed State and a prosperous. There are also matters which a lawgiver, if he shares my view, must necessarily regulate, though they are ill-suited for statement in the form of a law; in dealing with these he ought, in my opinion, to produce a sample for his own use and that of those
2. Cicero, Letters, 1.1.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Letters, 1.1.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Letters, 1.1.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Letters, 1.1.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Letters To Quintus, 1.1.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, Pro Archia, 21 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

21. Mithridaticum vero bellum magnum atque difficile et in multa varietate terra marique mari terraque G versatum totum ab hoc expressum est; qui libri non modo L. Lucullum, fortissimum et clarissimum virum, verum etiam populi Romani nomen inlustrant. populus enim Romanus aperuit Lucullo imperante Pontum et regiis quondam opibus et ipsa natura et natura et Mommsen : naturae (-ra eb χς ) codd. regione regionis b χς vallatum, populi Romani exercitus eodem duce non maxima manu innumerabilis Armeniorum copias fudit, populi Romani laus est urbem amicissimam Cyzicenorum eiusdem consilio ex omni impetu regio atque atque GEeb : ac cett. : atque e Halm totius belli ore ac faucibus ereptam esse atque servatam; nostra semper feretur et praedicabitur L. Lucullo dimicante, cum interfectis ducibus depressa hostium classis est est Heumann : et codd. , incredibilis apud Tenedum pugna illa navalis, nostra sunt tropaea, nostra monumenta, nostri triumphi. quae quae G1Ee : quia cett. ( G2 ) quorum ingeniis efferuntur efferuntur Görenz : haec (hec a ς bg ) feruntur codd. : ecferuntur Stürenberg , ab eis populi Romani fama celebratur.
8. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 1.2-1.3, 6.1, 34.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Augustus, 58.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 53.16.7-53.16.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

53.16.7.  For when they wished to call him by some distinctive title, and men were proposing one title and another and urging its selection, Caesar was exceedingly desirous of being called Romulus, but when he perceived that this caused him to be suspected of desiring the kingship 53.16.8.  he desisted from his efforts to obtain it, and took the title of "Augustus," signifying that he was more than human; for all the most precious and sacred objects are termed augusta. Therefore they addressed him also in Greek as Sebastos, meaning an august personage, from the passive of the verb sebazo, "to revere.
11. Epigraphy, Ogis, 458



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
ara pacis augustae Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
astronomical urban orientation Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
augustus, res gestae of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 145
augustus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
emotion Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
forum augusti Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
horologium augusti Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
legitimacy, of roman rule' Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 145
mausoleum augusti Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
pantheum (rome) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
plato Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 145
power structures, imperial power Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
rome Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
sacrifice Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
scheid, john Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
senses, and power structures Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226
senses, simmel, georges Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 226