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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11086
Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.45.5
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.5.127 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.35, 10.5, 34.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, Pompey, 36.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Tacitus, Annals, 6.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.28.  In the consulate of Paulus Fabius and Lucius Vitellius, after a long period of ages, the bird known as the phoenix visited Egypt, and supplied the learned of that country and of Greece with the material for long disquisitions on the miracle. I propose to state the points on which they coincide, together with the larger number that are dubious, yet not too absurd for notice. That the creature is sacred to the sun and distinguished from other birds by its head and the variegation of its plumage, is agreed by those who have depicted its form: as to its term of years, the tradition varies. The generally received number is five hundred; but there are some who assert that its visits fall at intervals of 1461 years, and that it was in the reigns, first of Sesosis, then of Amasis, and finally of Ptolemy (third of the Macedonian dynasty), that the three earlier phoenixes flew to the city called Heliopolis with a great escort of common birds amazed at the novelty of their appearance. But while antiquity is obscure, between Ptolemy and Tiberius there were less than two hundred and fifty years: whence the belief has been held that this was a spurious phoenix, not originating on the soil of Arabia, and following none of the practices affirmed by ancient tradition. For — so the tale is told — when its sum of years is complete and death is drawing on, it builds a nest in its own country and sheds on it a procreative influence, from which springs a young one, whose first care on reaching maturity is to bury his sire. Nor is that task performed at random, but, after raising a weight of myrrh and proving it by a far flight, so soon as he is a match for his burden and the course before him, he lifts up his father's corpse, conveys him to the Altar of the Sun, and consigns him to the flames. — The details are uncertain and heightened by fable; but that the bird occasionally appears in Egypt is unquestioned.
5. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 58.27.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

58.27.1.  And if Egyptian affairs touch Roman interests at all, it may be mentioned that the phoenix was seen that year. All these events were thought to foreshadow the death of Tiberius. Thrasyllus, indeed, did die at this very time, and the emperor himself died in the following spring, in the consulship of Gnaeus Proculus and Pontius Nigrinus.
6. Strabo, Geography, 12.3.11

12.3.11. Then one comes to Sinope itself, which is fifty stadia distant from Armene; it is the most noteworthy of the cities in that part of the world. This city was founded by the Milesians; and, having built a naval station, it reigned over the sea inside the Cyaneae, and shared with the Greeks in many struggles even outside the Cyaneae; and, although it was independent for a long time, it could not eventually preserve its freedom, but was captured by siege, and was first enslaved by Pharnaces and afterwards by his successors down to Eupator and to the Romans who overthrew Eupator. Eupator was both born and reared at Sinope; and he accorded it especial honor and treated it as the metropolis of his kingdom. Sinope is beautifully equipped both by nature and by human foresight, for it is situated on the neck of a peninsula, and has on either side of the isthmus harbors and roadsteads and wonderful pelamydes-fisheries, of which I have already made mention, saying that the Sinopeans get the second catch and the Byzantians the third. Furthermore, the peninsula is protected all round by ridgy shores, which have hollowed-out places in them, rock-cavities, as it were, which the people call choenicides; these are filled with water when the sea rises, and therefore the place is hard to approach, not only because of this, but also because the whole surface of the rock is prickly and impassable for bare feet. Higher up, however, and above the city, the ground is fertile and adorned with diversified market-gardens; and especially the suburbs of the city. The city itself is beautifully walled, and is also splendidly adorned with gymnasium and marked place and colonnades. But although it was such a city, still it was twice captured, first by Pharnaces, who unexpectedly attacked it all of a sudden, and later by Lucullus and by the tyrant who was garrisoned within it, being besieged both inside and outside at the same time; for, since Bacchides, who had been set up by the king as commander of the garrison, was always suspecting treason from the people inside, and was causing many outrages and murders, he made the people, who were unable either nobly to defend themselves or to submit by compromise, lose all heart for either course. At any rate, the city was captured; and though Lucullus kept intact the rest of the city's adornments, he took away the globe of Billarus and the work of Sthenis, the statue of Autolycus, whom they regarded as founder of their city and honored as god. The city had also an oracle of Autolycus. He is thought to have been one of those who went on the voyage with Jason and to have taken possession of this place. Then later the Milesians, seeing the natural advantages of the place and the weakness of its inhabitants, appropriated it to themselves and sent forth colonists to it. But at present it has received also a colony of Romans; and a part of the city and the territory belong to these. It is three thousand five hundred stadia distant from the Hieron, two thousand from Heracleia, and seven hundred from Carambis. It has produced excellent men: among the philosophers, Diogenes the Cynic and Timotheus Patrion; among the poets, Diphilus the comic poet; and, among the historians, Baton, who wrote the work entitled The Persica.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
a roman amateur Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 57
antoninus pius,column of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
aphrodite Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
authentic versus copy,ignorance of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 57
autolycus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
autonomy,personal,and integrity Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
billarus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
cato the younger,nan Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147, 148
cato the younger Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147, 148
corinthian bronze Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
cornelius lentulus (marcellinus),(gnaeus) Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147
cornelius valerianus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 57
delos,ware from Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
fastidium,and integritas Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
folktale,idealizing Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
globe Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
insolentia Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147
integritas,and fastidium Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
integritas,and invidia Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
integritas,and paenitentia Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
integritas,and pudor Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
integritas,and verecundia Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148
integritas,as an ethical quality Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147, 148
licinius lucullus,l. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
marcius philippus,(lucius) Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147
objects,inventory of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
objects,their public versus private context Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
plunders cyprus,keeps a statue of zeno Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
plunders cyprus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
plutarch,on cato the younger Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
pompey the great,his moderation concerning plunder Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
pompey the great,his triumph over mithridates Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
pomponius atticus,t.,agent for pompey Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
porcius cato the younger,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
portorium Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
ptolemy,king (of cyrpus) Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147
ptolemy Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
rome,temple of divus augustus,victoria in Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47, 57
self-consciousness,and integritas Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147, 148
self-consciousness,and integrity' Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 147
spoils,inventoried Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
spoils,private versus public use of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
sthennis Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
stratonice Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
tiberius Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 148; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 57
tullius cicero,m.,public versus private view of art Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 57
tullius cicero,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
verres,c.,cicero prosecutes Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47
verres,c.,his mania for collecting Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 57
zeus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 47