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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11065
Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.68


nanSol 'Sun' is so named either because the Sabines called him thus, or because he solus 'alone' shines in such a way that from this god there is the daylight. Luna 'Moon' is so named certainly because she alone 'lucet' shines at night. Therefore she is called Noctiluca 'Night-Shiner' on the Palatine; for there her temple noctu lucet 'shines by night.' Certain persons call her Diana, just as they call the Sun Apollo (the one name, that of Apollo, is Greek, the other Latin); and from the fact that the Moon goes both high and widely, she is called Diviana. From the fact that the Moon is wont to be under the lands as well as over them, Ennius's Epicharmus calls her Proserpina. Proserpina received her name because she, like a serpens 'creeper,' moves widely now to the right, now to the left. Serpere 'to creep' and proserpere 'to creep forward' meant the same thing, as Plautus means in what he writes: Like a forward-creeping beast.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.457 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.457. /that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind
2. Homer, Odyssey, 10.491 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.42-5.43 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Clement of Rome, 1 Clement, 6.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.2. διὰ ζῆλος διωχθεῖσαι γυναῖκες Δαναΐδες καὶ Δίρκαι, This is perhaps corrupt: but no ssatisfactory emendation is known. αἰκίσματα δεινὰ καὶ ἀνόσια παθοῦσαι, ἐπὶ τὸν τῆς πίστεως βέβαιον δρόμον κατήντησαν καὶ ἔλαβον γέρας γενναῖον αἱ ἀσθενεῖς τῷ σώματι.
5. New Testament, Acts, 19.23-19.40 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19.23. About that time there arose no small stir concerning the Way. 19.24. For a certain man named Demetrius, a silversmith, who made silver shrines of Artemis, brought no little business to the craftsmen 19.25. whom he gathered together, with the workmen of like occupation, and said, "Sirs, you know that by this business we have our wealth. 19.26. You see and hear, that not at Ephesus alone, but almost throughout all Asia, this Paul has persuaded and turned away many people, saying that they are no gods, that are made with hands. 19.27. Not only is there danger that this our trade come into disrepute, but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis will be counted as nothing, and her majesty destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worships. 19.28. When they heard this they were filled with anger, and cried out, saying, "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians! 19.29. The whole city was filled with confusion, and they rushed with one accord into the theater, having seized Gaius and Aristarchus, men of Macedonia, Paul's companions in travel. 19.30. When Paul wanted to enter in to the people, the disciples didn't allow him. 19.31. Certain also of the Asiarchs, being his friends, sent to him and begged him not to venture into the theater. 19.32. Some therefore cried one thing, and some another, for the assembly was in confusion. Most of them didn't know why they had come together. 19.33. They brought Alexander out of the multitude, the Jews putting him forward. Alexander beckoned with his hand, and would have made a defense to the people. 19.34. But when they perceived that he was a Jew, all with one voice for a time of about two hours cried out, "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians! 19.35. When the town clerk had quieted the multitude, he said, "You men of Ephesus, what man is there who doesn't know that the city of the Ephesians is temple-keeper of the great goddess Artemis, and of the image which fell down from Zeus? 19.36. Seeing then that these things can't be denied, you ought to be quiet, and to do nothing rash. 19.37. For you have brought these men here, who are neither robbers of temples nor blasphemers of your goddess. 19.38. If therefore Demetrius and the craftsmen who are with him have a matter against anyone, the courts are open, and there are proconsuls. Let them press charges against one another. 19.39. But if you seek anything about other matters, it will be settled in the regular assembly. 19.40. For indeed we are in danger of being accused concerning this day's riot, there being no cause. Concerning it, we wouldn't be able to give an account of this commotion.
6. Suetonius, Augustus, 29.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Tacitus, Annals, 15.41, 15.44 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.41.  It would not be easy to attempt an estimate of the private dwellings, tenement-blocks, and temples, which were lost; but the flames consumed, in their old-world sanctity, the temple dedicated to Luna by Servius Tullius, the great altar and chapel of the Arcadian Evander to the Present Hercules, the shrine of Jupiter Stator vowed by Romulus, the Palace of Numa, and the holy place of Vesta with the Penates of the Roman people. To these must be added the precious trophies won upon so many fields, the glories of Greek art, and yet again the primitive and uncorrupted memorials of literary genius; so that, despite the striking beauty of the rearisen city, the older generation recollects much that it proved impossible to replace. There were those who noted that the first outbreak of the fire took place on the nineteenth of July, the anniversary of the capture and burning of Rome by the Senones: others have pushed their researches so far as to resolve the interval between the two fires into equal numbers of years, of months, and of days. 15.44.  So far, the precautions taken were suggested by human prudence: now means were sought for appeasing deity, and application was made to the Sibylline books; at the injunction of which public prayers were offered to Vulcan, Ceres, and Proserpine, while Juno was propitiated by the matrons, first in the Capitol, then at the nearest point of the sea-shore, where water was drawn for sprinkling the temple and image of the goddess. Ritual banquets and all-night vigils were celebrated by women in the married state. But neither human help, nor imperial munificence, nor all the modes of placating Heaven, could stifle scandal or dispel the belief that the fire had taken place by order. Therefore, to scotch the rumour, Nero substituted as culprits, and punished with the utmost refinements of cruelty, a class of men, loathed for their vices, whom the crowd styled Christians. Christus, the founder of the name, had undergone the death penalty in the reign of Tiberius, by sentence of the procurator Pontius Pilatus, and the pernicious superstition was checked for a moment, only to break out once more, not merely in Judaea, the home of the disease, but in the capital itself, where all things horrible or shameful in the world collect and find a vogue. First, then, the confessed members of the sect were arrested; next, on their disclosures, vast numbers were convicted, not so much on the count of arson as for hatred of the human race. And derision accompanied their end: they were covered with wild beasts' skins and torn to death by dogs; or they were fastened on crosses, and, when daylight failed were burned to serve as lamps by night. Nero had offered his Gardens for the spectacle, and gave an exhibition in his Circus, mixing with the crowd in the habit of a charioteer, or mounted on his car. Hence, in spite of a guilt which had earned the most exemplary punishment, there arose a sentiment of pity, due to the impression that they were being sacrificed not for the welfare of the state but to the ferocity of a single man.
8. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Anon., Ijo, 2.241



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
archaisms Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 119
artemis, and moon, at ephesus Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
artemis, and moon Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
augustus Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
breasts of artemis at ephesus' Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
childbirth, artemis helps in Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
coinage, ideological uses Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
coinage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
dead, death Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
deity, cult statues of Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
deity, myths of Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
deity, temples to Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
deity, visual depictions of Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
diana, and actaeon, and moon Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
dionysus of halicarnassus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
earth, bodies in, blessed or afflicted by moon-goddess, bolts of, barred by proserpina Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
eileithyia Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
einodia Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 119
ephesus, sister of phoebus adored in Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
ephesus Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
family Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
festus (grammarian) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
fire, connected with water Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 119
frescoes Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
gender Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
ghosts, repelled by proserpina Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
hades, spouse of Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
hera, and carthage Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
herculaneum Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
hydreion Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 119
locheia Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
luna/diana/the moon Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
martyr, martyrdom Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
moon, emerging from sea, and artemis Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
mosaic (ethnicity) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
nero Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
nomen numen Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 119
persephoneia Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
phoebus, sister of, helper in childbirth and adored in ephesus Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
pompeii Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
proserpine, repels ghosts with threefold countenance, keeps barred the bolts of earth Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
proserpine, repels ghosts with threefold countenance Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
religion and god(desse)s Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
republic, roman, ethnic plurality Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
roman empire Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
rome (city) Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
rome ara pacis, capitoline or mons tarpeius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
rome ara pacis, porta pandana Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
romulus and camillus, and roman places Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
sabine, and religion Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
sabines as austere, enfranchisement and belonging Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
social war Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
spectacle Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
tacitus Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
tatius king of sabines Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 101
threefold countenance, of proserpina Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 117
violence Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248
woman, women Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 248