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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11049
Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 5.415-5.454
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.381-9.384 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.381. /and if yet other should be added thereto I care not whence, not though it were all the wealth that goeth in to Orchomenus, or to Thebes of Egypt, where treasures in greatest store are laid up in men's houses,—Thebes which is a city of an hundred gates wherefrom sally forth through each two hundred warriors with horses and cars; 9.382. /and if yet other should be added thereto I care not whence, not though it were all the wealth that goeth in to Orchomenus, or to Thebes of Egypt, where treasures in greatest store are laid up in men's houses,—Thebes which is a city of an hundred gates wherefrom sally forth through each two hundred warriors with horses and cars; 9.383. /and if yet other should be added thereto I care not whence, not though it were all the wealth that goeth in to Orchomenus, or to Thebes of Egypt, where treasures in greatest store are laid up in men's houses,—Thebes which is a city of an hundred gates wherefrom sally forth through each two hundred warriors with horses and cars; 9.384. /and if yet other should be added thereto I care not whence, not though it were all the wealth that goeth in to Orchomenus, or to Thebes of Egypt, where treasures in greatest store are laid up in men's houses,—Thebes which is a city of an hundred gates wherefrom sally forth through each two hundred warriors with horses and cars;
2. Herodotus, Histories, 2.102-2.110 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.102. Leaving the latter aside, then, I shall speak of the king who came after them, whose name was Sesostris . ,This king, the priests said, set out with a fleet of long ships from the Arabian Gulf and subjugated all those living by the Red Sea, until he came to a sea which was too shallow for his vessels. ,After returning from there back to Egypt, he gathered a great army (according to the account of the priests) and marched over the mainland, subjugating every nation to which he came. ,When those that he met were valiant men and strove hard for freedom, he set up pillars in their land, the inscription on which showed his own name and his country's, and how he had overcome them with his own power; ,but when the cities had made no resistance and been easily taken, then he put an inscription on the pillars just as he had done where the nations were brave; but he also drew on them the private parts of a woman, wishing to show clearly that the people were cowardly. 2.103. He marched over the country doing this until he had crossed over from Asia to Europe and defeated the Scythians and Thracians. Thus far and no farther, I think, the Egyptian army went; for the pillars can be seen standing in their country, but in none beyond it. ,From there, he turned around and went back home; and when he came to the Phasis river, that King, Sesostris, may have detached some part of his army and left it there to live in the country (for I cannot speak with exact knowledge), or it may be that some of his soldiers grew weary of his wanderings, and stayed by the Phasis. 2.104. For it is plain to see that the Colchians are Egyptians; and what I say, I myself noted before I heard it from others. When it occurred to me, I inquired of both peoples; and the Colchians remembered the Egyptians better than the Egyptians remembered the Colchians; ,the Egyptians said that they considered the Colchians part of Sesostris' army. I myself guessed it, partly because they are dark-skinned and woolly-haired; though that indeed counts for nothing, since other peoples are, too; but my better proof was that the Colchians and Egyptians and Ethiopians are the only nations that have from the first practised circumcision. ,The Phoenicians and the Syrians of Palestine acknowledge that they learned the custom from the Egyptians, and the Syrians of the valleys of the Thermodon and the Parthenius, as well as their neighbors the Macrones, say that they learned it lately from the Colchians. These are the only nations that circumcise, and it is seen that they do just as the Egyptians. ,But as to the Egyptians and Ethiopians themselves, I cannot say which nation learned it from the other; for it is evidently a very ancient custom. That the others learned it through traffic with Egypt, I consider clearly proved by this: that Phoenicians who traffic with Hellas cease to imitate the Egyptians in this matter and do not circumcise their children. 2.105. Listen to something else about the Colchians, in which they are like the Egyptians: they and the Egyptians alone work linen and have the same way of working it, a way peculiar to themselves; and they are alike in all their way of life, and in their speech. Linen has two names: the Colchian kind is called by the Greeks Sardonian ; that which comes from Egypt is called Egyptian. 2.106. As to the pillars that Sesostris, king of Egypt, set up in the countries, most of them are no longer to be seen. But I myself saw them in the Palestine district of Syria, with the aforesaid writing and the women's private parts on them. ,Also, there are in Ionia two figures of this man carved in rock, one on the road from Ephesus to Phocaea, and the other on that from Sardis to Smyrna . ,In both places, the figure is over twenty feet high, with a spear in his right hand and a bow in his left, and the rest of his equipment proportional; for it is both Egyptian and Ethiopian; ,and right across the breast from one shoulder to the other a text is cut in the Egyptian sacred characters, saying: “I myself won this land with the strength of my shoulders.” There is nothing here to show who he is and whence he comes, but it is shown elsewhere. ,Some of those who have seen these figures guess they are Memnon, but they are far indeed from the truth. 2.107. Now when this Egyptian Sesostris (so the priests said) reached Daphnae of Pelusium on his way home, leading many captives from the peoples whose lands he had subjugated, his brother, whom he had left in charge in Egypt, invited him and his sons to a banquet and then piled wood around the house and set it on fire. ,When Sesostris was aware of this, he at once consulted his wife, whom (it was said) he had with him; and she advised him to lay two of his six sons on the fire and make a bridge over the burning so that they could walk over the bodies of the two and escape. This Sesostris did; two of his sons were thus burnt but the rest escaped alive with their father. 2.108. After returning to Egypt, and avenging himself on his brother, Sesostris found work for the multitude which he brought with him from the countries which he had subdued. ,It was these who dragged the great and long blocks of stone which were brought in this king's reign to the temple of Hephaestus; and it was they who were compelled to dig all the canals which are now in Egypt, and involuntarily made what had been a land of horses and carts empty of these. ,For from this time Egypt, although a level land, could use no horses or carts, because there were so many canals going every which way. The reason why the king thus intersected the country was this: ,those Egyptians whose towns were not on the Nile, but inland from it, lacked water whenever the flood left their land, and drank only brackish water from wells. 2.109. For this reason Egypt was intersected. This king also (they said) divided the country among all the Egyptians by giving each an equal parcel of land, and made this his source of revenue, assessing the payment of a yearly tax. ,And any man who was robbed by the river of part of his land could come to Sesostris and declare what had happened; then the king would send men to look into it and calculate the part by which the land was diminished, so that thereafter it should pay in proportion to the tax originally imposed. ,From this, in my opinion, the Greeks learned the art of measuring land; the sunclock and the sundial, and the twelve divisions of the day, came to Hellas from Babylonia and not from Egypt . 2.110. Sesostris was the only Egyptian king who also ruled Ethiopia . To commemorate his name, he set before the temple of Hephaestus two stone statues, of himself and of his wife, each fifty feet high, and statues of his four sons, each thirty-three feet. ,Long afterwards, Darius the Persian would have set up his statue before these; but the priest of Hephaestus forbade him, saying that he had achieved nothing equal to the deeds of Sesostris the Egyptian; for Sesostris (he said) had subjugated the Scythians, besides as many nations as Darius had conquered, and Darius had not been able to overcome the Scythians; ,therefore, it was not just that Darius should set his statue before the statues of Sesostris, whose achievements he had not equalled. Darius, it is said, let the priest have his way.
3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.1-3.4, 3.215-3.246, 3.248, 3.646-3.651, 3.1331-3.1338, 4.253-4.270, 4.279-4.297 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1. εἰ δʼ ἄγε νῦν, Ἐρατώ, παρά θʼ ἵστασο, καί μοι ἔνισπε 3.215. ἔσταν δʼ ἐν προμολῇσι τεθηπότες ἕρκεʼ ἄνακτος 3.216. εὐρείας τε πύλας καὶ κίονας, οἳ περὶ τοίχους 3.217. ἑξείης ἄνεχον· θριγκὸς δʼ ἐφύπερθε δόμοιο 3.218. λαΐνεος χαλκέῃσιν ἐπὶ γλυφίδεσσιν ἀρήρει. 3.219. εὔκηλοι δʼ ὑπὲρ οὐδὸν ἔπειτʼ ἔβαν. ἄγχι δὲ τοῖο 3.220. ἡμερίδες χλοεροῖσι καταστεφέες πετάλοισιν 3.221. ὑψοῦ ἀειρόμεναι μέγʼ ἐθήλεον. αἱ δʼ ὑπὸ τῇσιν 3.222. ἀέναοι κρῆναι πίσυρες ῥέον, ἃς ἐλάχηνεν 3.223. Ἥφαιστος. καί ῥʼ ἡ μέν ἀναβλύεσκε γάλακτι 3.224. ἡ δʼ οἴνῳ, τριτάτη δὲ θυώδεϊ νᾶεν ἀλοιφῇ· 3.225. ἡ δʼ ἄρʼ ὕδωρ προρέεσκε, τὸ μέν ποθι δυομένῃσιν 3.226. θέρμετο Πληιάδεσσιν, ἀμοιβηδὶς δʼ ἀνιούσαις 3.227. κρυστάλλῳ ἴκελον κοίλης ἀνεκήκιε πέτρης. 3.228. τοῖʼ ἄρʼ ἐνὶ μεγάροισι Κυταιέος Αἰήταο 3.229. τεχνήεις Ἥφαιστος ἐμήσατο θέσκελα ἔργα. 3.230. καί οἱ χαλκόποδας ταύρους κάμε, χάλκεα δέ σφεων 3.231. ἦν στόματʼ, ἐκ δὲ πυρὸς δεινὸν σέλας ἀμπνείεσκον· 3.232. πρὸς δὲ καὶ αὐτόγυον στιβαροῦ ἀδάμαντος ἄροτρον 3.233. ἤλασεν, Ἠελίῳ τίνων χάριν, ὅς ῥά μιν ἵπποις 3.234. δέξατο, Φλεγραίῃ κεκμηότα δηιοτῆτι. 3.235. ἔνθα δὲ καὶ μέσσαυλος ἐλήλατο· τῇ δʼ ἐπὶ πολλαὶ 3.236. δικλίδες εὐπηγεῖς θάλαμοί τʼ ἔσαν ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα· 3.237. δαιδαλέη δʼ αἴθουσα παρὲξ ἑκάτερθε τέτυκτο. 3.238. λέχρις δʼ αἰπύτεροι δόμοι ἕστασαν ἀμφοτέρωθεν. 3.239. τῶν ἤτοι ἄλλῳ μέν, ὅτις καὶ ὑπείροχος ἦεν 3.240. κρείων Αἰήτης σὺν ἑῇ ναίεσκε δάμαρτι· 3.241. ἄλλῳ δʼ Ἄψυρτος ναῖεν πάις Αἰήταο. 3.242. τὸν μὲν Καυκασίη νύμφη τέκεν Ἀστερόδεια 3.243. πρίν περ κουριδίην θέσθαι Εἰδυῖαν ἄκοιτιν 3.244. Τηθύος Ὠκεανοῦ τε πανοπλοτάτην γεγαυῖαν. 3.245. καί μιν Κόλχων υἷες ἐπωνυμίην Φαέθοντα 3.246. ἔκλεον, οὕνεκα πᾶσι μετέπρεπεν ἠιθέοισιν. 3.248. ἄμφω, Χαλκιόπη Μήδειά τε. τὴν μὲν ἄρʼ οἵγε 3.646. νήλιπος, οἰέανος· καὶ δὴ λελίητο νέεσθαι 3.647. αὐτοκασιγνήτηνδε, καὶ ἕρκεος οὐδὸν ἄμειψεν. 3.648. δὴν δὲ καταυτόθι μίμνεν ἐνὶ προδόμῳ θαλάμοιο 3.649. αἰδοῖ ἐεργομένη· μετὰ δʼ ἐτράπετʼ αὖτις ὀπίσσω 3.650. στρεφθεῖσʼ· ἐκ δὲ πάλιν κίεν ἔνδοθεν, ἄψ τʼ ἀλέεινεν 3.651. εἴσω· τηΰσιοι δὲ πόδες φέρον ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα· 3.1331. ἤισαν· ὀκριόεσσα δʼ ἐρείκετο νειὸς ὀπίσσω 3.1332. σχιζομένη ταύρων τε βίῃ κρατερῷ τʼ ἀροτῆρι. 3.1333. δεινὸν δʼ ἐσμαράγευν ἄμυδις κατὰ ὦλκας ἀρότρου 3.1334. βώλακες ἀγνύμεναι ἀνδραχθέες· εἵπετο δʼ αὐτὸς 3.1335. λαῖον ἐπὶ στιβαρῷ πιέσας ποδί· τῆλε δʼ ἑοῖο 3.1336. βάλλεν ἀρηρομένην αἰεὶ κατὰ βῶλον ὀδόντας 3.1337. ἐντροπαλιζόμενος, μή οἱ πάρος ἀντιάσειεν 3.1338. γηγενέων ἀνδρῶν ὀλοὸς στάχυς· οἱ δʼ ἄρʼ ἐπιπρὸ 4.253. αὐτίκα δʼ Αἰσονίδης ἐμνήσατο, σὺν δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι 4.254. ἥρωες, Φινῆος, ὃ δὴ πλόον ἄλλον ἔειπεν 4.255. ἐξ Αἴης ἔσσεσθαι· ἀνώιστος δʼ ἐτέτυκτο 4.256. πᾶσιν ὁμῶς. Ἄργος δὲ λιλαιομένοις ἀγόρευσεν· 4.257. ‘Νισσόμεθʼ Ὀρχομενὸν τὴν ἔχραεν ὔμμι περῆσαι 4.258. νημερτὴς ὅδε μάντις, ὅτῳ ξυνέβητε πάροιθεν. 4.259. ἔστιν γὰρ πλόος ἄλλος, ὃν ἀθανάτων ἱερῆες 4.260. πέφραδον, οἳ Θήβης Τριτωνίδος ἐκγεγάασιν. 4.261. οὔπω τείρεα πάντα, τά τʼ οὐρανῷ εἱλίσσονται 4.262. οὐδέ τί πω Δαναῶν ἱερὸν γένος ἦεν ἀκοῦσαι 4.263. πευθομένοις· οἶοι δʼ ἔσαν Ἀρκάδες Ἀπιδανῆες 4.264. Ἀρκάδες, οἳ καὶ πρόσθε σεληναίης ὑδέονται 4.265. ζώειν, φηγὸν ἔδοντες ἐν οὔρεσιν. οὐδὲ Πελασγὶς 4.266. χθὼν τότε κυδαλίμοισιν ἀνάσσετο Δευκαλίδῃσιν 4.267. ἦμος ὅτʼ Ἠερίη πολυλήιος ἐκλήιστο 4.268. μήτηρ Αἴγυπτος προτερηγενέων αἰζηῶν 4.269. καὶ ποταμὸς Τρίτων ἠύρροος, ᾧ ὕπο πᾶσα 4.270. ἄρδεται Ἠερίη· Διόθεν δέ μιν οὔποτε δεύει 4.279. οἳ δή τοι γραπτῦς πατέρων ἕθεν εἰρύονται 4.280. κύρβιας, οἷς ἔνι πᾶσαι ὁδοὶ καὶ πείρατʼ ἔασιν 4.281. ὑγρῆς τε τραφερῆς τε πέριξ ἐπινισσομένοισιν. 4.282. ἔστι δέ τις ποταμός, ὕπατον κέρας Ὠκεανοῖο 4.283. εὐρύς τε προβαθής τε καὶ ὁλκάδι νηὶ περῆσαι· 4.284. Ἴστρον μιν καλέοντες ἑκὰς διετεκμήραντο· 4.285. ὅς δή τοι τείως μὲν ἀπείρονα τέμνετʼ ἄρουραν 4.286. εἷς οἶος· πηγαὶ γὰρ ὑπὲρ πνοιῆς βορέαο 4.287. Ῥιπαίοις ἐν ὄρεσσιν ἀπόπροθι μορμύρουσιν. 4.288. ἀλλʼ ὁπόταν Θρῃκῶν Σκυθέων τʼ ἐπιβήσεται οὔρους 4.289. ἔνθα διχῆ τὸ μὲν ἔνθα μετʼ ἠῴην ἅλα βάλλει 4.290. τῇδʼ ὕδωρ, τὸ δʼ ὄπισθε βαθὺν διὰ κόλπον ἵησιν 4.291. σχιζόμενος πόντου Τρινακρίου εἰσανέχοντα 4.292. γαίῃ ὃς ὑμετέρῃ παρακέκλιται, εἰ ἐτεὸν δὴ 4.293. ὑμετέρης γαίης Ἀχελώιος ἐξανίησιν.’ 4.294. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· τοῖσιν δὲ θεὰ τέρας ἐγγυάλιξεν 4.295. αἴσιον, ᾧ καὶ πάντες ἐπευφήμησαν ἰδόντες 4.296. στέλλεσθαι τήνδʼ οἶμον. ἐπιπρὸ γὰρ ὁλκὸς ἐτύχθη 4.297. οὐρανίης ἀκτῖνος, ὅπῃ καὶ ἀμεύσιμον ἦεν.
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 5.1248 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.1-2.18, 2.22-2.30, 5.572-5.642 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.305-1.642, 7.37-7.45, 8.617-8.731, 8.841-8.848 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.305. near him, her radiant eyes all dim with tears 1.306. nor smiling any more, Venus approached 1.307. and thus complained: “O thou who dost control 1.308. things human and divine by changeless laws 1.309. enthroned in awful thunder! What huge wrong 1.310. could my Aeneas and his Trojans few 1.311. achieve against thy power? For they have borne 1.312. unnumbered deaths, and, failing Italy 1.313. the gates of all the world against them close. 1.314. Hast thou not given us thy covet 1.315. that hence the Romans when the rolling years 1.316. have come full cycle, shall arise to power 1.317. from Troy 's regenerate seed, and rule supreme 1.318. the unresisted lords of land and sea? 1.319. O Sire, what swerves thy will? How oft have I 1.320. in Troy 's most lamentable wreck and woe 1.321. consoled my heart with this, and balanced oft 1.322. our destined good against our destined ill! 1.323. But the same stormful fortune still pursues 1.324. my band of heroes on their perilous way. 1.325. When shall these labors cease, O glorious King? 1.326. Antenor, though th' Achaeans pressed him sore 1.327. found his way forth, and entered unassailed 1.328. Illyria 's haven, and the guarded land 1.329. of the Liburni. Straight up stream he sailed 1.330. where like a swollen sea Timavus pours 1.331. a nine-fold flood from roaring mountain gorge 1.332. and whelms with voiceful wave the fields below. 1.333. He built Patavium there, and fixed abodes 1.334. for Troy 's far-exiled sons; he gave a name 1.335. to a new land and race; the Trojan arms 1.336. were hung on temple walls; and, to this day 1.337. lying in perfect peace, the hero sleeps. 1.338. But we of thine own seed, to whom thou dost 1.339. a station in the arch of heaven assign 1.340. behold our navy vilely wrecked, because 1.341. a single god is angry; we endure 1.342. this treachery and violence, whereby 1.343. wide seas divide us from th' Hesperian shore. 1.344. Is this what piety receives? Or thus 1.346. Smiling reply, the Sire of gods and men 1.347. with such a look as clears the skies of storm 1.348. chastely his daughter kissed, and thus spake on: 1.349. “Let Cytherea cast her fears away! 1.350. Irrevocably blest the fortunes be 1.351. of thee and thine. Nor shalt thou fail to see 1.352. that City, and the proud predestined wall 1.353. encompassing Lavinium . Thyself 1.354. hall starward to the heights of heaven bear 1.355. Aeneas the great-hearted. Nothing swerves 1.356. my will once uttered. Since such carking cares 1.357. consume thee, I this hour speak freely forth 1.358. and leaf by leaf the book of fate unfold. 1.359. Thy son in Italy shall wage vast war 1.360. and, quell its nations wild; his city-wall 1.361. and sacred laws shall be a mighty bond 1.362. about his gathered people. Summers three 1.363. hall Latium call him king; and three times pass 1.364. the winter o'er Rutulia's vanquished hills. 1.365. His heir, Ascanius, now Iulus called 1.366. (Ilus it was while Ilium 's kingdom stood) 1.367. full thirty months shall reign, then move the throne 1.368. from the Lavinian citadel, and build 1.370. Here three full centuries shall Hector's race 1.371. have kingly power; till a priestess queen 1.372. by Mars conceiving, her twin offspring bear; 1.373. then Romulus, wolf-nursed and proudly clad 1.374. in tawny wolf-skin mantle, shall receive 1.375. the sceptre of his race. He shall uprear 1.376. and on his Romans his own name bestow. 1.377. To these I give no bounded times or power 1.378. but empire without end. Yea, even my Queen 1.379. Juno, who now chastiseth land and sea 1.380. with her dread frown, will find a wiser way 1.381. and at my sovereign side protect and bless 1.382. the Romans, masters of the whole round world 1.383. who, clad in peaceful toga, judge mankind. 1.384. Such my decree! In lapse of seasons due 1.385. the heirs of Ilium 's kings shall bind in chains 1.386. Mycenae 's glory and Achilles' towers 1.387. and over prostrate Argos sit supreme. 1.388. of Trojan stock illustriously sprung 1.389. lo, Caesar comes! whose power the ocean bounds 1.390. whose fame, the skies. He shall receive the name 1.391. Iulus nobly bore, great Julius, he. 1.392. Him to the skies, in Orient trophies dress 1.393. thou shalt with smiles receive; and he, like us 1.394. hall hear at his own shrines the suppliant vow. 1.395. Then will the world grow mild; the battle-sound 1.396. will be forgot; for olden Honor then 1.397. with spotless Vesta, and the brothers twain 1.398. Remus and Romulus, at strife no more 1.399. will publish sacred laws. The dreadful gates 1.400. whence issueth war, shall with close-jointed steel 1.401. be barred impregnably; and prisoned there 1.402. the heaven-offending Fury, throned on swords 1.403. and fettered by a hundred brazen chains 1.405. These words he gave, and summoned Maia's son 1.406. the herald Mercury, who earthward flying 1.407. hould bid the Tyrian realms and new-built towers 1.408. welcome the Trojan waifs; lest Dido, blind 1.409. to Fate's decree, should thrust them from the land. 1.410. He takes his flight, with rhythmic stroke of wing 1.411. across th' abyss of air, and soon draws near 1.412. unto the Libyan mainland. He fulfils 1.413. his heavenly task; the Punic hearts of stone 1.414. grow soft beneath the effluence divine; 1.415. and, most of all, the Queen, with heart at ease 1.417. But good Aeneas, pondering all night long 1.418. his many cares, when first the cheerful dawn 1.419. upon him broke, resolved to take survey 1.420. of this strange country whither wind and wave 1.421. had driven him,—for desert land it seemed,— 1.422. to learn what tribes of man or beast possess 1.423. a place so wild, and careful tidings bring 1.424. back to his friends. His fleet of ships the while 1.425. where dense, dark groves o'er-arch a hollowed crag 1.426. he left encircled in far-branching shade. 1.427. Then with no followers save his trusty friend 1.428. Achates, he went forth upon his way 1.429. two broad-tipped javelins poising in his hand. 1.430. Deep to the midmost wood he went, and there 1.431. his Mother in his path uprose; she seemed 1.432. in garb and countece a maid, and bore 1.433. like Spartan maids, a weapon; in such guise 1.434. Harpalyce the Thracian urges on 1.435. her panting coursers and in wild career 1.436. outstrips impetuous Hebrus as it flows. 1.437. Over her lovely shoulders was a bow 1.438. lender and light, as fits a huntress fair; 1.439. her golden tresses without wimple moved 1.440. in every wind, and girded in a knot 1.441. her undulant vesture bared her marble knees. 1.442. She hailed them thus: “Ho, sirs, I pray you tell 1.443. if haply ye have noted, as ye came 1.444. one of my sisters in this wood astray? 1.445. She bore a quiver, and a lynx's hide 1.446. her spotted mantle was; perchance she roused 1.448. So Venus spoke, and Venus' son replied: 1.449. “No voice or vision of thy sister fair 1.450. has crossed my path, thou maid without a name! 1.451. Thy beauty seems not of terrestrial mould 1.452. nor is thy music mortal! Tell me, goddess 1.453. art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph 1.454. the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art 1.455. thy favor we implore, and potent aid 1.456. in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies 1.457. or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! 1.458. Strange are these lands and people where we rove 1.459. compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand 1.461. Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.463. bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white 1.464. lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies 1.465. the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold 1.466. Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell 1.467. the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. 1.468. Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there 1.469. from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity 1.470. of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; 1.471. too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; 1.472. I trace the larger outline of her story: 1.473. Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad 1.474. no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed 1.475. by his ill-fated lady's fondest love 1.476. whose father gave him her first virgin bloom 1.477. in youthful marriage. But the kingly power 1.478. among the Tyrians to her brother came 1.479. Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime 1.480. in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose 1.481. a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch 1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 1.483. of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul 1.484. upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus 1.485. and at the very altar hewed him down. 1.486. Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully 1.487. deceived with false hopes, and empty words 1.488. her grief and stricken love. But as she slept 1.489. her husband's tombless ghost before her came 1.490. with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare 1.491. his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so 1.492. the blood-stained altar and the infamy 1.493. that darkened now their house. His counsel was 1.494. to fly, self-banished, from her ruined land 1.495. and for her journey's aid, he whispered where 1.496. his buried treasure lay, a weight unknown 1.497. of silver and of gold. Thus onward urged 1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay 1.503. and loaded them with gold; the hoarded wealth 1.504. of vile and covetous Pygmalion 1.505. they took to sea. A woman wrought this deed. 1.506. Then came they to these lands where now thine eyes 1.507. behold yon walls and yonder citadel 1.508. of newly rising Carthage . For a price 1.509. they measured round so much of Afric soil 1.510. as one bull's hide encircles, and the spot 1.511. received its name, the Byrsa. But, I pray 1.512. what men are ye? from what far land arrived 1.513. and whither going?” When she questioned thus 1.514. her son, with sighs that rose from his heart's depths 1.516. “Divine one, if I tell 1.517. my woes and burdens all, and thou could'st pause 1.518. to heed the tale, first would the vesper star 1.519. th' Olympian portals close, and bid the day 1.520. in slumber lie. of ancient Troy are we— 1.521. if aught of Troy thou knowest! As we roved 1.522. from sea to sea, the hazard of the storm 1.523. cast us up hither on this Libyan coast. 1.524. I am Aeneas, faithful evermore 1.525. to Heaven's command; and in my ships I bear 1.526. my gods ancestral, which I snatched away 1.527. from peril of the foe. My fame is known 1.528. above the stars. I travel on in quest 1.529. of Italy, my true home-land, and I 1.530. from Jove himself may trace my birth divine. 1.531. With twice ten ships upon the Phryglan main 1.532. I launched away. My mother from the skies 1.533. gave guidance, and I wrought what Fate ordained. 1.534. Yet now scarce seven shattered ships survive 1.535. the shock of wind and wave; and I myself 1.536. friendless, bereft, am wandering up and down 1.537. this Libyan wilderness! Behold me here 1.538. from Europe and from Asia exiled still!” 1.539. But Venus could not let him longer plain 1.541. “Whoe'er thou art 1.542. I deem that not unblest of heavenly powers 1.543. with vital breath still thine, thou comest hither 1.544. unto our Tyrian town. Go steadfast on 1.545. and to the royal threshold make thy way! 1.546. I bring thee tidings that thy comrades all 1.547. are safe at land; and all thy ships, conveyed 1.548. by favoring breezes, safe at anchor lie; 1.549. or else in vain my parents gave me skill 1.550. to read the skies. Look up at yonder swans! 1.551. A flock of twelve, whose gayly fluttering file 1.552. erst scattered by Jove's eagle swooping down 1.553. from his ethereal haunt, now form anew 1.554. their long-drawn line, and make a landing-place 1.555. or, hovering over, scan some chosen ground 1.556. or soaring high, with whir of happy wings 1.557. re-circle heaven in triumphant song: 1.558. likewise, I tell thee, thy Iost mariners 1.559. are landed, or fly landward at full sail. 1.561. She ceased and turned away. A roseate beam 1.562. from her bright shoulder glowed; th' ambrosial hair 1.563. breathed more than mortal sweetness, while her robes 1.564. fell rippling to her feet. Each step revealed 1.565. the veritable goddess. Now he knew 1.566. that vision was his mother, and his words 1.567. pursued the fading phantom as it fled: 1.568. “Why is thy son deluded o'er and o'er 1.569. with mocking dreams,—another cruel god? 1.570. Hast thou no hand-clasp true, nor interchange 1.571. of words unfeigned betwixt this heart and thine?” 1.572. Such word of blame he spoke, and took his way 1.573. toward the city's rampart. Venus then 1.574. o'erveiled them as they moved in darkened air,— 1.575. a liquid mantle of thick cloud divine,— 1.576. that viewless they might pass, nor would any 1.577. obstruct, delay, or question why they came. 1.578. To Paphos then she soared, her Ioved abode 1.579. where stands her temple, at whose hundred shrines 1.580. garlands of myrtle and fresh roses breathe 1.582. Meanwhile the wanderers swiftly journey on 1.583. along the clear-marked road, and soon they climb 1.584. the brow of a high hill, which close in view 1.585. o'er-towers the city's crown. The vast exploit 1.586. where lately rose but Afric cabins rude 1.587. Aeneas wondered at: the smooth, wide ways; 1.588. the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. 1.589. The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise 1.590. a wall or citadel, from far below 1.591. lifting the ponderous stone; or with due care 1.592. choose where to build, and close the space around 1.593. with sacred furrow; in their gathering-place 1.594. the people for just governors, just laws 1.595. and for their reverend senate shout acclaim. 1.596. Some clear the harbor mouth; some deeply lay 1.597. the base of a great theatre, and carve out 1.598. proud columns from the mountain, to adorn 1.599. their rising stage with lofty ornament. 1.600. o busy bees above a field of flowers 1.601. in early summer amid sunbeams toil 1.602. leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; 1.603. or with the flowing honey storing close 1.604. the pliant cells, until they quite run o'er 1.605. with nectared sweet; while from the entering swarm 1.606. they take their little loads; or lined for war 1.607. rout the dull drones, and chase them from the hive; 1.608. brisk is the task, and all the honeyed air 1.609. breathes odors of wild thyme. “How blest of Heaven. 1.610. These men that see their promised ramparts rise!” 1.611. Aeneas sighed; and swift his glances moved 1.612. from tower to tower; then on his way he fared 1.613. veiled in the wonder-cloud, whence all unseen 1.614. of human eyes,—O strange the tale and true!— 1.616. Deep in the city's heart there was a grove 1.617. of beauteous shade, where once the Tyrians 1.618. cast here by stormful waves, delved out of earth 1.619. that portent which Queen Juno bade them find,— 1.620. the head of a proud horse,—that ages long 1.621. their boast might be wealth, luxury and war. 1.622. Upon this spot Sidonian Dido raised 1.623. a spacious fane to Juno, which became 1.624. plendid with gifts, and hallowed far and wide 1.625. for potency divine. Its beams were bronze 1.626. and on loud hinges swung the brazen doors. 1.627. A rare, new sight this sacred grove did show 1.628. which calmed Aeneas' fears, and made him bold 1.629. to hope for safety, and with lifted heart 1.630. from his low-fallen fortunes re-aspire. 1.631. For while he waits the advent of the Queen 1.632. he scans the mighty temple, and admires 1.633. the city's opulent pride, and all the skill 1.634. its rival craftsmen in their work approve. 1.635. Behold! he sees old Ilium 's well-fought fields 1.636. in sequent picture, and those famous wars 1.637. now told upon men's lips the whole world round. 1.638. There Atreus' sons, there kingly Priam moved 1.639. and fierce Pelides pitiless to both. 1.640. Aeneas paused, and, weeping, thus began: 1.641. “Alas, Achates, what far region now 1.642. what land in all the world knows not our pain? 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 8.626. in safety stands, I call not Trojan power 8.627. vanquished or fallen. But to help thy war 8.628. my small means match not thy redoubled name. 8.629. Yon Tuscan river is my bound. That way 8.630. Rutulia thrusts us hard and chafes our wall 8.631. with loud, besieging arms. But I propose 8.632. to league with thee a numerous array 8.633. of kings and mighty tribes, which fortune strange 8.634. now brings to thy defence. Thou comest here 8.635. because the Fates intend. Not far from ours 8.636. a city on an ancient rock is seen 8.637. Agylla, which a warlike Lydian clan 8.638. built on the Tuscan hills. It prospered well 8.639. for many a year, then under the proud yoke 8.640. of King Mezentius it came and bore 8.641. his cruel sway. Why tell the loathsome deeds 8.642. and crimes unspeakable the despot wrought? 8.643. May Heaven requite them on his impious head 8.644. and on his children! For he used to chain 8.645. dead men to living, hand on hand was laid 8.646. and face on face,—torment incredible! 8.647. Till, locked in blood-stained, horrible embrace 8.648. a lingering death they found. But at the last 8.649. his people rose in furious despair 8.650. and while he blasphemously raged, assailed 8.651. his life and throne, cut down his guards 8.652. and fired his regal dwellings; he, the while 8.653. escaped immediate death and fied away 8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence 8.655. in Turnus hospitality. To-day 8.656. Etruria, to righteous anger stirred 8.657. demands with urgent arms her guilty King. 8.658. To their large host, Aeneas, I will give 8.659. an added strength, thyself. For yonder shores 8.660. re-echo with the tumult and the cry 8.661. of ships in close array; their eager lords 8.662. are clamoring for battle. But the song 8.663. of the gray omen-giver thus declares 8.664. their destiny: ‘O goodly princes born 8.665. of old Maeonian lineage! Ye that are 8.666. the bloom and glory of an ancient race 8.667. whom just occasions now and noble rage 8.668. enflame against Mezentius your foe 8.669. it is decreed that yonder nation proud 8.670. hall never submit to chiefs Italian-born. 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true. 8.841. to lore inspired and prophesying song 8.842. fore-reading things to come. He pictured there 8.843. Iulus' destined line of glorious sons 8.844. marshalled for many a war. In cavern green 8.845. haunt of the war-god, lay the mother-wolf; 8.846. the twin boy-sucklings at her udders played 8.847. nor feared such nurse; with long neck backward thrown 8.848. he fondled each, and shaped with busy tongue
7. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.45-1.59, 8.525-8.526, 10.111-10.121, 10.268-10.275 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.21, 1.38-1.39, 1.130-1.148, 1.205-1.239, 1.503-1.530, 1.642-1.646, 2.550-2.578, 3.357-3.416, 4.344-4.422, 4.474-4.484, 5.184, 5.217-5.276, 5.329, 5.333-5.342, 5.350-5.352, 5.362, 5.392, 5.397, 5.406-5.414, 5.416-5.455, 5.519-5.531, 5.533, 5.538, 5.540-5.541, 5.546, 5.549-5.557, 6.498, 6.591, 7.32-7.102, 7.109-7.110, 7.115, 7.607-7.609, 8.90-8.111, 8.183-8.199, 8.201, 8.414-8.446 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
achilles Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 86
actium Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
aea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 90
aeacus In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
aeetes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 286, 287, 288, 289
aeneas, and ethnic identity In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88, 89, 93, 94, 146, 315
apollo (see also phoebus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88, 89
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 86, 87, 88, 94, 146, 289
aristotle Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 86
atlas In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 288
augustus (see also octavian) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
baetis, river, barbarian Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 148, 153, 155
cadmus In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
caesar, julius\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 92
callimachus, callimacheanism\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 86, 89, 94
carthage Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 89, 92, 94
centaurs Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72
cicero Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 146
civil war, cadmus and the spartoi In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
civil war, in lucan In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
cleopatra Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 92
colchis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 87, 89, 146, 286, 288
commercialism and egypt Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 160
corinth Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 146, 315
creusa Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
cultural, consciousness of center and periphery Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 155, 156
cyclops (see also polyphemus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 86
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
dardanus In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
descent, shared (syngeneia), in the argonautica In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
dido Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 89, 90, 92, 94; Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 149
egypt, land of wisdom Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 160
egypt, narratives Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 160
egypt, pharaonic Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 148, 149, 150
egypt, ptolemaic Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 150
egypt Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 89, 90
egyptians In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
ekphrasis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 146, 288, 289, 315; Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 149
epic cycle Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 86
ethnic identity In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
ethnonym In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
euripides Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 92, 315
eurystheus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
evander In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
foreshadowing Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 315
geography Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 149, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 160
hercules Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
herodotus, and egypt Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 149, 150
hesione Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
homer Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 86, 315
horace Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 86
idmon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 146
imagining, imagination Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 151
imperial patron Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134
imperialism Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134
insider and outsider Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 155
io, medea assimilated to Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 153, 154, 155, 156
io, transformed into isis Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 155
jason In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 88, 89, 90, 92, 146
juno (also hera) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 149, 153, 154, 160
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 89, 93, 94
jupiter (also zeus) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 152
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 146
laomedon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
latinus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
libya, libyan Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 151
logos, logoi, and valerius flaccus Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 150, 152
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 92
medea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 89, 93, 286, 315
memphis, symbolizes pre-roman egypt Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 148, 154, 155
metanarrative perspectives Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 156, 160
metre Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 289
migration In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
mise en abyme Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88, 89, 94
mopsus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 146
myrmidons In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
national identity In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
nausicaa Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
neptune (also poseidon) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134
nero Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 92
nile, and grain supply (annona) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134
nile, danube (also hister) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 149, 154, 156, 160
nile, delta (mouths of the nile) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 160
nile, departure and destination Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 155
nile, equivalent to rain Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 148
nile, familiar and unfamiliar experiences Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 151, 152
nile, metaphor for poetic composition Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 160
nile, past and present Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 150
nile, peaceful retreat Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 152
nile, phasis Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 155, 156
nile, travels between center and periphery Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 155
orpheus Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 154
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 90, 91, 286, 287, 288, 289, 315
peleus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72
pelias Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
penthesilea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 89
phaethon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 90, 91, 92, 286, 287, 288
pharos, port of alexandria Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 148, 150
phineus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 146
phoebus (see also apollo) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 286
pillars of aea, monument in colchis Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 149, 160
pio, giovan battista (johannes baptista pius)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
pompey (gnaeus pompeius magnus), defines egypt and the nile Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 152
redundancy Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
rome Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 93, 94
seneca the younger Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 92, 315
sesostris, egyptian pharaoh, founder of colchis Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 148, 149, 150, 152, 156, 160
sesostris In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 89, 90
simile Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
sol Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 146, 286, 287, 288, 289, 315
spartoi In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
spontaneous generation' In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
statius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
stoicism Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 146
sun temple, monument in colchis Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134, 148, 149, 160
thetis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 72
tragedy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 92, 315
trojans In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 170
turnus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 88
valerius flaccus, ideological epic of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
valerius flaccus, tyrants in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
vespasian, and augustus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 159
vespasian, emperor, celestial overseer in valerius flaccus Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 134
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 86, 88, 89, 92, 93, 94, 146, 289, 315
vulcan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 90, 93, 146, 287, 315