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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11049
Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 5.238
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6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.399-3.420 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.399. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.400. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.401. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.402. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.403. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.404. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.405. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.406. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.407. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.408. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.409. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.410. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.411. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.412. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.413. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.414. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.415. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.416. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.417. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.418. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.419. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.420. /in silence; and she was unseen of the Trojan women; and the goddess led the way.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 6.102-6.109 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.692, 1.1058-1.1102, 2.835-2.929, 3.678-3.680, 4.854-4.855, 4.1318-4.1329, 4.1499-4.1536 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.692. αὔτως, ἣ θέμις ἐστί, πάρος κακότητα πελάσσαι. 1.1058. αὐτοὶ ὁμῶς λαοί τε Δολίονες. αὐτὰρ ἔπειτα 1.1059. τρὶς περὶ χαλκείοις σὺν τεύχεσι δινηθέντες 1.1060. τύμβῳ ἐνεκτερέιξαν, ἐπειρήσαντό τʼ ἀέθλων 1.1061. ἣ θέμις, ἂμ πεδίον λειμώνιον, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 1.1062. ἀγκέχυται τόδε σῆμα καὶ ὀψιγόνοισιν ἰδέσθαι. 1.1063. οὐδὲ μὲν οὐδʼ ἄλοχος Κλείτη φθιμένοιο λέλειπτο 1.1064. οὗ πόσιος μετόπισθε· κακῷ δʼ ἐπὶ κύντερον ἄλλο 1.1065. ἤνυσεν, ἁψαμένη βρόχον αὐχένι. τὴν δὲ καὶ αὐταὶ 1.1066. νύμφαι ἀποφθιμένην ἀλσηίδες ὠδύραντο· 1.1067. καί οἱ ἀπὸ βλεφάρων ὅσα δάκρυα χεῦαν ἔραζε 1.1068. πάντα τάγε κρήνην τεῦξαν θεαί, ἣν καλέουσιν 1.1069. Κλείτην, δυστήνοιο περικλεὲς οὔνομα νύμφης. 1.1070. αἰνότατον δὴ κεῖνο Δολιονίῃσι γυναιξὶν 1.1071. ἀνδράσι τʼ ἐκ Διὸς ἦμαρ ἐπήλυθεν· οὐδὲ γὰρ αὐτῶν 1.1072. ἔτλη τις πάσσασθαι ἐδητύος, οὐδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν 1.1073. ἐξ ἀχέων ἔργοιο μυληφάτου ἐμνώοντο· 1.1074. ἀλλʼ αὔτως ἄφλεκτα διαζώεσκον ἔδοντες. 1.1075. ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν, εὖτʼ ἄν σφιν ἐτήσια χύτλα χέωνται 1.1076. Κύζικον ἐνναίοντες Ἰάονες, ἔμπεδον αἰεὶ 1.1077. πανδήμοιο μύλης πελάνους ἐπαλετρεύουσιν. 1.1078. ἐκ δὲ τόθεν τρηχεῖαι ἀνηέρθησαν ἄελλαι 1.1079. ἤμαθʼ ὁμοῦ νύκτας τε δυώδεκα, τοὺς δὲ καταῦθι 1.1080. ναυτίλλεσθαι ἔρυκον. ἐπιπλομένῃ δʼ ἐνὶ νυκτὶ 1.1081. ὧλλοι μέν ῥα πάρος δεδμημένοι εὐνάζοντο 1.1082. ὕπνῳ ἀριστῆες πύματον λάχος· αὐτὰρ Ἄκαστος 1.1083. Μόψος τʼ Ἀμπυκίδης ἀδινὰ κνώσσοντας ἔρυντο. 1.1084. ἡ δʼ ἄρʼ ὑπὲρ ξανθοῖο καρήατος Αἰσονίδαο 1.1085. πωτᾶτʼ ἀλκυονὶς λιγυρῇ ὀπὶ θεσπίζουσα 1.1086. λῆξιν ὀρινομένων ἀνέμων· συνέηκε δὲ Μόψος 1.1087. ἀκταίης ὄρνιθος ἐναίσιμον ὄσσαν ἀκούσας. 1.1088. καὶ τὴν μὲν θεὸς αὖτις ἀπέτραπεν, ἷζε δʼ ὕπερθεν 1.1089. νηίου ἀφλάστοιο μετήορος ἀίξασα. 1.1090. τὸν δʼ ὅγε κεκλιμένον μαλακοῖς ἐνὶ κώεσιν οἰῶν. 1.1091. κινήσας ἀνέγειρε παρασχεδόν, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 1.1092. ‘Αἰσονίδη, χρειώ σε τόδʼ ἱερὸν εἰσανιόντα 1.1093. Δινδύμου ὀκριόεντος ἐύθρονον ἱλάξασθαι 1.1094. μητέρα συμπάντων μακάρων· λήξουσι δʼ ἄελλαι 1.1095. ζαχρηεῖς· τοίην γὰρ ἐγὼ νέον ὄσσαν ἄκουσα 1.1096. ἀλκυόνος ἁλίης, ἥ τε κνώσσοντος ὕπερθεν 1.1097. σεῖο πέριξ τὰ ἕκαστα πιφαυσκομένη πεπότηται. 1.1098. ἐκ γὰρ τῆς ἄνεμοί τε θάλασσά τε νειόθι τε χθὼν 1.1099. πᾶσα πεπείρανται νιφόεν θʼ ἕδος Οὐλύμποιο· 1.1100. καί οἱ, ὅτʼ ἐξ ὀρέων μέγαν οὐρανὸν εἰσαναβαίνῃ 1.1101. Ζεὺς αὐτὸς Κρονίδης ὑποχάζεται. ὧς δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι 1.1102. ἀθάνατοι μάκαρες δεινὴν θεὸν ἀμφιέπουσιν.’ 2.835. ἔνθα δὲ ναυτιλίης μὲν ἐρητύοντο μέλεσθαι 2.836. ἀμφὶ δὲ κηδείῃ νέκυος μένον ἀσχαλόωντες. 2.837. ἤματα δὲ τρία πάντα γόων· ἑτέρῳ δέ μιν ἤδη 2.838. τάρχυον μεγαλωστί· συνεκτερέιζε δὲ λαὸς 2.839. αὐτῷ ὁμοῦ βασιλῆι Λύκῳ· παρὰ δʼ ἄσπετα μῆλα 2.840. ἣ θέμις οἰχομένοισι, ταφήια λαιμοτόμησαν. 2.841. καὶ δή τοι κέχυται τοῦδʼ ἀνέρος ἐν χθονὶ κείνῃ 2.842. τύμβος· σῆμα δʼ ἔπεστι καὶ ὀψιγόνοισιν ἰδέσθαι 2.843. νηίου ἐκ κοτίνοιο φάλαγξ· θαλέθει δέ τε φύλλοις 2.844. ἄκρης τυτθὸν ἔνερθʼ Ἀχερουσίδος. εἰ δέ με καὶ τὸ 2.845. χρειὼ ἀπηλεγέως Μουσέων ὕπο γηρύσασθαι 2.846. τόνδε πολισσοῦχον διεπέφραδε Βοιωτοῖσιν 2.847. Νισαίοισί τε Φοῖβος ἐπιρρήδην ἱλάεσθαι 2.848. ἀμφὶ δὲ τήνγε φάλαγγα παλαιγενέος κοτίνοιο 2.849. ἄστυ βαλεῖν· οἱ δʼ ἀντὶ θεουδέος Αἰολίδαο 2.850. Ἴδμονος εἰσέτι νῦν Ἀγαμήστορα κυδαίνουσιν. 2.851. τίς γὰρ δὴ θάνεν ἄλλος; ἐπεὶ καὶ ἔτʼ αὖτις ἔχευαν 2.852. ἥρωες τότε τύμβον ἀποφθιμένου ἑτάροιο. 2.853. δοιὰ γὰρ οὖν κείνων ἔτι σήματα φαίνεται ἀνδρῶν. 2.854. Ἁγνιάδην Τῖφυν θανέειν φάτις· οὐδέ οἱ ἦεν 2.855. μοῖρʼ ἔτι ναυτίλλεσθαι ἑκαστέρω. ἀλλά νυ καὶ τὸν 2.856. αὖθι μινυνθαδίη πάτρης ἑκὰς εὔνασε νοῦσος 2.857. εἰσότʼ Ἀβαντιάδαο νέκυν κτερέιξεν ὅμιλος. 2.858. ἄτλητον δʼ ὀλοῷ ἐπὶ πήματι κῆδος ἕλοντο. 2.859. δὴ γὰρ ἐπεὶ καὶ τόνδε παρασχεδὸν ἐκτερέιξαν 2.860. αὐτοῦ, ἀμηχανίῃσιν ἁλὸς προπάροιθε πεσόντες 2.861. ἐντυπὰς εὐκήλως εἰλυμένοι οὔτε τι σίτου 2.862. μνώοντʼ οὔτε ποτοῖο· κατήμυσαν δʼ ἀχέεσσιν 2.863. θυμόν, ἐπεὶ μάλα πολλὸν ἀπʼ ἐλπίδος ἔπλετο νόστος. 2.864. καί νύ κʼ ἔτι προτέρω τετιημένοι ἰσχανόωντο 2.865. εἰ μὴ ἄρʼ Ἀγκαίῳ περιώσιον ἔμβαλεν Ἥρη 2.866. θάρσος, ὃν Ἰμβρασίοισι παρʼ ὕδασιν Ἀστυπάλαια 2.867. τίκτε Ποσειδάωνι· περιπρὸ γὰρ εὖ ἐκέκαστο 2.868. ἰθύνειν, Πηλῆα δʼ ἐπεσσύμενος προσέειπεν· 2.869. ‘Αἰακίδη, πῶς καλὸν ἀφειδήσαντας ἀέθλων 2.870. γαίῃ ἐν ἀλλοδαπῇ δὴν ἔμμεναι; οὐ μὲν ἄρηος 2.871. ἴδριν ἐόντά με τόσσον ἄγει μετὰ κῶας Ἰήσων 2.872. παρθενίης ἀπάνευθεν, ὅσον τʼ ἐπιίστορα νηῶν. 2.873. τῶ μή μοι τυτθόν γε δέος περὶ νηὶ πελέσθω. 2.874. ὧς δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι δεῦρο δαήμονες ἄνδρες ἔασιν 2.875. τῶν ὅτινα πρύμνης ἐπιβήσομεν, οὔτις ἰάψει 2.876. ναυτιλίην. ἀλλʼ ὦκα, παραιφάμενος τάδε πάντα 2.877. θαρσαλέως ὀρόθυνον ἐπιμνήσασθαι ἀέθλου.’ 2.878. ὧς φάτο· τοῖο δὲ θυμὸς ὀρέξατο γηθοσύνῃσιν. 2.879. αὐτίκα δʼ οὐ μετὰ δηρὸν ἐνὶ μέσσοις ἀγόρευσεν· 2.880. ‘δαιμόνιοι, τί νυ πένθος ἐτώσιον ἴσχομεν αὔτως; 2.881. οἱ μὲν γάρ ποθι τοῦτον, ὃν ἔλλαχον, οἶτον ὄλοντο· 2.882. ἡμῖν δʼ ἐν γὰρ ἔασι κυβερνητῆρες ὁμίλῳ 2.883. καὶ πολέες. τῶ μή τι διατριβώμεθα πείρης· 2.884. ἀλλʼ ἔγρεσθʼ εἰς ἔργον, ἀπορρίψαντες ἀνίας.’ 2.885. τὸν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἀμηχανέων προσέειπεν· 2.886. ‘Αἰακίδη, πῇ δʼ οἵδε κυβερνητῆρες ἔασιν; 2.887. οὓς μὲν γὰρ τὸ πάροιθε δαήμονας εὐχόμεθʼ εἶναι 2.888. οἱ δὲ κατηφήσαντες ἐμεῦ πλέον ἀσχαλόωσιν. 2.889. τῶ καὶ ὁμοῦ φθιμένοισι κακὴν προτιόσσομαι ἄτην 2.890. εἰ δὴ μήτʼ ὀλοοῖο μετὰ πτόλιν Αἰήταο 2.891. ἔσσεται, ἠὲ καὶ αὖτις ἐς Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι 2.892. πετράων ἔκτοσθε, κατʼ αὐτόθι δʼ ἄμμε καλύψει 2.893. ἀκλειῶς κακὸς οἶτος, ἐτώσια γηράσκοντας.’ 2.894. ὧς ἔφατʼ· Ἀγκαῖος δὲ μάλʼ ἐσσυμένως ὑπέδεκτο 2.895. νῆα θοὴν ἄξειν· δὴ γὰρ θεοῦ ἐτράπεθʼ ὁρμῇ. 2.896. τὸν δὲ μετʼ Ἐργῖνος καὶ Ναύπλιος Εὔφημός τε 2.897. ὤρνυντʼ, ἰθύνειν λελιημένοι. ἀλλʼ ἄρα τούσγε 2.898. ἔσχεθον· Ἀγκαίῳ δὲ πολεῖς ᾔνησαν ἑταίρων. 2.899. Ἠῷοι δἤπειτα δυωδεκάτῳ ἐπέβαινον 2.900. ἤματι· δὴ γάρ σφιν ζεφύρου μέγας οὖρος ἄητο. 2.901. καρπαλίμως δʼ Ἀχέροντα διεξεπέρησαν ἐρετμοῖς 2.902. ἐκ δʼ ἔχεαν πίσυνοι ἀνέμῳ λίνα, πουλὺ δʼ ἐπιπρὸ 2.903. λαιφέων πεπταμένων τέμνον πλόον εὐδιόωντες. 2.904. ὦκα δὲ Καλλιχόροιο παρὰ προχοὰς ποταμοῖο 2.905. ἤλυθον, ἔνθʼ ἐνέπουσι Διὸς Νυσήιον υἷα 2.906. Ἰνδῶν ἡνίκα φῦλα λιπὼν κατενάσσατο Θήβας 2.907. ὀργιάσαι, στῆσαί τε χοροὺς ἄντροιο πάροιθεν 2.908. ᾧ ἐν ἀμειδήτους ἁγίας ηὐλίζετο νύκτας 2.909. ἐξ οὗ Καλλίχορον ποταμὸν περιναιετάοντες 2.910. ἠδὲ καὶ Αὐλίον ἄντρον ἐπωνυμίην καλέουσιν. 2.911. ἔνθεν δὲ Σθενέλου τάφον ἔδρακον Ἀκτορίδαο 2.912. ὅς ῥά τʼ Ἀμαζονίδων πολυθαρσέος ἐκ πολέμοιο 2.913. ἂψ ἀνιὼν--δὴ γὰρ συνανήλυθεν Ἡρακλῆι-- 2.914. βλήμενος ἰῷ κεῖθεν ἐπʼ ἀγχιάλου θάνεν ἀκτῆς. 2.915. οὐ μέν θην προτέρω ἔτʼ ἐμέτρεον. ἧκε γὰρ αὐτὴ 2.916. Φερσεφόνη ψυχὴν πολυδάκρυον Ἀκτορίδαο 2.917. λισσομένην τυτθόν περ ὁμήθεας ἄνδρας ἰδέσθαι. 2.918. τύμβου δὲ στεφάνης ἐπιβὰς σκοπιάζετο νῆα 2.919. τοῖος ἐών, οἷος πόλεμόνδʼ ἴεν· ἀμφὶ δὲ καλὴ 2.920. τετράφαλος φοίνικι λόφῳ ἐπελάμπετο πήληξ. 2.921. καί ῥʼ ὁ μὲν αὖτις ἔδυνε μέγαν ζόφον· οἱ δʼ ἐσιδόντες 2.922. θάμβησαν· τοὺς δʼ ὦρσε θεοπροπέων ἐπικέλσαι 2.923. Ἀμπυκίδης Μόψος λοιβῇσί τε μειλίξασθαι. 2.924. οἱ δʼ ἀνὰ μὲν κραιπνῶς λαῖφος σπάσαν, ἐκ δὲ βαλόντες 2.925. πείσματʼ ἐν αἰγιαλῷ Σθενέλου τάφον ἀμφεπένοντο 2.926. χύτλα τέ οἱ χεύοντο, καὶ ἥγνισαν ἔντομα μήλων. 2.927. ἄνδιχα δʼ αὖ χύτλων νηοσσόῳ Ἀπόλλωνι 2.928. βωμὸν δειμάμενοι μῆρʼ ἔφλεγον ἂν δὲ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς 2.929. θῆκε λύρην· ἐκ τοῦ δὲ Λύρη πέλει οὔνομα χώρῳ. 4.854. οὐδέ τις εἰσιδέειν δύνατʼ ἔμπεδον, ἀλλʼ ἄρα τῷγε 4.855. οἴῳ ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖσιν ἐείσατο, φώνησέν τε· 4.1318. ‘κάμμορε, τίπτʼ ἐπὶ τόσσον ἀμηχανίῃ βεβόλησαι; 4.1319. ἴδμεν ἐποιχομένους χρύσεον δέρος· ἴδμεν ἕκαστα 4.1320. ὑμετέρων καμάτων, ὅσʼ ἐπὶ χθονός, ὅσσα τʼ ἐφʼ ὑγρὴν 4.1321. πλαζόμενοι κατὰ πόντον ὑπέρβια ἔργʼ ἐκάμεσθε. 4.1322. οἰοπόλοι δʼ εἰμὲν χθόνιαι θεαὶ αὐδήεσσαι 4.1323. ἡρῷσσαι, Λιβύης τιμήοροι ἠδὲ θύγατρες. 4.1324. ἀλλʼ ἄνα· μηδʼ ἔτι τοῖον ὀιζύων ἀκάχησο· 4.1325. ἄνστησον δʼ ἑτάρους. εὖτʼ ἂν δέ τοι Ἀμφιτρίτη 4.1326. ἅρμα Ποσειδάωνος ἐύτροχον αὐτίκα λύσῃ 4.1327. δή ῥα τότε σφετέρῃ ἀπὸ μητέρι τίνετʼ ἀμοιβὴν 4.1328. ὧν ἔκαμεν δηρὸν κατὰ νηδύος ὔμμε φέρουσα· 4.1329. καί κεν ἔτʼ ἠγαθέην ἐς Ἀχαιίδα νοστήσαιτε.’ 4.1499. ὡς μάθον οἷον ἔρεξε. νέκυν δʼ ἀνάειραν ὀπίσσω 4.1500. πευθόμενοι Μινύαι, γαίῃ δʼ ἐνὶ ταρχύσαντο 4.1501. μυρόμενοι· τὰ δὲ μῆλα μετὰ σφέας οἵγʼ ἐκόμισσαν. 4.1502. ἔνθα καὶ Ἀμπυκίδην αὐτῷ ἐνὶ ἤματι Μόψον 4.1503. νηλειὴς ἕλε πότμος· ἀδευκέα δʼ οὐ φύγεν αἶσαν 4.1504. μαντοσύναις· οὐ γάρ τις ἀποτροπίη θανάτοιο. 4.1505. κεῖτο δʼ ἐπὶ ψαμάθοισι μεσημβρινὸν ἦμαρ ἀλύσκων 4.1506. δεινὸς ὄφις, νωθὴς μὲν ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα χαλέψαι· 4.1507. οὐδʼ ἂν ὑποτρέσσαντος ἐνωπαδὶς ἀίξειεν. 4.1508. ἀλλὰ μὲν ᾧ τὰ πρῶτα μελάγχιμον ἰὸν ἐνείη 4.1509. ζωόντων, ὅσα γαῖα φερέσβιος ἔμπνοα βόσκει 4.1510. οὐδʼ ὁπόσον πήχυιον ἐς Ἄιδα γίγνεται οἶμος 4.1511. οὐδʼ εἰ Παιήων, εἴ μοι θέμις ἀμφαδὸν εἰπεῖν 4.1512. φαρμάσσοι, ὅτε μοῦνον ἐνιχρίμψῃσιν ὀδοῦσιν. 4.1513. εὖτε γὰρ ἰσόθεος Λιβύην ὑπερέπτατο Περσεὺς 4.1514. Εὐρυμέδων--καὶ γὰρ τὸ κάλεσκέ μιν οὔνομα μήτηρ-- 4.1515. Γοργόνος ἀρτίτομον κεφαλὴν βασιλῆι κομίζων 4.1516. ὅσσαι κυανέου στάγες αἵματος οὖδας ἵκοντο 4.1517. αἱ πᾶσαι κείνων ὀφίων γένος ἐβλάστησαν. 4.1518. τῷ δʼ ἄκρην ἐπʼ ἄκανθαν ἐνεστηρίξατο Μόψος 4.1519. λαιὸν ἐπιπροφέρων ταρσὸν ποδός· αὐτὰρ ὁ μέσσην 4.1520. κερκίδα καὶ μυῶνα, πέριξ ὀδύνῃσιν ἑλιχθείς 4.1521. σάρκα δακὼν ἐχάραξεν. ἀτὰρ Μήδεια καὶ ἄλλαι 4.1522. ἔτρεσαν ἀμφίπολοι· ὁ δὲ φοίνιον ἕλκος ἄφασσεν 4.1523. θαρσαλέως, ἕνεκʼ οὔ μιν ὑπέρβιον ἄλγος ἔτειρεν. 4.1524. σχέτλιος· ἦ τέ οἱ ἤδη ὑπὸ χροῒ δύετο κῶμα 4.1525. λυσιμελές, πολλὴ δὲ κατʼ ὀφθαλμῶν χέετʼ ἀχλύς. 4.1526. αὐτίκα δὲ κλίνας δαπέδῳ βεβαρηότα γυῖα 4.1527. ψύχετʼ ἀμηχανίῃ· ἕταροι δέ μιν ἀμφαγέροντο 4.1528. ἥρως τʼ Αἰσονίδης, ἀδινῇ περιθαμβέες ἄτῃ. 4.1529. οὐδὲ μὲν οὐδʼ ἐπὶ τυτθὸν ἀποφθίμενός περ ἔμελλεν 4.1530. κεῖσθαι ὑπʼ ἠελίῳ. πύθεσκε γὰρ ἔνδοθι σάρκας 4.1531. ἰὸς ἄφαρ, μυδόωσα δʼ ἀπὸ χροὸς ἔρρεε λάχνη. 4.1532. αἶψα δὲ χαλκείῃσι βαθὺν τάφον ἐξελάχαινον 4.1533. ἐσσυμένως μακέλῃσιν· ἐμοιρήσαντο δὲ χαίτας 4.1534. αὐτοὶ ὁμῶς κοῦραί τε, νέκυν ἐλεεινὰ παθόντα 4.1535. μυρόμενοι· τρὶς δʼ ἀμφὶ σὺν ἔντεσι δινηθέντες 4.1536. εὖ κτερέων ἴσχοντα, χυτὴν ἐπὶ γαῖαν ἔθεντο.
4. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5.385-5.397, 5.554 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.498-1.502, 3.154-3.171, 7.37-7.45, 7.96-7.101, 8.617-8.731, 8.841-8.848 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay 3.154. “Hear, chiefs and princes, what your hopes shall be! 3.155. The Isle of Crete, abode of lofty Jove 3.156. rests in the middle sea. Thence Ida soars; 3.157. there is the cradle of our race. It boasts 3.158. a hundred cities, seats of fruitful power. 3.159. Thence our chief sire, if duly I recall 3.160. the olden tale, King Teucer sprung, who first 3.161. touched on the Trojan shore, and chose his seat 3.162. of kingly power. There was no Ilium then 3.163. nor towered Pergama; in lowly vales 3.164. their dwelling; hence the ancient worship given 3.165. to the Protectress of Mount Cybele 3.166. mother of Gods, what time in Ida's grove 3.167. the brazen Corybantic cymbals clang 3.168. or sacred silence guards her mystery 3.169. and lions yoked her royal chariot draw. 3.170. Up, then, and follow the behests divine! 3.171. Pour offering to the winds, and point your keels 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered 7.96. Over her broidered snood it sparkling flew 7.97. lighting her queenly tresses and her crown 7.98. of jewels rare: then, wrapt in flaming cloud 7.99. from hall to hall the fire-god's gift she flung. 7.100. This omen dread and wonder terrible 7.101. was rumored far: for prophet-voices told 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 8.626. in safety stands, I call not Trojan power 8.627. vanquished or fallen. But to help thy war 8.628. my small means match not thy redoubled name. 8.629. Yon Tuscan river is my bound. That way 8.630. Rutulia thrusts us hard and chafes our wall 8.631. with loud, besieging arms. But I propose 8.632. to league with thee a numerous array 8.633. of kings and mighty tribes, which fortune strange 8.634. now brings to thy defence. Thou comest here 8.635. because the Fates intend. Not far from ours 8.636. a city on an ancient rock is seen 8.637. Agylla, which a warlike Lydian clan 8.638. built on the Tuscan hills. It prospered well 8.639. for many a year, then under the proud yoke 8.640. of King Mezentius it came and bore 8.641. his cruel sway. Why tell the loathsome deeds 8.642. and crimes unspeakable the despot wrought? 8.643. May Heaven requite them on his impious head 8.644. and on his children! For he used to chain 8.645. dead men to living, hand on hand was laid 8.646. and face on face,—torment incredible! 8.647. Till, locked in blood-stained, horrible embrace 8.648. a lingering death they found. But at the last 8.649. his people rose in furious despair 8.650. and while he blasphemously raged, assailed 8.651. his life and throne, cut down his guards 8.652. and fired his regal dwellings; he, the while 8.653. escaped immediate death and fied away 8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence 8.655. in Turnus hospitality. To-day 8.656. Etruria, to righteous anger stirred 8.657. demands with urgent arms her guilty King. 8.658. To their large host, Aeneas, I will give 8.659. an added strength, thyself. For yonder shores 8.660. re-echo with the tumult and the cry 8.661. of ships in close array; their eager lords 8.662. are clamoring for battle. But the song 8.663. of the gray omen-giver thus declares 8.664. their destiny: ‘O goodly princes born 8.665. of old Maeonian lineage! Ye that are 8.666. the bloom and glory of an ancient race 8.667. whom just occasions now and noble rage 8.668. enflame against Mezentius your foe 8.669. it is decreed that yonder nation proud 8.670. hall never submit to chiefs Italian-born. 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true. 8.841. to lore inspired and prophesying song 8.842. fore-reading things to come. He pictured there 8.843. Iulus' destined line of glorious sons 8.844. marshalled for many a war. In cavern green 8.845. haunt of the war-god, lay the mother-wolf; 8.846. the twin boy-sucklings at her udders played 8.847. nor feared such nurse; with long neck backward thrown 8.848. he fondled each, and shaped with busy tongue
6. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.542-1.543, 1.744-1.751, 2.216-2.310, 2.314, 2.353-2.356, 2.587-2.628, 3.73-3.74, 3.86, 3.313-3.458, 4.25-4.50, 4.374-4.376, 5.1-5.237, 5.239-5.276, 5.289-5.290, 5.299, 5.329, 5.333-5.351, 5.392, 5.415-5.454, 5.678-5.679, 6.369-6.371, 6.490-6.494, 6.496-6.502, 7.92, 7.223-7.236, 7.238-7.239, 7.254-7.255, 7.293-7.294, 7.323-7.325, 7.348-7.349, 7.461, 8.414-8.446 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 238
aea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122
aeetes Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122, 129, 148, 237, 238
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
amycus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 237
anairesis Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
aphrodite (see also venus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129
apollo (see also phoebus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 238
apollonius rhodius, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
apollonius rhodius, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 129
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
argonauts Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
aristeia Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
artemis (see also diana) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 208
bellona Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
cenotaph Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
circe Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129
civil war Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
colchian/colchians Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
colchis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 122, 129, 148, 237, 238
corinth Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
creusa Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
cybele Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
cyzicus, nyctomachia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
cyzicus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
diana (see also artemis) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129, 208
dido Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 208
diodorus siculus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129
dionysius scytobrachion Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129
doliones Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
ekphrasis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
erato Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
euripides Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
fear, and anger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
foreshadowing Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 237, 315
ghosts Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
golden fleece Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122, 148, 237
hecate Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129, 208
helen Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129
helle Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
hellespont Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
hercules Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 237
homer Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 129, 208, 315
hylas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
hypsipyle Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
jason Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 148
juno, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 122, 148
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122, 238
laomedon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 237, 238
lemnos Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
libyan goddesses Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
mars Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
medea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122, 129, 208, 237, 315; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
minerva (see also athena, pallas)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
mopsus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
nausicaa Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 208, 315
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 208, 315
pallas (see also athena, minerva)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 148, 208
peleus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
penates Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
perses Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122, 129, 148, 238
peuce Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 238
phrixus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122, 237, 238; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
priam Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 238
proserpina Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 208
seneca, thy. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 109
seneca the younger Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
silence Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
simile Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 208, 315
sol Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
sophocles Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 237
speech, collective Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
sthenelus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
styrus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 122
suicide' Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
teichoskopia Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 129
thoas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120
tiphys Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 179
tragedy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315
troy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 237, 238
valerius flaccus, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
valerius flaccus, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
valerius flaccus, syncopated narration in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 78
venus (see also aphrodite) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 129
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 120, 122, 208, 315
vulcan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 315