Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11049
Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 2.17-2.427
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.396-1.400, 1.590-1.594, 15.18-15.24 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.396. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.397. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.398. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.399. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.400. /But you came, goddess, and freed him from his bonds, when you had quickly called to high Olympus him of the hundred hands, whom the gods call Briareus, but all men Aegaeon; for he is mightier than his father. He sat down by the side of the son of Cronos, exulting in his glory 1.590. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.591. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.592. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.593. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.594. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 15.18. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.19. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.20. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.21. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.22. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.23. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.24. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart
2. Homer, Odyssey, 8.266-8.366 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Bacchae, 822-845, 929, 821 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

821. στεῖλαί νυν ἀμφὶ χρωτὶ βυσσίνους πέπλους. Πενθεύς 821. Put linen clothes on your body then. Pentheu
4. Euripides, Helen, 1228, 1227 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1227. ἐν εὐμαρεῖ γοῦν σὴν κασιγνήτην λαθεῖν. 1227. It is certainly easy to escape your sister’s notice! Theoklymeno
5. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.609-1.639, 4.1049-4.1052 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.609. ἔνθʼ ἄμυδις πᾶς δῆμος ὑπερβασίῃσι γυναικῶν 1.610. νηλειῶς δέδμητο παροιχομένῳ λυκάβαντι. 1.611. δὴ γὰρ κουριδίας μὲν ἀπηνήναντο γυναῖκας 1.612. ἀνέρες ἐχθήραντες, ἔχον δʼ ἐπὶ ληιάδεσσιν 1.613. τρηχὺν ἔρον, ἃς αὐτοὶ ἀγίνεον ἀντιπέρηθεν 1.614. Θρηικίην δῃοῦντες· ἐπεὶ χόλος αἰνὸς ὄπαζεν 1.615. Κύπιδος, οὕνεκά μιν γεράων ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἄτισσαν. 1.616. ὦ μέλεαι, ζήλοιό τʼ ἐπισμυγερῶς ἀκόρητοι. 1.617. οὐκ οἶον σὺν τῇσιν ἑοὺς ἔρραισαν ἀκοίτας 1.618. ἀμφʼ εὐνῇ, πᾶν δʼ ἄρσεν ὁμοῦ γένος, ὥς κεν ὀπίσσω 1.619. μήτινα λευγαλέοιο φόνου τίσειαν ἀμοιβήν. 1.620. οἴη δʼ ἐκ πασέων γεραροῦ περιφείσατο πατρὸς 1.621. Ὑψιπύλεια Θόαντος, ὃ δὴ κατὰ δῆμον ἄνασσεν· 1.622. λάρνακι δʼ ἐν κοίλῃ μιν ὕπερθʼ ἁλὸς ἧκε φέρεσθαι 1.623. αἴ κε φύγῃ. καὶ τὸν μὲν ἐς Οἰνοίην ἐρύσαντο 1.624. πρόσθεν, ἀτὰρ Σίκινόν γε μεθύστερον αὐδηθεῖσαν 1.625. νῆσον, ἐπακτῆρες, Σικίνου ἄπο, τόν ῥα Θόαντι 1.626. νηιὰς Οἰνοίη νύμφη τέκεν εὐνηθεῖσα. 1.627. τῇσι δὲ βουκόλιαί τε βοῶν χάλκειά τε δύνειν 1.628. τεύχεα, πυροφόρους τε διατμήξασθαι ἀροὔρας 1.629. ῥηίτερον πάσῃσιν Ἀθηναίης πέλεν ἔργων 1.630. οἷς αἰεὶ τὸ πάροιθεν ὁμίλεον. ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἔμπης 1.631. ἦ θαμὰ δὴ πάπταινον ἐπὶ πλατὺν ὄμμασι πόντον 1.632. δείματι λευγαλέῳ, ὁπότε Θρήικες ἴασιν. 1.633. τῶ καὶ ὅτʼ ἐγγύθι νήσου ἐρεσσομένην ἴδον Ἀργώ 1.634. αὐτίκα πασσυδίῃ πυλέων ἔκτοσθε Μυρίνης 1.635. δήια τεύχεα δῦσαι ἐς αἰγιαλὸν προχέοντο 1.636. Θυιάσιν ὠμοβόροις ἴκελαι· φὰν γάρ που ἱκάνειν 1.637. Θρήικας· ἡ δʼ ἅμα τῇσι Θοαντιὰς Ὑψιπύλεια 1.638. δῦνʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσι πατρός. ἀμηχανίῃ δʼ ἐχέοντο 1.639. ἄφθογγοι· τοῖόν σφιν ἐπὶ δέος ᾐωρεῖτο. 4.1049. δερκόμενοι τείνουσαν ἀμήχανον· ἀλλά κε πᾶσιν 4.1050. κῶας ἑλεῖν μεμαῶτες, ἐμίξατε δούρατα Κόλχοις 4.1051. αὐτῷ τʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι· νῦν δʼ ἐλάθεσθε 4.1052. ἠνορέης, ὅτε μοῦνοι ἀποτμηγέντες ἔασιν.’
6. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.640-6.646 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.223-1.296, 4.173-4.197, 4.666, 7.385-7.387, 7.389-7.390, 7.392-7.405 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.223. rises a straight-stemmed grove of dense, dark shade. 1.224. Fronting on these a grotto may be seen 1.225. o'erhung by steep cliffs; from its inmost wall 1.226. clear springs gush out; and shelving seats it has 1.227. of unhewn stone, a place the wood-nymphs love. 1.228. In such a port, a weary ship rides free 1.230. Hither Aeneas of his scattered fleet 1.231. aving but seven, into harbor sailed; 1.232. with passionate longing for the touch of land 1.233. forth leap the Trojans to the welcome shore 1.234. and fling their dripping limbs along the ground. 1.235. Then good Achates smote a flinty stone 1.236. ecured a flashing spark, heaped on light leaves 1.237. and with dry branches nursed the mounting flame. 1.238. Then Ceres' gift from the corrupting sea 1.239. they bring away; and wearied utterly 1.240. ply Ceres' cunning on the rescued corn 1.241. and parch in flames, and mill 'twixt two smooth stones. 1.242. Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched 1.243. the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there 1.244. torm-buffeted, might sail within his ken 1.245. with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners 1.246. or Capys or Caicus armor-clad 1.247. upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; 1.248. but while he looks, three stags along the shore 1.249. come straying by, and close behind them comes 1.250. the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale 1.251. in one long line. Aeneas stopped and seized 1.252. his bow and swift-winged arrows, which his friend 1.253. trusty Achates, close beside him bore. 1.254. His first shafts brought to earth the lordly heads 1.255. of the high-antlered chiefs; his next assailed 1.256. the general herd, and drove them one and all 1.257. in panic through the leafy wood, nor ceased 1.258. the victory of his bow, till on the ground 1.259. lay seven huge forms, one gift for every ship. 1.260. Then back to shore he sped, and to his friends 1.261. distributed the spoil, with that rare wine 1.262. which good Acestes while in Sicily 1.263. had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away 1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 1.267. calamity till now. O, ye have borne 1.268. far heavier sorrow: Jove will make an end 1.269. also of this. Ye sailed a course hard by 1.270. infuriate Scylla's howling cliffs and caves. 1.271. Ye knew the Cyclops' crags. Lift up your hearts! 1.272. No more complaint and fear! It well may be 1.273. ome happier hour will find this memory fair. 1.274. Through chance and change and hazard without end 1.275. our goal is Latium ; where our destinies 1.276. beckon to blest abodes, and have ordained 1.277. that Troy shall rise new-born! Have patience all! 1.279. Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care 1.280. feigned hopes upon his forehead firm he wore 1.281. and locked within his heart a hero's pain. 1.282. Now round the welcome trophies of his chase 1.283. they gather for a feast. Some flay the ribs 1.284. and bare the flesh below; some slice with knives 1.285. and on keen prongs the quivering strips impale 1.286. place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. 1.287. Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green 1.288. they rally their lost powers, and feast them well 1.289. on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done 1.291. in long discourse of their lost mates they tell 1.292. 'twixt hopes and fears divided; for who knows 1.293. whether the lost ones live, or strive with death 1.294. or heed no more whatever voice may call? 1.295. Chiefly Aeneas now bewails his friends 1.296. Orontes brave and fallen Amycus 4.173. black storm-clouds with a burst of heavy hail 4.174. along their way; and as the huntsmen speed 4.175. to hem the wood with snares, I will arouse 4.176. all heaven with thunder. The attending train 4.177. hall scatter and be veiled in blinding dark 4.178. while Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.179. to the same cavern fly. My auspices 4.180. I will declare—if thou alike wilt bless; 4.181. and yield her in true wedlock for his bride. 4.182. Such shall their spousal be!” To Juno's will 4.183. Cythera's Queen inclined assenting brow 4.184. and laughed such guile to see. Aurora rose 4.185. and left the ocean's rim. The city's gates 4.186. pour forth to greet the morn a gallant train 4.187. of huntsmen, bearing many a woven snare 4.188. and steel-tipped javelin; while to and fro 4.189. run the keen-scented dogs and Libyan squires. 4.190. The Queen still keeps her chamber; at her doors 4.191. the Punic lords await; her palfrey, brave 4.192. in gold and purple housing, paws the ground 4.193. and fiercely champs the foam-flecked bridle-rein. 4.194. At last, with numerous escort, forth she shines: 4.195. her Tyrian pall is bordered in bright hues 4.196. her quiver, gold; her tresses are confined 4.197. only with gold; her robes of purple rare 4.666. “I know a way—O, wish thy sister joy!— 7.385. But nay! Though flung forth from their native land 7.386. I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed 7.387. dared give them chase, and on that exiled few 7.389. with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed 7.390. Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? 7.392. within their prayed-for land delectable 7.393. afe from the seas and me! Mars once had power 7.394. the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove 7.395. to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er 7.396. the land of Calydon. What crime so foul 7.397. was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? 7.398. But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes 7.399. have ventured each bold stroke my power could find 7.400. and every shift essayed,—behold me now 7.401. outdone by this Aeneas! If so weak 7.402. my own prerogative of godhead be 7.403. let me seek strength in war, come whence it will! 7.404. If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call. 7.405. To bar him from his Latin throne exceeds
8. Vergil, Georgics, 1.501-1.502 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.502. As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise
9. Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.617-7.646, 8.674, 8.698, 8.722 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Seneca The Younger, Medea, 396, 395 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Statius, Thebais, 4.677, 5.1-5.16, 5.23, 5.28-5.498 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.5, 1.503-1.573, 1.742, 1.812-1.814, 2.1-2.99, 2.101-2.427, 2.441-2.442, 2.497-2.550, 2.659-2.662, 3.18-3.261, 3.300-3.301, 3.306-3.308, 3.455, 3.581-3.593, 4.89, 5.177-5.216, 5.624-5.648, 6.1-6.426, 7.248-7.250 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.38.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.38.8. When you have turned from Eleusis to Boeotia you come to the Plataean land, which borders on Attica . Formerly Eleutherae formed the boundary on the side towards Attica, but when it came over to the Athenians henceforth the boundary of Boeotia was Cithaeron. The reason why the people of Eleutherae came over was not because they were reduced by war, but because they desired to share Athenian citizenship and hated the Thebans. In this plain is a temple of Dionysus, from which the old wooden image was carried off to Athens . The image at Eleutherae at the present day is a copy of the old one.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 187
acastus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
aeetes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 161
aeson Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
alcimede Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
alexandria Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), and valerius flaccus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280
amata Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 155
amazons Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
aphrodite Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280
apollonius rhodius, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
apollonius rhodius, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
argo, as first ship Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 330
argonauts Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
arkteia festival, brauron Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 158
auchus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 187
bacchic rites, conflation with wedding and burial rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153
bacchic rites, dido in vergils aeneid as bacchant Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 152
bacchic rites, in vergils aeneid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
bacchic rites, military imagery and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 151, 152
bacchic rites, negation of marriage and domesticity in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151, 152
bacchic rites, processions Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157
bacchic rites, purification associated with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157
bacchus/dionysus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 151, 153, 154, 155
bacchus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
burials and mourning, bacchic rites conflated with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153
burials and mourning, hypsipyles fake burial of thoas in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
circe Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 316
civil war Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161
colchis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 130; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161, 316; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
collective action, female Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 151
conflations of womens rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153, 158
corinth Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
cretheus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
cybele Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154
cyzicus, nyctomachia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161
diana/artemis Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 155
dido Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 152
digression Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
disorientation Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
doliones Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
dryope Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
egypt, escapist fantasy Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
etiology Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
euripides Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 330
fama/rumor Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151
fama Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 80
fate Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280
feminization/effeminacy Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 154, 155
furies Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 152
geography Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
golden fleece Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79
hercules Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
hesione Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
hispala (faecenia hispala) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 158
hylas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
hypsipyle, as female exemplum of pietas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 158
hypsipyle, as narrator of her own story (in statius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
hypsipyle, as victimized other Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148
hypsipyle, crossdressing of thoas (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 154, 155
hypsipyle, equivalent to the nile god Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
hypsipyle, fake burial of thoas (in statius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
hypsipyle, feminization/ ephebization of thoas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154, 155
hypsipyle, hiding of thoas in bacchic temple (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 153, 154, 155, 159
hypsipyle, hispala in livys bacchanalian narrative and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 158
hypsipyle, in apollonius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 150, 159
hypsipyle, in euripides hypsipyle Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 149, 159
hypsipyle, in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159
hypsipyle, in valerius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159
hypsipyle, jason/argonauts and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 149, 159
hypsipyle, lemnian womens massacre of men Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153
hypsipyle, purification rite and escape of thoas to tauris (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157, 158, 159
hypsipyle, ritual contexts for Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
hypsipyle, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 151, 152, 155, 159
hypsipyle Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161, 330; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159
intertextuality, hypsipyle story and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 150, 151, 155, 158, 159
iolcus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
iphigeneia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157, 158
itinerary Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
itys Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
jason Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80, 130; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 161
jason and the argonauts Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 149, 159
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
jupiter Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 161
landmarks Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
landscapes Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
laomedon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 161
lavinia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155
lemnian maenads Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153
lemnian women Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 187
lemnos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80, 130; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161, 316, 330; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
livys bacchanalian narrative, hypsipyle compared to hispala in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 158
logos, logoi, and statius Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
lucan, civil war Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 161
magical ritual Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
male offspring, bacchic killing of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 149, 152
mars Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80, 130; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161
medea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 316; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 187
metanarrative perspectives Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
minerva Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79
mitra Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154, 155
nile, and grain supply (annona) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
nile, inundation (flood) of the Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
nile, langia Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 171
omophagia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 149
opheltes Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
orestes Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157, 158
orpheus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 330
pan Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
pelias, murder of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
pelias Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 155, 158
perses Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 130
phasis Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
philomela and procne, hypsipyle compared Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
philomela and procne, killing and consumption of itys Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
phineus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
pietas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 158
pompey Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
priam Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
primitivism Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
purification and bacchic rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157
ritual corruption/perversion/distortion Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 156
rivers Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
rumor/fama Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151
scythia Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 454
seneca (younger) Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 187
seneca the younger Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 316
silence Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
sparagmos Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 149, 152, 158
speech, collective Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
statius, thebaid, hypsipyle in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159
statius, thebaid, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147
statius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 330
thessaly Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
thoas, father of hypsipyle Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
thoas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 161
thrace Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79
tragedy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 316, 330
transvestism and cross-dressing, of thoas by hypsipyle Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 154, 155
troy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161
valerius flaccus, and apollonius rhodius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
valerius flaccus, civil war in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130
valerius flaccus, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
valerius flaccus, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80
venus, and corpse abuse Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 187
venus/aphrodite Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 151, 152, 156
venus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 79, 80, 130
venus (see also aphrodite) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161, 316
vergil, aeneid, bacchic rites in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
vergil, aeneid, hypsipyle story, valerius and statius versions of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 151, 152, 155, 159
vergil, aeneid, servius commentary on Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154
vergil, aeneid, statius and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 161
vulcan Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 130; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 161
weddings and marriage, bacchic negation of marriage and domesticity Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151, 152
weddings and marriage, bacchic rites conflated with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153
womens rituals and agency in roman literature, collective action, female' Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
womens rituals and agency in roman literature, collective action, female Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151
zeus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280