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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11049
Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 2.1-2.5
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 16.431-16.461 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

16.431. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.432. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.433. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.434. /even so with cries rushed they one against the other. And the son of crooked-counselling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spake to Hera, his sister and his wife:Ah, woe is me, for that it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! 16.435. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.436. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.437. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.438. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. 16.439. /And in twofold wise is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he liveth and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius. Then ox-eyed queenly Hera answered him: 16.440. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.441. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.442. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.443. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.444. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart: 16.445. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.446. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.447. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.448. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.449. /if thou send Sarpedon living to his house, bethink thee lest hereafter some other god also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict; for many there be fighting around the great city of Priam that are sons of the immortals, and among the gods wilt thou send dread wrath. 16.450. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.451. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.452. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.453. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.454. /But and if he be dear to thee, and thine heart be grieved, suffer thou him verily to be slain in the fierce conflict beneath the hands of Patroclus, son of Menoetius; but when his soul and life have left him, then send thou Death and sweet Sleep to bear him away 16.455. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.456. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.457. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.458. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.459. /until they come to the land of wide Lycia; and there shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead. So spake she, and the father of men and gods failed to hearken. Howbeit he shed bloody rain-drops on the earth 16.460. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon; 16.461. /shewing honour to his dear son—his own son whom Patroclus was about to slay in the deep-soiled land of Troy, far from his native land.Now when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then verily did Patroclus smite glorious Thrasymelus, that was the valiant squire of the prince Sarpedon;
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 822-845, 929, 821 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

821. στεῖλαί νυν ἀμφὶ χρωτὶ βυσσίνους πέπλους. Πενθεύς 821. Put linen clothes on your body then. Pentheu
3. Euripides, Helen, 1228, 1227 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1227. ἐν εὐμαρεῖ γοῦν σὴν κασιγνήτην λαθεῖν. 1227. It is certainly easy to escape your sister’s notice! Theoklymeno
4. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.609-1.639, 4.450-4.481 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.609. ἔνθʼ ἄμυδις πᾶς δῆμος ὑπερβασίῃσι γυναικῶν 1.610. νηλειῶς δέδμητο παροιχομένῳ λυκάβαντι. 1.611. δὴ γὰρ κουριδίας μὲν ἀπηνήναντο γυναῖκας 1.612. ἀνέρες ἐχθήραντες, ἔχον δʼ ἐπὶ ληιάδεσσιν 1.613. τρηχὺν ἔρον, ἃς αὐτοὶ ἀγίνεον ἀντιπέρηθεν 1.614. Θρηικίην δῃοῦντες· ἐπεὶ χόλος αἰνὸς ὄπαζεν 1.615. Κύπιδος, οὕνεκά μιν γεράων ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἄτισσαν. 1.616. ὦ μέλεαι, ζήλοιό τʼ ἐπισμυγερῶς ἀκόρητοι. 1.617. οὐκ οἶον σὺν τῇσιν ἑοὺς ἔρραισαν ἀκοίτας 1.618. ἀμφʼ εὐνῇ, πᾶν δʼ ἄρσεν ὁμοῦ γένος, ὥς κεν ὀπίσσω 1.619. μήτινα λευγαλέοιο φόνου τίσειαν ἀμοιβήν. 1.620. οἴη δʼ ἐκ πασέων γεραροῦ περιφείσατο πατρὸς 1.621. Ὑψιπύλεια Θόαντος, ὃ δὴ κατὰ δῆμον ἄνασσεν· 1.622. λάρνακι δʼ ἐν κοίλῃ μιν ὕπερθʼ ἁλὸς ἧκε φέρεσθαι 1.623. αἴ κε φύγῃ. καὶ τὸν μὲν ἐς Οἰνοίην ἐρύσαντο 1.624. πρόσθεν, ἀτὰρ Σίκινόν γε μεθύστερον αὐδηθεῖσαν 1.625. νῆσον, ἐπακτῆρες, Σικίνου ἄπο, τόν ῥα Θόαντι 1.626. νηιὰς Οἰνοίη νύμφη τέκεν εὐνηθεῖσα. 1.627. τῇσι δὲ βουκόλιαί τε βοῶν χάλκειά τε δύνειν 1.628. τεύχεα, πυροφόρους τε διατμήξασθαι ἀροὔρας 1.629. ῥηίτερον πάσῃσιν Ἀθηναίης πέλεν ἔργων 1.630. οἷς αἰεὶ τὸ πάροιθεν ὁμίλεον. ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἔμπης 1.631. ἦ θαμὰ δὴ πάπταινον ἐπὶ πλατὺν ὄμμασι πόντον 1.632. δείματι λευγαλέῳ, ὁπότε Θρήικες ἴασιν. 1.633. τῶ καὶ ὅτʼ ἐγγύθι νήσου ἐρεσσομένην ἴδον Ἀργώ 1.634. αὐτίκα πασσυδίῃ πυλέων ἔκτοσθε Μυρίνης 1.635. δήια τεύχεα δῦσαι ἐς αἰγιαλὸν προχέοντο 1.636. Θυιάσιν ὠμοβόροις ἴκελαι· φὰν γάρ που ἱκάνειν 1.637. Θρήικας· ἡ δʼ ἅμα τῇσι Θοαντιὰς Ὑψιπύλεια 1.638. δῦνʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσι πατρός. ἀμηχανίῃ δʼ ἐχέοντο 1.639. ἄφθογγοι· τοῖόν σφιν ἐπὶ δέος ᾐωρεῖτο. 4.450. πῶς γὰρ δὴ μετιόντα κακῷ ἐδάμασσεν ὀλέθρῳ 4.451. Ἄψυρτον; τὸ γὰρ ἧμιν ἐπισχερὼ ἦεν ἀοιδῆς. 4.452. ἦμος ὅτʼ Ἀρτέμιδος νήσῳ ἔνι τήνγʼ ἐλίποντο 4.453. συνθεσίῃ. τοὶ μέν ῥα διάνδιχα νηυσὶν ἔκελσαν 4.454. σφωιτέραις κρινθέντες· ὁ δʼ ἐς λόχον ᾖεν Ἰήσων 4.455. δέγμενος Ἄψυρτόν τε καὶ οὓς ἐξαῦτις ἑταίρους. 4.456. αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ αἰνοτάτῃσιν ὑποσχεσίῃσι δολωθεὶς 4.457. καρπαλίμως ᾗ νηὶ διὲξ ἁλὸς οἶδμα περήσας 4.458. νύχθʼ ὕπο λυγαίην ἱερῆς ἐπεβήσατο νήσου· 4.459. οἰόθι δʼ ἀντικρὺ μετιὼν πειρήσατο μύθοις 4.460. εἷο κασιγνήτης, ἀταλὸς πάις οἷα χαράδρης 4.461. χειμερίης, ἣν οὐδὲ διʼ αἰζηοὶ περόωσιν. 4.462. εἴ κε δόλον ξείνοισιν ἐπʼ ἀνδράσι τεχνήσαιτο. 4.463. καὶ τὼ μὲν τὰ ἕκαστα συνῄνεον ἀλλήλοισιν· 4.464. αὐτίκα δʼ Αἰσονίδης πυκινοῦ ἐξᾶλτο λόχοιο 4.465. γυμνὸν ἀνασχόμενος παλάμῃ ξίφος· αἶψα δὲ κούρη 4.466. ἔμπαλιν ὄμματʼ ἔνεικε, καλυψαμένη ὀθόνῃσιν 4.467. μὴ φόνον ἀθρήσειε κασιγνήτοιο τυπέντος. 4.468. τὸν δʼ ὅγε, βουτύπος ὥστε μέγαν κερεαλκέα ταῦρον 4.469. πλῆξεν ὀπιπεύσας νηοῦ σχεδόν, ὅν ποτʼ ἔδειμαν 4.470. Ἀρτέμιδι Βρυγοὶ περιναιέται ἀντιπέρηθεν. 4.471. τοῦ ὅγʼ ἐνὶ προδόμῳ γνὺξ ἤριπε· λοίσθια δʼ ἥρως 4.472. θυμὸν ἀναπνείων χερσὶν μέλαν ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 4.473. αἷμα κατʼ ὠτειλὴν ὑποΐσχετο· τῆς δὲ καλύπτρην 4.474. ἀργυφέην καὶ πέπλον ἀλευομένης ἐρύθηνεν. 4.475. ὀξὺ δὲ πανδαμάτωρ λοξῷ ἴδεν οἷον ἔρεξαν 4.476. ὄμματι νηλειὴς ὀλοφώιον ἔργον Ἐρινύς. 4.477. ἥρως δʼ Αἰσονίδης ἐξάργματα τάμνε θανόντος 4.478. τρὶς δʼ ἀπέλειξε φόνου, τρὶς δʼ ἐξ ἄγος ἔπτυσʼ ὀδόντων 4.479. ἣ θέμις αὐθέντῃσι δολοκτασίας ἱλάεσθαι. 4.480. ὑγρὸν δʼ ἐν γαίῃ κρύψεν νέκυν, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 4.481. κείαται ὀστέα κεῖνα μετʼ ἀνδράσιν Ἀψυρτεῦσιν.
5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.640-6.646 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.173-4.197, 4.666, 5.249-5.257, 6.585-6.586, 7.385-7.387, 7.389-7.390, 7.392-7.405 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.173. black storm-clouds with a burst of heavy hail 4.174. along their way; and as the huntsmen speed 4.175. to hem the wood with snares, I will arouse 4.176. all heaven with thunder. The attending train 4.177. hall scatter and be veiled in blinding dark 4.178. while Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.179. to the same cavern fly. My auspices 4.180. I will declare—if thou alike wilt bless; 4.181. and yield her in true wedlock for his bride. 4.182. Such shall their spousal be!” To Juno's will 4.183. Cythera's Queen inclined assenting brow 4.184. and laughed such guile to see. Aurora rose 4.185. and left the ocean's rim. The city's gates 4.186. pour forth to greet the morn a gallant train 4.187. of huntsmen, bearing many a woven snare 4.188. and steel-tipped javelin; while to and fro 4.189. run the keen-scented dogs and Libyan squires. 4.190. The Queen still keeps her chamber; at her doors 4.191. the Punic lords await; her palfrey, brave 4.192. in gold and purple housing, paws the ground 4.193. and fiercely champs the foam-flecked bridle-rein. 4.194. At last, with numerous escort, forth she shines: 4.195. her Tyrian pall is bordered in bright hues 4.196. her quiver, gold; her tresses are confined 4.197. only with gold; her robes of purple rare 4.666. “I know a way—O, wish thy sister joy!— 5.249. But Mnestheus and Sergestus, coming last 5.250. have joyful hope enkindled in each heart 5.251. to pass the laggard Gyas. In the lead 5.252. Sergestus' ship shoots forth; and to the rock 5.253. runs boldly nigh; but not his whole long keel 5.254. may pass his rival; the projecting beak 5.255. is followed fast by Pristis' emulous prow. 5.256. Then, striding straight amidships through his crew 5.257. thus Mnestheus urged them on: “O Hector's friends! 6.585. Roamed through a mighty wood. The Trojan's eyes 6.586. Beheld her near him through the murky gloom 7.385. But nay! Though flung forth from their native land 7.386. I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed 7.387. dared give them chase, and on that exiled few 7.389. with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed 7.390. Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? 7.392. within their prayed-for land delectable 7.393. afe from the seas and me! Mars once had power 7.394. the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove 7.395. to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er 7.396. the land of Calydon. What crime so foul 7.397. was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? 7.398. But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes 7.399. have ventured each bold stroke my power could find 7.400. and every shift essayed,—behold me now 7.401. outdone by this Aeneas! If so weak 7.402. my own prerogative of godhead be 7.403. let me seek strength in war, come whence it will! 7.404. If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call. 7.405. To bar him from his Latin throne exceeds
7. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 1.9.27 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.9.27. Πελίας δὲ ἀπογνοὺς τὴν ὑποστροφὴν τῶν Ἀργοναυτῶν τὸν Αἴσονα κτείνειν ἤθελεν· ὁ δὲ αἰτησάμενος ἑαυτὸν ἀνελεῖν θυσίαν ἐπιτελῶν ἀδεῶς τοῦ ταυρείου σπασάμενος αἵματος 1 -- ἀπέθανεν. ἡ δὲ Ἰάσονος μήτηρ ἐπαρασαμένη Πελίᾳ, 2 -- νήπιον ἀπολιποῦσα παῖδα Πρόμαχον ἑαυτὴν ἀνήρτησε· Πελίας δὲ καὶ τὸν αὐτῇ καταλειφθέντα παῖδα ἀπέκτεινεν. ὁ δὲ Ἰάσων κατελθὼν τὸ μὲν δέρας ἔδωκε, περὶ ὧν δὲ ἠδικήθη μετελθεῖν ἐθέλων καιρὸν ἐξεδέχετο. καὶ τότε μὲν εἰς Ἰσθμὸν μετὰ τῶν ἀριστέων πλεύσας ἀνέθηκε τὴν ναῦν Ποσειδῶνι, αὖθις δὲ Μήδειαν παρακαλεῖ ζητεῖν ὅπως Πελίας αὐτῷ δίκας ὑπόσχῃ. ἡ δὲ εἰς τὰ βασίλεια τοῦ Πελίου παρελθοῦσα πείθει τὰς θυγατέρας αὐτοῦ τὸν πατέρα κρεουργῆσαι καὶ καθεψῆσαι, διὰ φαρμάκων αὐτὸν ἐπαγγελλομένη ποιήσειν νέον· καὶ τοῦ πιστεῦσαι χάριν κριὸν μελίσασα καὶ καθεψήσασα ἐποίησεν ἄρνα. αἱ δὲ πιστεύσασαι τὸν πατέρα κρεουργοῦσι καὶ καθέψουσιν. Ἄκαστος 3 -- δὲ μετὰ τῶν τὴν Ἰωλκὸν οἰκούντων τὸν πατέρα θάπτει, τὸν δὲ Ἰάσονα μετὰ τῆς Μηδείας τῆς Ἰωλκοῦ ἐκβάλλει.
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.674, 8.698, 8.722 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Statius, Thebais, 5.1-5.16, 5.23, 5.28-5.498 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.211-1.226, 1.574-1.665, 1.674-1.675, 1.693-1.721, 1.827-1.850, 2.2-2.427, 3.81-3.82, 4.15-4.17, 4.132, 4.637-4.710, 6.624-6.629, 6.740-6.751, 8.136-8.174, 8.247-8.251, 8.318-8.384 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.38.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.38.8. When you have turned from Eleusis to Boeotia you come to the Plataean land, which borders on Attica . Formerly Eleutherae formed the boundary on the side towards Attica, but when it came over to the Athenians henceforth the boundary of Boeotia was Cithaeron. The reason why the people of Eleutherae came over was not because they were reduced by war, but because they desired to share Athenian citizenship and hated the Thebans. In this plain is a temple of Dionysus, from which the old wooden image was carried off to Athens . The image at Eleutherae at the present day is a copy of the old one.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 376
acastus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 82
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147
aeson Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 162; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
alcimede Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
amata Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 155
anchises Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
animal, divine Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 376
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 162
argonautic, expedition Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 82
argonautic, journey/voyage Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 82
argonautic, narrative Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 82
arkteia festival, brauron Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 158
bacchic rites, conflation with wedding and burial rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153
bacchic rites, dido in vergils aeneid as bacchant Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 152
bacchic rites, in vergils aeneid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
bacchic rites, military imagery and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 151, 152
bacchic rites, negation of marriage and domesticity in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151, 152
bacchic rites, processions Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157
bacchic rites, purification associated with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157
bacchus/dionysus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 151, 153, 154, 155
bird Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
burials and mourning, bacchic rites conflated with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153
burials and mourning, hypsipyles fake burial of thoas in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
carthage Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147
civil war Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
closure Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
coda (see sphragis) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
colchis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147
collective action, female Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 151
conflations of womens rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153, 158
continuation Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 82
cybele Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147, 162
death, and closure Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
death Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
diana/artemis Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 155
dido Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 152
dionysios scytobrachion Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
dog Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
eagle Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
elysium Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 376
fama/rumor Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151
fate Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 283
feminization/effeminacy Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 154, 155
fratricide/fraternal conflict Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
furies Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 152
ganymede Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
hispala (faecenia hispala) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 158
hylas Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 283
hypsipyle, as female exemplum of pietas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 158
hypsipyle, as narrator of her own story (in statius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
hypsipyle, as victimized other Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148
hypsipyle, crossdressing of thoas (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 154, 155
hypsipyle, fake burial of thoas (in statius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
hypsipyle, feminization/ ephebization of thoas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154, 155
hypsipyle, hiding of thoas in bacchic temple (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 153, 154, 155, 159
hypsipyle, hispala in livys bacchanalian narrative and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 158
hypsipyle, in apollonius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 150, 159
hypsipyle, in euripides hypsipyle Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 149, 159
hypsipyle, in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159
hypsipyle, in valerius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159
hypsipyle, jason/argonauts and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 149, 159
hypsipyle, lemnian womens massacre of men Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153
hypsipyle, purification rite and escape of thoas to tauris (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157, 158, 159
hypsipyle, ritual contexts for Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
hypsipyle, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 151, 152, 155, 159
hypsipyle Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159
intertext(uality) Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
intertextuality, hypsipyle story and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 150, 151, 155, 158, 159
iphigeneia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157, 158
itys Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
jason Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147, 162; Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
jason and the argonauts Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 149, 159
juno Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 82
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147, 162
jupiter Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 283; Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
lament Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
lavinia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155
lemnian maenads Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153
livys bacchanalian narrative, hypsipyle compared to hispala in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 158
lucan, civil war Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
magic Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
magical ritual Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
male offspring, bacchic killing of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 149, 152
medea Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
mitra Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154, 155
mopsus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
omen Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
omophagia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 149
opheltes Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
orestes Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157, 158
pallas (see also athena, minerva)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147
pelias Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147, 376; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 82
pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 155, 158
philomela and procne, hypsipyle compared Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
philomela and procne, killing and consumption of itys Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
phineus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147
pietas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 158
pio, giovan battista (johannes baptista pius)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 376
pompey Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
priam Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152
purification and bacchic rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 155, 156, 157
reception Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 376
ring composition Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
ritual Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81, 82
ritual corruption/perversion/distortion Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 156
rumor/fama Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151
sacrifice Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
salmoneus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 162
sparagmos Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 149, 152, 158
statius, thebaid, hypsipyle in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159
statius, thebaid, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147
stoicism Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147
suicide Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 81
symplegades (cyanaean rocks) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 147, 162
transvestism and cross-dressing, of thoas by hypsipyle Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 153, 154, 155
valerius flaccus, pessimism\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 162
venus/aphrodite Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 150, 151, 152, 156
vergil, aeneid, bacchic rites in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
vergil, aeneid, hypsipyle story, valerius and statius versions of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 149, 151, 152, 155, 159
vergil, aeneid, servius commentary on Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 154
vergil, aeneid, statius and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147
virgil, aeneid Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 162; Mackay, Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica (2022) 154
weddings and marriage, bacchic negation of marriage and domesticity Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151, 152
weddings and marriage, bacchic rites conflated with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 152, 153
womens rituals and agency in roman literature, collective action, female' Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
womens rituals and agency in roman literature, collective action, female Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 151
zeus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 283