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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11049
Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.509
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15 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.396-1.400, 1.590-1.594, 8.479-8.481, 15.18-15.24 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.396. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.397. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.398. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.399. /For often I have heard you glorying in the halls of my father, and declaring that you alone among the immortals warded off shameful ruin from the son of Cronos, lord of the dark clouds, on the day when the other Olympians wished to put him in bonds, even Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. 1.400. /But you came, goddess, and freed him from his bonds, when you had quickly called to high Olympus him of the hundred hands, whom the gods call Briareus, but all men Aegaeon; for he is mightier than his father. He sat down by the side of the son of Cronos, exulting in his glory 1.590. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.591. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.592. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.593. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 1.594. /he caught me by the foot and hurled me from the heavenly threshold; the whole day long I was carried headlong, and at sunset I fell in Lemnos, and but little life was in me. There the Sintian folk quickly tended me for my fall. So he spoke, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, smiled 8.479. /on the day when at the sterns of the ships they shall be fighting in grimmest stress about Patroclus fallen; for thus it is ordained of heaven. But of thee I reck not in thine anger, no, not though thou shouldst go to the nethermost bounds of earth and sea, where abide Iapetus and Cronos 8.480. /and have joy neither in the rays of Helios Hyperion nor in any breeze, but deep Tartarus is round about them. Though thou shouldst fare even thither in thy wanderings, yet reck I not of thy wrath, seeing there is naught more shameless than thou. So said he; howbeit white-armed Hera spake no word in answer. 8.481. /and have joy neither in the rays of Helios Hyperion nor in any breeze, but deep Tartarus is round about them. Though thou shouldst fare even thither in thy wanderings, yet reck I not of thy wrath, seeing there is naught more shameless than thou. So said he; howbeit white-armed Hera spake no word in answer. 15.18. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.19. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.20. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.21. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.22. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.23. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.24. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart
2. Homer, Odyssey, 8.266-8.366 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.6-3.110, 3.113-3.166, 3.221-3.222, 3.275-3.303 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.7. μίμνον ἀριστῆες λελοχημένοι· αἱ δʼ ἐνόησαν 3.8. Ἥρη Ἀθηναίη τε, Διὸς δʼ αὐτοῖο καὶ ἄλλων 3.9. ἀθανάτων ἀπονόσφι θεῶν θάλαμόνδε κιοῦσαι 3.10. βούλευον· πείραζε δʼ Ἀθηναίην πάρος Ἥρη· 3.11. ‘αὐτὴ νῦν προτέρη, θύγατερ Διός, ἄρχεο βουλῆς. 3.12. τί χρέος; ἠὲ δόλον τινὰ μήσεαι, ᾧ κεν ἑλόντες 3.13. χρύσεον Αἰήταο μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα κῶας ἄγοιντο 3.14. ἦ καὶ τόνγʼ ἐπέεσσι παραιφάμενοι πεπίθοιεν 3.15. μειλιχίοις; ἦ γὰρ ὅγʼ ὑπερφίαλος πέλει αἰνῶς. 3.16. ἔμπης δʼ οὔτινα πεῖραν ἀποτρωπᾶσθαι ἔοικεν.’ 3.17. ὧς φάτο· τὴν δὲ παρᾶσσον Ἀθηναίη προσέειπεν· 3.18. ‘καὶ δʼ αὐτὴν ἐμὲ τοῖα μετὰ φρεσὶν ὁρμαίνουσαν 3.19. Ἤρη, ἀπηλεγέως ἐξείρεαι. ἀλλά τοι οὔπω 3.20. φράσσασθαι νοέω τοῦτον δόλον, ὅστις ὀνήσει 3.21. θυμὸν ἀριστήων· πολέας δʼ ἐπεδοίασα βουλάς.’ 3.22. ἦ, καὶ ἐπʼ οὔδεος αἵγε ποδῶν πάρος ὄμματʼ ἔπηξαν 3.23. ἄνδιχα πορφύρουσαι ἐνὶ σφίσιν· αὐτίκα δʼ Ἥρη 3.24. τοῖον μητιόωσα παροιτέρη ἔκφατο μῦθον· 3.25. ‘δεῦρʼ ἴομεν μετὰ Κύπριν· ἐπιπλόμεναι δέ μιν ἄμφω 3.26. παιδὶ ἑῷ εἰπεῖν ὀτρύνομεν, αἴ κε πίθηται 3.27. κούρην Αἰήτεω πολυφάρμακον οἷσι βέλεσσιν 3.28. θέλξαι ὀιστεύσας ἐπʼ Ἰήσονι. τὸν δʼ ἂν ὀίω 3.29. κείνης ἐννεσίῃσιν ἐς Ἑλλάδα κῶας ἀνάξειν.’ 3.30. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πυκινὴ δὲ συνεύαδε μῆτις Ἀθήνῃ 3.31. καί μιν ἔπειτʼ ἐξαῦτις ἀμείβετο μειλιχίοισιν· 3.32. ‘Ἥρη, νήιδα μέν με πατὴρ τέκε τοῖο βολάων 3.33. οὐδέ τινα χρειὼ θελκτήριον οἶδα πόθοιο. 3.34. εἰ δέ σοι αὐτῇ μῦθος ἐφανδάνει, ἦ τʼ ἂν ἔγωγε 3.35. ἑσποίμην· σὺ δέ κεν φαίης ἔπος ἀντιόωσα.’ 3.36. ἦ, καὶ ἀναΐξασαι ἐπὶ μέγα δῶμα νέοντο 3.37. Κύπριδος, ὅ ῥά τέ οἱ δεῖμεν πόσις ἀμφιγυήεις 3.38. ὁππότε μιν τὰ πρῶτα παραὶ Διὸς ἦγεν ἄκοιτιν. 3.39. ἕρκεα δʼ εἰσελθοῦσαι ὑπʼ αἰθούσῃ θαλάμοιο 3.40. ἔσταν, ἵνʼ ἐντύνεσκε θεὰ λέχος Ἡφαίστοιο. 3.41. ἀλλʼ ὁ μὲν ἐς χαλκεῶνα καὶ ἄκμονας ἦρι βεβήκει 3.42. νήσοιο πλαγκτῆς εὐρὺν μυχόν, ᾧ ἔνι πάντα 3.43. δαίδαλα χάλκευεν ῥιπῇ πυρόσʼ ἡ δʼ ἄρα μούνη 3.44. ἧστο δόμῳ δινωτὸν ἀνὰ θρόνον, ἄντα θυράων. 3.45. λευκοῖσιν δʼ ἑκάτερθε κόμας ἐπιειμένη ὤμοις 3.46. κόσμει χρυσείῃ διὰ κερκίδι, μέλλε δὲ μακροὺς 3.47. πλέξασθαι πλοκάμους· τὰς δὲ προπάροιθεν ἰδοῦσα 3.48. ἔσχεθεν, εἴσω τέ σφʼ ἐκάλει, καὶ ἀπὸ θρόνου ὦρτο 3.49. εἷσέ τʼ ἐνὶ κλισμοῖσιν· ἀτὰρ μετέπειτα καὶ αὐτὴ 3.50. ἵζανεν, ἀψήκτους δὲ χεροῖν ἀνεδήσατο χαίτας. 3.51. τοῖα δὲ μειδιόωσα προσέννεπεν αἱμυλίοισιν· 3.52. ‘Ἠθεῖαι, τίς δεῦρο νόος χρειω τε κομίζει 3.53. δηναιὰς αὔτως; τί δʼ ἱκάνετον, οὔτι πάρος γε 3.54. λίην φοιτίζουσαι, ἐπεὶ περίεστε θεάων;’ 3.55. τὴν δʼ Ἥρη τοίοισιν ἀμειβομένη προσέειπεν· 3.56. ‘Κερτομέεις· νῶιν δὲ κέαρ συνορίνεται ἄτῃ. 3.57. ἤδη γὰρ ποταμῷ ἐνὶ Φάσιδι νῆα κατίσχει 3.58. Αἰσονίδης, ἠδʼ ἄλλοι ὅσοι μετὰ κῶας ἕπονται. 3.59. τῶν ἤτοι πάντων μέν, ἐπεὶ πέλας ἔργον ὄρωρεν 3.60. δείδιμεν ἐκπάγλως, περὶ δʼ Αἰσονίδαο μάλιστα. 3.61. τὸν μὲν ἐγών, εἰ καί περ ἐς Ἄιδα ναυτίλληται 3.62. λυσόμενος χαλκέων Ἰξίονα νειόθι δεσμῶν 3.63. ῥύσομαι, ὅσσον ἐμοῖσιν ἐνὶ σθένος ἔπλετο γυίοις 3.64. ὄφρα μὴ ἐγγελάσῃ Πελίης κακὸν οἶτον ἀλύξας 3.65. ὅς μʼ ὑπερηνορέῃ θυέων ἀγέραστον ἔθηκεν. 3.66. καὶ δʼ ἄλλως ἔτι καὶ πρὶν ἐμοὶ μέγα φίλατʼ Ἰήσων 3.67. ἐξότʼ ἐπὶ προχοῇσιν ἅλις πλήθοντος Ἀναύρου 3.68. ἀνδρῶν εὐνομίης πειρωμένῃ ἀντεβόλησεν 3.69. θήρης ἐξανιών· νιφετῷ δʼ ἐπαλύνετο πάντα 3.70. οὔρεα καὶ σκοπιαὶ περιμήκεες, οἱ δὲ κατʼ αὐτῶν 3.71. χείμαρροι καναχηδὰ κυλινδόμενοι φορέοντο. 3.72. γρηὶ δέ μʼ εἰσαμένην ὀλοφύρατο, καί μʼ ἀναείρας 3.73. αὐτὸς ἑοῖς ὤμοισι διὲκ προαλὲς φέρεν ὕδωρ. 3.74. τῶ νύ μοι ἄλληκτον περιτίεται· οὐδέ κε λώβην 3.75. τίσειεν Πελίης, εἰ μή σύ γε νόστον ὀπάσσεις.’ 3.76. ὧς ηὔδα· Κύπριν δʼ ἐνεοστασίη λάβε μύθων. 3.77. ἅζετο δʼ ἀντομένην Ἥρην ἕθεν εἰσορόωσα 3.78. καί μιν ἔπειτʼ ἀγανοῖσι προσέννεπεν ἥγʼ ἐπέεσσιν· 3.79. ‘πότνα θεά, μή τοί τι κακώτερον ἄλλο πέλοιτο 3.80. Κύπριδος, εἰ δὴ σεῖο λιλαιομένης ἀθερίζω 3.81. ἢ ἔπος ἠέ τι ἔργον, ὅ κεν χέρες αἵγε κάμοιεν 3.82. ἠπεδαναί· καὶ μή τις ἀμοιβαίη χάρις ἔστω.’ 3.83. ὧς ἔφαθʼ· Ἥρη δʼ αὖτις ἐπιφραδέως ἀγορευσεν· 3.84. ‘οὔτι βίης χατέουσαι ἱκάνομεν, οὐδέ τι χειρῶν. 3.85. ἀλλʼ αὔτως ἀκέουσα τεῷ ἐπικέκλεο παιδὶ 3.86. παρθένον Αἰήτεω θέλξαι πόθῳ Αἰσονίδαο. 3.87. εἰ γάρ οἱ κείνη συμφράσσεται εὐμενέουσα 3.88. ῥηιδίως μιν ἑλόντα δέρος χρύσειον ὀίω 3.89. νοστήσειν ἐς Ἰωλκόν, ἐπεὶ δολόεσσα τέτυκται.’ 3.90. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· Κύπρις δὲ μετʼ ἀμφοτέρῃσιν ἔειπεν· 3.91. ‘Ἥρη, Ἀθηναίη τε, πίθοιτό κεν ὔμμι μάλιστα 3.92. ἢ ἐμοί. ὑμείων γὰρ ἀναιδήτῳ περ ἐόντι 3.93. τυτθή γʼ αἰδὼς ἔσσετʼ ἐν ὄμμασιν· αὐτὰρ ἐμεῖο 3.94. οὐκ ὄθεται, μάλα δʼ αἰὲν ἐριδμαίνων ἀθερίζει. 3.95. καὶ δή οἱ μενέηνα, περισχομένη κακότητι 3.96. αὐτοῖσιν τόξοισι δυσηχέας ἆξαι ὀιστοὺς 3.97. ἀμφαδίην. τοῖον γὰρ ἐπηπείλησε χαλεφθείς 3.98. εἰ μὴ τηλόθι χεῖρας, ἕως ἔτι θυμὸν ἐρύκει 3.99. ἕξω ἐμάς, μετέπειτά γʼ ἀτεμβοίμην ἑοῖ αὐτῇ.’ 3.100. ὧς φάτο· μείδησαν δὲ θεαί, καὶ ἐσέδρακον ἄντην 3.101. ἀλλήλαις. ἡ δʼ αὖτις ἀκηχεμένη προσέειπεν· 3.102. ‘ἄλλοις ἄλγεα τἀμὰ γέλως πέλει· οὐδέ τί με χρὴ 3.103. μυθεῖσθαι πάντεσσιν· ἅλις εἰδυῖα καὶ αὐτή. 3.104. νῦν δʼ ἐπεὶ ὔμμι φίλον τόδε δὴ πέλει ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 3.105. πειρήσω, καί μιν μειλίξομαι, οὐδʼ ἀπιθήσει.’ 3.106. ὧς φάτο· τὴν δʼ Ἥρη ῥαδινῆς ἐπεμάσσατο χειρός 3.107. ἦκα δὲ μειδιόωσα παραβλήδην προσέειπεν· 3.108. ‘οὕτω νῦν, Κυθέρεια, τόδε χρέος, ὡς ἀγορεύεις 3.109. ἔρξον ἄφαρ· καὶ μή τι χαλέπτεο, μηδʼ ἐρίδαινε 3.110. χωομένη σῷ παιδί· μεταλλήξει γὰρ ὀπίσσω.’ 3.113. βῆ ῥ̓ ἴμεν Οὐλύμποιο κατὰ πτύχας, εἴ μιν ἐφεύροι. 3.114. εὗρε δὲ τόνγʼ ἀπάνευθε Διὸς θαλερῇ ἐν ἀλωῇ 3.115. οὐκ οἶον, μετα καὶ Γανυμήδεα, τόν ῥά ποτε Ζεὺς 3.116. οὐρανῷ ἐγκατένασσεν ἐφέστιον ἀθανάτοισιν 3.117. κάλλεος ἱμερθείς. ἀμφʼ ἀστραγάλοισι δὲ τώγε 3.118. χρυσείοις, ἅ τε κοῦροι ὁμήθεες, ἑψιόωντο. 3.119. καί ῥ̓ ὁ μὲν ἤδη πάμπαν ἐνίπλεον ᾧ ὑπὸ μαζῷ 3.120. μάργος Ἔρως λαιῆς ὑποΐσχανε χειρὸς ἀγοστόν 3.121. ὀρθὸς ἐφεστηώς· γλυκερὸν δέ οἱ ἀμφὶ παρειὰς 3.122. χροιῇ θάλλεν ἔρευθος. ὁ δʼ ἐγγύθεν ὀκλαδὸν ἧστο 3.123. σῖγα κατηφιόων· δοιὼ δʼ ἔχεν, ἄλλον ἔτʼ αὔτως 3.124. ἄλλῳ ἐπιπροϊείς, κεχόλωτο δὲ καγχαλόωντι. 3.125. καὶ μὴν τούσγε παρᾶσσον ἐπὶ προτέροισιν ὀλέσσας 3.126. βῆ κενεαῖς σὺν χερσὶν ἀμήχανος, οὐδʼ ἐνόησεν 3.127. Κύπριν ἐπιπλομένην. ἡ δʼ ἀντίη ἵστατο παιδός 3.128. καί μιν ἄφαρ γναθμοῖο κατασχομένη προσέειπεν· 3.129. ‘τίπτʼ ἐπιμειδιάᾳς, ἄφατον κακόν; ἦέ μιν αὔτως 3.130. ἤπαφες, οὐδὲ δίκῃ περιέπλεο νῆιν ἐόντα; 3.131. εἰ δʼ ἄγε μοι πρόφρων τέλεσον χρέος, ὅττι κεν εἴπω· 3.132. καί κέν τοι ὀπάσαιμι Διὸς περικαλλὲς ἄθυρμα 3.133. κεῖνο, τό οἱ ποίησε φίλη τροφὸς Ἀδρήστεια 3.134. ἄντρῳ ἐν Ἰδαίῳ ἔτι νήπια κουρίζοντι 3.135. σφαῖραν ἐυτρόχαλον, τῆς οὐ σύγε μείλιον ἄλλο 3.136. χειρῶν Ἡφαίστοιο κατακτεατίσσῃ ἄρειον. 3.137. χρύσεα μέν οἱ κύκλα τετεύχαται· ἀμφὶ δʼ ἑκάστῳ 3.138. διπλόαι ἁψῖδες περιηγέες εἱλίσσονται· 3.139. κρυπταὶ δὲ ῥαφαί εἰσιν· ἕλιξ δʼ ἐπιδέδρομε πάσαις 3.140. κυανέη. ἀτὰρ εἴ μιν ἑαῖς ἐνὶ χερσὶ βάλοιο 3.141. ἀστὴρ ὥς, φλεγέθοντα διʼ ἠέρος ὁλκὸν ἵησιν. 3.142. τήν τοι ἐγὼν ὀπάσω· σὺ δὲ παρθένον Αἰήταο 3.143. θέλξον ὀιστεύσας ἐπʼ Ἰήσονι· μηδέ τις ἔστω 3.144. ἀμβολίη. δὴ γάρ κεν ἀφαυροτέρη χάρις εἴη.’ 3.145. ὧς φάτο· τῷ δʼ ἀσπαστὸν ἔπος γένετʼ εἰσαΐοντι. 3.146. μείλια δʼ ἔκβαλε πάντα, καὶ ἀμφοτέρῃσι χιτῶνος 3.147. νωλεμὲς ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα θεᾶς ἔχεν ἀμφιμεμαρπώς. 3.148. λίσσετο δʼ αἶψα πορεῖν αὐτοσχεδόν· ἡ δʼ ἀγανοῖσιν 3.149. ἀντομένη μύθοισιν, ἐπειρύσσασα παρειάς 3.150. κύσσε ποτισχομένη, καὶ ἀμείβετο μειδιόωσα· 3.151. ‘ἴστω νῦν τόδε σεῖο φίλον κάρη ἠδʼ ἐμὸν αὐτῆς 3.152. ἦ μέν τοι δῶρόν γε παρέξομαι, οὐδʼ ἀπατήσω 3.153. εἴ κεν ἐνισκίμψῃς κούρῃ βέλος Αἰήταο.’ 3.154. φῆ· ὁ δʼ ἄρʼ ἀστραγάλους συναμήσατο, κὰδ δὲ φαεινῷ 3.155. μητρὸς ἑῆς εὖ πάντας ἀριθμήσας βάλε κόλπῳ. 3.156. αὐτίκα δʼ ἰοδόκην χρυσέῃ περικάτθετο μίτρῃ 3.157. πρέμνῳ κεκλιμένην· ἀνὰ δʼ ἀγκύλον εἵλετο τόξον. 3.158. βῆ δὲ διὲκ μεγάροιο Διὸς πάγκαρπον ἀλωήν. 3.159. αὐτὰρ ἔπειτα πύλας ἐξήλυθεν Οὐλύμποιο 3.160. αἰθερίας· ἔνθεν δὲ καταιβάτις ἐστὶ κέλευθος 3.161. οὐρανίη· δοιὼ δὲ πόλοι ἀνέχουσι κάρηνα 3.162. οὐρέων ἠλιβάτων, κορυφαὶ χθονός, ᾗχί τʼ ἀερθεὶς 3.163. ἠέλιος πρώτῃσιν ἐρεύθεται ἀκτίνεσσιν. 3.164. νειόθι δʼ ἄλλοτε γαῖα φερέσβιος ἄστεά τʼ ἀνδρῶν 3.165. φαίνετο καὶ ποταμῶν ἱεροὶ ῥόοι, ἄλλοτε δʼ αὖτε 3.166. ἄκριες, ἀμφὶ δὲ πόντος ἀνʼ αἰθέρα πολλὸν ἰόντι. 3.221. ὑψοῦ ἀειρόμεναι μέγʼ ἐθήλεον. αἱ δʼ ὑπὸ τῇσιν 3.222. ἀέναοι κρῆναι πίσυρες ῥέον, ἃς ἐλάχηνεν 3.275. τόφρα δʼ Ἔρως πολιοῖο διʼ ἠέρος ἷξεν ἄφαντος 3.276. τετρηχώς, οἷόν τε νέαις ἐπὶ φορβάσιν οἶστρος 3.277. τέλλεται, ὅν τε μύωπα βοῶν κλείουσι νομῆες. 3.278. ὦκα δʼ ὑπὸ φλιὴν προδόμῳ ἔνι τόξα τανύσσας 3.279. ἰοδόκης ἀβλῆτα πολύστονον ἐξέλετʼ ἰόν. 3.280. ἐκ δʼ ὅγε καρπαλίμοισι λαθὼν ποσὶν οὐδὸν ἄμειψεν 3.281. ὀξέα δενδίλλων· αὐτῷ ὑπὸ βαιὸς ἐλυσθεὶς 3.282. Αἰσονίδῃ γλυφίδας μέσσῃ ἐνικάτθετο νευρῇ 3.283. ἰθὺς δʼ ἀμφοτέρῃσι διασχόμενος παλάμῃσιν 3.284. ἧκʼ ἐπὶ Μηδείῃ· τὴν δʼ ἀμφασίη λάβε θυμόν. 3.285. αὐτὸς δʼ ὑψορόφοιο παλιμπετὲς ἐκ μεγάροιο 3.286. καγχαλόων ἤιξε· βέλος δʼ ἐνεδαίετο κούρῃ 3.287. νέρθεν ὑπὸ κραδίῃ, φλογὶ εἴκελον· ἀντία δʼ αἰεὶ 3.288. βάλλεν ὑπʼ Αἰσονίδην ἀμαρύγματα, καί οἱ ἄηντο 3.289. στηθέων ἐκ πυκιναὶ καμάτῳ φρένες, οὐδέ τινʼ ἄλλην 3.290. μνῆστιν ἔχεν, γλυκερῇ δὲ κατείβετο θυμὸν ἀνίῃ. 3.291. ὡς δὲ γυνὴ μαλερῷ περὶ κάρφεα χεύατο δαλῷ 3.292. χερνῆτις, τῇπερ ταλασήια ἔργα μέμηλεν 3.293. ὥς κεν ὑπωρόφιον νύκτωρ σέλας ἐντύναιτο 3.294. ἄγχι μάλʼ ἐγρομένη· τὸ δʼ ἀθέσφατον ἐξ ὀλίγοιο 3.295. δαλοῦ ἀνεγρόμενον σὺν κάρφεα πάντʼ ἀμαθύνει· 3.296. τοῖος ὑπὸ κραδίῃ εἰλυμένος αἴθετο λάθρῃ 3.297. οὖλος Ἔρως· ἁπαλὰς δὲ μετετρωπᾶτο παρειὰς 3.298. ἐς χλόον, ἄλλοτʼ ἔρευθος, ἀκηδείῃσι νόοιο. 3.299. δμῶες δʼ ὁππότε δή σφιν ἐπαρτέα θῆκαν ἐδωδήν 3.300. αὐτοί τε λιαροῖσιν ἐφαιδρύναντο λοετροῖς 3.301. ἀσπασίως δόρπῳ τε ποτῆτί τε θυμὸν ἄρεσσαν. 3.302. ἐκ δὲ τοῦ Αἰήτης σφετέρης ἐρέεινε θυγατρὸς 3.303. υἱῆας τοίοισι παρηγορέων ἐπέεσσιν·
4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.89 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.89. Just as the shield in Accius who had never seen a ship before, on descrying in the distance from his mountain‑top the strange vessel of the Argonauts, built by the gods, in his first amazement and alarm cries out: so huge a bulk Glides from the deep with the roar of a whistling wind: Waves roll before, and eddies surge and swirl; Hurtling headlong, it snort and sprays the foam. Now might one deem a bursting storm-cloud rolled, Now that a rock flew skyward, flung aloft By wind and storm, or whirling waterspout Rose from the clash of wave with warring wave; Save 'twere land-havoc wrought by ocean-flood, Or Triton's trident, heaving up the roots of cavernous vaults beneath the billowy sea, Hurled from the depth heaven-high a massy crag. At first he wonders what the unknown creature that he beholds may be. Then when he sees the warriors and hears the singing of the sailors, he goes on: the sportive dolphins swift Forge snorting through the foam — and so on and so on — Brings to my ears and hearing such a tune As old Silvanus piped.
5. Catullus, Poems, 64 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.43.1-4.43.2, 4.50.1-4.50.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.43.1.  But there came on a great storm and the chieftains had given up hope of being saved, when Orpheus, they say, who was the only one on shipboard who had ever been initiated in the mysteries of the deities of Samothrace, offered to these deities the prayers for their salvation. 4.43.2.  And immediately the wind died down and two stars fell over the heads of the Dioscori, and the whole company was amazed at the marvel which had taken place and concluded that they had been rescued from their perils by an act of Providence of the gods. For this reason, the story of this reversal of fortune for the Argonauts has been handed down to succeeding generations, and sailors when caught in storms always direct their prayers to the deities of Samothrace and attribute the appearance of the two stars to the epiphany of the Dioscori.
7. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.21-1.15.22, 2.11.1-2.11.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.721, 15.431-15.452 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.218, 1.223-1.296, 1.446-1.493, 8.113, 10.1-10.117, 11.725, 12.830-12.840 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.218. Huge crags and two confronted promontories 1.223. rises a straight-stemmed grove of dense, dark shade. 1.224. Fronting on these a grotto may be seen 1.225. o'erhung by steep cliffs; from its inmost wall 1.226. clear springs gush out; and shelving seats it has 1.227. of unhewn stone, a place the wood-nymphs love. 1.228. In such a port, a weary ship rides free 1.230. Hither Aeneas of his scattered fleet 1.231. aving but seven, into harbor sailed; 1.232. with passionate longing for the touch of land 1.233. forth leap the Trojans to the welcome shore 1.234. and fling their dripping limbs along the ground. 1.235. Then good Achates smote a flinty stone 1.236. ecured a flashing spark, heaped on light leaves 1.237. and with dry branches nursed the mounting flame. 1.238. Then Ceres' gift from the corrupting sea 1.239. they bring away; and wearied utterly 1.240. ply Ceres' cunning on the rescued corn 1.241. and parch in flames, and mill 'twixt two smooth stones. 1.242. Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched 1.243. the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there 1.244. torm-buffeted, might sail within his ken 1.245. with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners 1.246. or Capys or Caicus armor-clad 1.247. upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; 1.248. but while he looks, three stags along the shore 1.249. come straying by, and close behind them comes 1.250. the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale 1.251. in one long line. Aeneas stopped and seized 1.252. his bow and swift-winged arrows, which his friend 1.253. trusty Achates, close beside him bore. 1.254. His first shafts brought to earth the lordly heads 1.255. of the high-antlered chiefs; his next assailed 1.256. the general herd, and drove them one and all 1.257. in panic through the leafy wood, nor ceased 1.258. the victory of his bow, till on the ground 1.259. lay seven huge forms, one gift for every ship. 1.260. Then back to shore he sped, and to his friends 1.261. distributed the spoil, with that rare wine 1.262. which good Acestes while in Sicily 1.263. had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away 1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 1.267. calamity till now. O, ye have borne 1.268. far heavier sorrow: Jove will make an end 1.269. also of this. Ye sailed a course hard by 1.270. infuriate Scylla's howling cliffs and caves. 1.271. Ye knew the Cyclops' crags. Lift up your hearts! 1.272. No more complaint and fear! It well may be 1.273. ome happier hour will find this memory fair. 1.274. Through chance and change and hazard without end 1.275. our goal is Latium ; where our destinies 1.276. beckon to blest abodes, and have ordained 1.277. that Troy shall rise new-born! Have patience all! 1.279. Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care 1.280. feigned hopes upon his forehead firm he wore 1.281. and locked within his heart a hero's pain. 1.282. Now round the welcome trophies of his chase 1.283. they gather for a feast. Some flay the ribs 1.284. and bare the flesh below; some slice with knives 1.285. and on keen prongs the quivering strips impale 1.286. place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. 1.287. Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green 1.288. they rally their lost powers, and feast them well 1.289. on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done 1.291. in long discourse of their lost mates they tell 1.292. 'twixt hopes and fears divided; for who knows 1.293. whether the lost ones live, or strive with death 1.294. or heed no more whatever voice may call? 1.295. Chiefly Aeneas now bewails his friends 1.296. Orontes brave and fallen Amycus 1.446. her spotted mantle was; perchance she roused 1.448. So Venus spoke, and Venus' son replied: 1.449. “No voice or vision of thy sister fair 1.450. has crossed my path, thou maid without a name! 1.451. Thy beauty seems not of terrestrial mould 1.452. nor is thy music mortal! Tell me, goddess 1.453. art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph 1.454. the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art 1.455. thy favor we implore, and potent aid 1.456. in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies 1.457. or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! 1.458. Strange are these lands and people where we rove 1.459. compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand 1.461. Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.463. bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white 1.464. lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies 1.465. the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold 1.466. Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell 1.467. the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. 1.468. Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there 1.469. from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity 1.470. of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; 1.471. too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; 1.472. I trace the larger outline of her story: 1.473. Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad 1.474. no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed 1.475. by his ill-fated lady's fondest love 1.476. whose father gave him her first virgin bloom 1.477. in youthful marriage. But the kingly power 1.478. among the Tyrians to her brother came 1.479. Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime 1.480. in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose 1.481. a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch 1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 1.483. of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul 1.484. upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus 1.485. and at the very altar hewed him down. 1.486. Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully 1.487. deceived with false hopes, and empty words 1.488. her grief and stricken love. But as she slept 1.489. her husband's tombless ghost before her came 1.490. with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare 1.491. his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so 1.492. the blood-stained altar and the infamy 1.493. that darkened now their house. His counsel was 8.113. white gleaming through the grove, with all her brood 10.1. Meanwhile Olympus, seat of sovereign sway 10.2. threw wide its portals, and in conclave fair 10.3. the Sire of gods and King of all mankind 10.4. ummoned th' immortals to his starry court 10.5. whence, high-enthroned, the spreading earth he views— 10.6. and Teucria's camp and Latium 's fierce array. 10.7. Beneath the double-gated dome the gods 10.8. were sitting; Jove himself the silence broke: 10.9. “O people of Olympus, wherefore change 10.10. your purpose and decree, with partial minds 10.11. in mighty strife contending? I refused 10.12. uch clash of war 'twixt Italy and Troy . 10.13. Whence this forbidden feud? What fears 10.14. educed to battles and injurious arms 10.15. either this folk or that? Th' appointed hour 10.16. for war shall be hereafter—speed it not!— 10.17. When cruel Carthage to the towers of Rome 10.18. hall bring vast ruin, streaming fiercely down 10.19. the opened Alp. Then hate with hate shall vie 10.20. and havoc have no bound. Till then, give o'er 10.22. Thus briefly, Jove. But golden Venus made 10.23. less brief reply. “O Father, who dost hold 10.24. o'er Man and all things an immortal sway! 10.25. of what high throne may gods the aid implore 10.26. ave thine? Behold of yonder Rutuli 10.27. th' insulting scorn! Among them Turnus moves 10.28. in chariot proud, and boasts triumphant war 10.29. in mighty words. Nor do their walls defend 10.30. my Teucrians now. But in their very gates 10.31. and on their mounded ramparts, in close fight 10.32. they breast their foes and fill the moats with blood. 10.33. Aeneas knows not, and is far away. 10.34. Will ne'er the siege have done? A second time 10.35. above Troy 's rising walls the foe impends; 10.36. another host is gathered, and once more 10.37. from his Aetolian Arpi wrathful speeds 10.38. a Diomed. I doubt not that for me 10.39. wounds are preparing. Yea, thy daughter dear 10.40. awaits a mortal sword! If by thy will 10.41. unblest and unapproved the Trojans came 10.42. to Italy, for such rebellious crime 10.43. give them their due, nor lend them succor, thou 10.44. with thy strong hand! But if they have obeyed 10.45. unnumbered oracles from gods above 10.46. and sacred shades below, who now has power 10.47. to thwart thy bidding, or to weave anew 10.48. the web of Fate? Why speak of ships consumed 10.49. along my hallowed Erycinian shore? 10.50. Or of the Lord of Storms, whose furious blasts 10.51. were summoned from Aeolia ? Why tell 10.52. of Iris sped from heaven? Now she moves 10.53. the region of the shades (one kingdom yet 10.54. from her attempt secure) and thence lets loose 10.55. Alecto on the world above, who strides 10.56. in frenzied wrath along th' Italian hills. 10.57. No more my heart now cherishes its hope 10.58. of domination, though in happier days 10.59. uch was thy promise. Let the victory fall 10.60. to victors of thy choice! If nowhere lies 10.61. the land thy cruel Queen would deign accord 10.62. unto the Teucrian people,—O my sire 10.63. I pray thee by yon smouldering wreck of Troy 10.64. to let Ascanius from the clash of arms 10.65. escape unscathed. Let my own offspring live! 10.66. Yea, let Aeneas, tossed on seas unknown 10.67. find some chance way; let my right hand avail 10.68. to shelter him and from this fatal war 10.69. in safety bring. For Amathus is mine 10.70. mine are Cythera and the Paphian hills 10.71. and temples in Idalium . Let him drop 10.72. the sword, and there live out inglorious days. 10.73. By thy decree let Carthage overwhelm 10.74. Ausonia's power; nor let defence be found 10.75. to stay the Tyrian arms! What profits it 10.76. that he escaped the wasting plague of war 10.77. and fled Argolic fires? or that he knew 10.78. o many perils of wide wilderness 10.79. and waters rude? The Teucrians seek in vain 10.80. new-born Troy in Latium . Better far 10.81. crouched on their country's ashes to abide 10.82. and keep that spot of earth where once was Troy ! 10.83. Give back, O Father, I implore thee, give 10.84. Xanthus and Simois back! Let Teucer's sons 10.86. Then sovereign Juno, flushed with solemn scorn 10.87. made answer. “Dost thou bid me here profane 10.88. the silence of my heart, and gossip forth 10.89. of secret griefs? What will of god or man 10.90. impelled Aeneas on his path of war 10.91. or made him foeman of the Latin King? 10.92. Fate brought him to Italia ? Be it so! 10.93. Cassandra's frenzy he obeyed. What voice — 10.94. ay, was it mine?—urged him to quit his camp 10.95. risk life in storms, or trust his war, his walls 10.96. to a boy-captain, or stir up to strife 10.97. Etruria's faithful, unoffending sons? 10.98. What god, what pitiless behest of mine 10.99. impelled him to such harm? Who traces here 10.100. the hand of Juno, or of Iris sped 10.101. from heaven? Is it an ignoble stroke 10.102. that Italy around the new-born Troy 10.103. makes circling fire, and Turnus plants his heel 10.104. on his hereditary earth, the son 10.105. of old Pilumnus and the nymph divine 10.106. Venilia? For what offence would Troy 10.107. bring sword and fire on Latium, or enslave 10.108. lands of an alien name, and bear away 10.109. plunder and spoil? Why seek they marriages 10.110. and snatch from arms of love the plighted maids? 10.111. An olive-branch is in their hands; their ships 10.112. make menace of grim steel. Thy power one day 10.113. ravished Aeneas from his Argive foes 10.114. and gave them shape of cloud and fleeting air 10.115. to strike at for a man. Thou hast transformed 10.116. his ships to daughters of the sea. What wrong 10.117. if I, not less, have lent the Rutuli 12.830. pursued a scattered few; but less his speed 12.831. for less and less his worn steeds worked his will; 12.832. and now wind-wafted to his straining ear 12.833. a nameless horror came, a dull, wild roar 12.834. the city's tumult and distressful cry. 12.835. “Alack,” he cried, “what stirs in yonder walls 12.836. uch anguish? Or why rings from side to side 12.837. uch wailing through the city?” Asking so 12.838. he tightened frantic grasp upon the rein. 12.839. To him his sister, counterfeiting still 12.840. the charioteer Metiscus, while she swayed
10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.121-1.135, 2.39-2.46 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.121. And heaved its furrowy ridges, turns once more 1.122. Cross-wise his shattering share, with stroke on stroke 1.123. The earth assails, and makes the field his thrall. 1.124. Pray for wet summers and for winters fine 1.125. Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop 1.126. Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131. The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132. Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134. Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed 1.135. See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls 2.39. Shrink to restore the topmost shoot to earth 2.40. That gave it being. Nay, marvellous to tell 2.41. Lopped of its limbs, the olive, a mere stock 2.42. Still thrusts its root out from the sapless wood 2.43. And oft the branches of one kind we see 2.44. Change to another's with no loss to rue 2.45. Pear-tree transformed the ingrafted apple yield 2.46. And stony cornels on the plum-tree blush.
11. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.45-1.59, 1.80-1.84, 2.14-2.15, 3.394, 6.419, 7.211, 9.890-9.891, 10.111-10.121 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 50.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, Medea, 365-379, 364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Silius Italicus, Punica, 3.567-3.569, 3.571-3.574, 3.580-3.629 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.37, 1.121-1.129, 1.188-1.204, 1.246, 1.276-1.282, 1.498-1.508, 1.510-1.656, 1.693, 1.733-1.734, 2.34, 2.37, 2.57, 2.82-2.100, 2.108-2.109, 2.285-2.287, 2.381, 2.445-2.446, 2.559-2.562, 2.567-2.573, 2.585-2.612, 2.661, 3.183-3.185, 4.42-4.43, 4.114-4.132, 4.300, 4.479-4.481, 5.217-5.224, 5.415-5.454, 5.526, 5.624-5.648, 5.678-5.679, 6.429-6.435, 6.439-6.448, 6.450-6.476, 7.153-7.158, 7.177, 7.260-7.262, 7.628, 8.270-8.272, 8.350, 8.435, 8.444-8.449 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acastus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 144
achilles Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 255
actium Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
aeetes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117, 143; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 199, 242, 244, 254, 256, 261, 342; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 242, 254, 255, 342
aeson Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143, 144; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), and valerius flaccus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280
amycus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244
aphrodite Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280
aphrodite (see also venus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 199
apollo (see also phoebus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
apollodorus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 254
apollonius rhodius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 96
argo, as first ship Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
argo, construction of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 199
argonautic, expedition Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
argonauts Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 96, 97, 98
argus, builder of the argo Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143
athena (see also minerva, pallas)\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 199, 255
augustus (see also octavian) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 256
bacchus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
bagrada Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
britain Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160
caesar, julius\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
carthage Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143
castor Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 261
chalciope Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244
circe Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
civil war Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160, 244; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
cleopatra Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
colchis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117, 143, 144; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244, 256; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
cronus (see also saturn) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 254
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244
danaus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
dido Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
diodorus siculus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 254
dioscuri Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143, 144
domitian Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
egypt Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
ekphrasis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
elysium Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
evander Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 242
fate' Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280
fear, and hope ( spes ) Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 96, 97, 98
foreshadowing Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 199
fratricide/fraternal conflict Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
golden fleece Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143, 144; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 199
hera (see also juno) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 199
hercules Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160, 261
homer Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 242, 254, 255, 261
horace Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160
hylas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
hyperion Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 254
hypsipyle Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
iapetus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 254
ino Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
jason Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117, 143, 144; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
juno, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 98
juno Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 160, 199, 255, 256
jupiter, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 96, 97
jupiter, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 96, 97, 98
jupiter Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143; Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 160, 199, 244, 254, 255, 256, 261, 342
laomedon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160
lemnos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
lucan, fear and hope Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 160, 244
mars Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 256
medea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 160, 199; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
mezentius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 242
neptune (see also poseidon) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 242, 244
nero Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 160
odysseus (see also ulysses) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 242, 255
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 116, 256
pacuvius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 255
pelias Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143, 144; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244, 261; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
pelion, mt. Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143
perses Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
perses (brother of aeetes) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
phaethon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 256
phineus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 98; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 261
phrixus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244, 256
pliny the elder Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160
pollux Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 244, 261
polyphemus (giant; see also cyclops) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 242
pompey Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
primitivism Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
promachus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 144
prometheus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 261
proteus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
pyrene Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
rome Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 256, 342
saguntum Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
saturn (see also cronus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 254, 255
seneca the younger Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91
sigeum Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
silius italicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
sol Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 160, 242, 244, 254, 255, 256, 261, 342; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 92
statius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 91, 244, 255
stoicism, fate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 98
suicide Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
thessaly Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143, 144
thetis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 255
thoas, father of hypsipyle Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
thrace Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
titus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 342
troy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160
valerius flaccus, and apollonius rhodius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
valerius flaccus, and dionysius scytobrachion Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 143, 144
valerius flaccus, civil war in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
varro, marcus\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 255
venus, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
venus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 117
venus (see also aphrodite) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 160, 199, 254, 255, 256, 342
vespasian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 160, 342
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 116, 160, 199, 242, 254, 255, 256, 261, 342
zeus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 280