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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10969
Tosefta, Shabbat, 1.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Mishnah, Avodah Zarah, 2.3-2.7 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.3. The following things belonging to non-Jews are forbidden [for Jews to use] and the prohibition extends to any benefit that may be derived from them: wine, or a non-Jew’s vinegar that was formerly wine, Hadrianic earthenware, skins pierced at the animal’s heart. Rabban Shimon Gamaliel says: when its tear is round, [the skin] is forbidden, but if oblong it is permitted. Meat which is being brought into a place of idol worship is permitted, but that which is brought out is forbidden, because it is like a sacrifice to the dead, this is the opinion of Rabbi Akiba. With non-Jews going on a pilgrimage [to worship idols] it is forbidden to have any business transactions, but with those returning it is permitted. 2.4. Skin-bottles or flasks of non-Jews in which wine of a Jew is kept are forbidden and the prohibition extends to any benefit that may be derived from them, this is the opinion of Rabbi Meir. But the Sages say that the prohibition does not extend to deriving benefit. Grape seeds and grape-skins of non-Jews are forbidden, the prohibition extending to any benefit that may be derived from them, this is the opinion of Rabbi Meir. But the Sages say, when fresh they are forbidden but when dry they are permitted. Fish brine and Bithynian cheese of the non-Jews are forbidden, the prohibition extending to any benefit that may be derived from them, this is the opinion of Rabbi Meir. But the Sages say that the prohibition does not extend to deriving benefit." 2.5. Rabbi Judah said: Rabbi Ishmael put this question to Rabbi Joshua as they were walking on the way, “Why have they forbidden the cheese of non-Jews?” He replied, because they curdle it with the rennet of a nevelah (an animal that was not properly slaughtered.” He (Rabbi Ishmael) said: “but is not the rennet of a burnt-offering more strictly forbidden than the rennet of a nevelah? [and yet] it was said that a priest who is not fastidious may suck it out raw.” (Though the Sages disagreed with this opinion, and they said that no benefit may be derived from it, although one who consumed it did not trespass [temple property). Rabbi Joshua responded: “The reason then is because they curdle it with the rennet from calves sacrificed to idols.” He (Rabbi Ishmael) said to him: “if that be so, why do they not extend the prohibition to any benefit derived from it?” He (Rabbi Joshua) diverted him to another matter, saying: “Ishmael, how do you read for your [masc.] love is more delightful than wine” or “your [fem.] love etc. (Song of Songs 1:2” He replied: “your [fem.] love is better …” He said to him: this is not so, as it is proved by its fellow [-verse]: your ointments [masc.] have a goodly fragrance … [therefore do the maidens love you] (Song of Songs 1:3).”" 2.6. The following articles of non-Jews are prohibited but the prohibition does not extend to deriving benefit from them: 1. milk which a non-Jew milked without an israelite watching him, 2. their bread and oil (Rabbi and his court permitted the oil) 3. stewed and pickled things into which they are accustomed to put wine or vinegar, 4. pickled herring which had been minced, 5. brine in which there is no kalbith-fish floating, 6. helek, 7. pieces of asa foetida 8. and sal-conditum. Behold these are prohibited but the prohibition does not extend to deriving benefit from them." 2.7. The following are permitted to be eaten [by an israelite]:milk which a non-Jew milked with a Jew watching him; honey, grape-clusters even though these secrete moisture the law which renders food susceptible to defilement by a liquid does not apply to them preserves into which they are not accustomed to put wine or vinegar, pickled herring which has not been minced, brine containing fish, a leaf of asafoetida, and rolled olive-cakes. Rabbi Yose says: those olives having pits ready to drop out are prohibited. Locusts which come out of [a shopkeeper’s] basket are prohibited, but if from storage they are permitted. The same rule applies to terumah."
2. Mishnah, Shabbat, 1.4-1.7, 1.9 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.4. And these are of halakhot which they stated in the upper chamber of Haiah ben Hezekiah ben Gurion, when they went up to visit him. They took a count, and Bet Shammai outnumbered Beth Hillel and on that day they enacted eighteen measures." 1.5. Beth Shammai says: ink, dyes and vetch may not be soaked [on Friday afternoon] unless they can be fully soaked while it is yet day; And Bet Hillel permits it." 1.6. Beth Shammai says: bundles of wet flax may not be placed in an oven unless they can begin to steam while it is still day, nor wool in the dyer’s kettle unless it can [absorb the color] such that [the color] is visible. But Bet Hillel permits it. Bet Shammai says: traps for wild beasts, fowl, and fish may not be spread unless they can be caught while it is still day; But Bet Hillel permits it." 1.7. Bet Shammai says: one must not sell [something] to a non-Jew, or help him to load [a donkey], or lift up [an article] upon him unless he can reach a near place [before Shabbat]. But Bet Hillel permits it." 1.9. Rabban Shimon ben Gamaliel said: My father’s house was accustomed to giving white clothing to a non-Jewish launderer three days before Shabbat. And these and these agree that they lay down an olive press beams and wine press rollers."
3. Mishnah, Toharot, 6.5 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4. Mishnah, Zavim, 5.12 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.12. The following disqualify terumah:One who eats foods with first degree uncleanness; Or one who eats food with second degree uncleanness; And who drinks unclean liquids. And the one who has immersed his head and the greater part of him in drawn water; And a clean person upon whose head and greater part of him there fell three logs of drawn water; And a scroll [of Holy Scriptures], And [unwashed] hands; And one that has had immersion that same day; And foods and vessels which have become defiled by liquids."
5. Tosefta, Shabbat, 1.3-1.4, 1.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
babylonian, halakha/tradition Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
berekhiah Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
body Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
cult, public-private Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
decrees, eighteen Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
economic status Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
ethics Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
family, household and cult Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
governing voice, bavli Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
hama bar guria Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
helbo Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
huna Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
imagery, scab Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
imagery Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
impurity, leprosy and Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
index of subjects, shammaite) Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
individual-collective religious, practice Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
individual Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
individuality Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
law, biblical law Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
law, jewish legal discouse Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
leprosy Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
metaphors, image of sapahat Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
mishna Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
priesthood Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
purity (see also food laws) Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
purity laws Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
rabbinic judaism Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
rabbinic texts, rabbinic individuality Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
rabbinic texts Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
rabbis, rabbinic movement Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
rabbis Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
redaction/writing of mishna Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
sapahat Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
selfhood, rabbinic self Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
sex Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
shimon ben yohai, r. Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
skin, lesions Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
slaves, manumitted Lavee, The Rabbinic Conversion of Judaism The Unique Perspective of the Bavli on Conversion and the Construction of Jewish Identity (2017) 91
talmud, babylonian talmud Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
yahid' Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 509
yavne Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
yavne period Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
yehuda nesia, r. Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
yishmael, r. Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14
yoshua, r. Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 14