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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10954
Tosefta, Miqvaot, 6.3-6.4
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 22.28 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

22.28. וְשׁוֹר אוֹ־שֶׂה אֹתוֹ וְאֶת־בְּנוֹ לֹא תִשְׁחֲטוּ בְּיוֹם אֶחָד׃ 22.28. And whether it be cow or ewe, ye shall not kill it and its young both in one day."
2. Anon., Jubilees, 21.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

21.16. And as regards the wood of the sacrifices, beware lest thou bring (other) wood for the altar in addition to these: cypress, dêfrân, sagâd, pine, fir, cedar, savin, palm, olive, myrrh, laurel, and citron, juniper, and balsam.
3. Anon., Testament of Levi, 9.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.4. And he rose up early in the morning, and paid tithes of all to the Lord through me.
4. Philo of Alexandria, Against Flaccus, 123, 122 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

122. And when they had spent the whole night in hymns and songs, they poured out through the gates at the earliest dawn, and hastened to the nearest point of the shore, for they had been deprived of their usual places for prayer, and standing in a clear and open space, they cried out
5. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 12.119-12.120, 14.235, 14.257-14.259, 16.160-16.161 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.119. 1. The Jews also obtained honors from the kings of Asia when they became their auxiliaries; for Seleucus Nicator made them citizens in those cities which he built in Asia, and in the lower Syria, and in the metropolis itself, Antioch; and gave them privileges equal to those of the Macedonians and Greeks, who were the inhabitants, insomuch that these privileges continue to this very day: 14.235. 17. “Lucius Antonius, the son of Marcus, vice-quaestor, and vice-praetor, to the magistrates, senate, and people of the Sardians, sendeth greeting. Those Jews that are our fellowcitizens of Rome came to me, and demonstrated that they had an assembly of their own, according to the laws of their forefathers, and this from the beginning, as also a place of their own, wherein they determined their suits and controversies with one another. Upon their petition therefore to me, that these might be lawful for them, I gave order that these their privileges be preserved, and they be permitted to do accordingly.” 14.257. Since we have ever a great regard to piety towards God, and to holiness; and since we aim to follow the people of the Romans, who are the benefactors of all men, and what they have written to us about a league of friendship and mutual assistance between the Jews and our city, and that their sacred offices and accustomed festivals and assemblies may be observed by them; 14.258. we have decreed, that as many men and women of the Jews as are willing so to do, may celebrate their Sabbaths, and perform their holy offices, according to the Jewish laws; and may make their proseuchae at the sea-side, according to the customs of their forefathers; and if any one, whether he be a magistrate or private person, hindereth them from so doing, he shall be liable to a fine, to be applied to the uses of the city.” 14.259. 24. The decree of the Sardians. “This decree was made by the senate and people, upon the representation of the praetors: Whereas those Jews who are fellowcitizens, and live with us in this city, have ever had great benefits heaped upon them by the people, and have come now into the senate 16.161. When therefore they were thus afflicted, and found no end of their barbarous treatment they met with among the Greeks, they sent ambassadors to Caesar on those accounts, who gave them the same privileges as they had before, and sent letters to the same purpose to the governors of the provinces, copies of which I subjoin here, as testimonials of the ancient favorable disposition the Roman emperors had towards us.
6. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 2.129 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.129. After this every one of them are sent away by their curators, to exercise some of those arts wherein they are skilled, in which they labor with great diligence till the fifth hour. After which they assemble themselves together again into one place; and when they have clothed themselves in white veils, they then bathe their bodies in cold water. And after this purification is over, they every one meet together in an apartment of their own, into which it is not permitted to any of another sect to enter; while they go, after a pure manner, into the dining-room, as into a certain holy temple
7. Mishnah, Hulin, 5.3-5.4 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.3. If a person slaughtered [an animal] and it was found to be terefah, or if he slaughtered [it as an offering] to idols, or if he slaughtered the red cow, or an ox which was condemned to be stoned, or a heifer whose neck was to be broken: Rabbi Shimon exempts [him from having transgressed the law of “it and its young”]; But the sages make him liable. If a person slaughtered [an animal] and it became nevelah under his hand, or if he stabbed it, or tore away [the organs of the throat], he does not thereby transgress the law of it and its young. If two people bought a cow and its young, he who bought first can slaughter first; but if the second preceded him, he holds his advantage. If a person slaughtered a cow and then two of its calves, he is liable for eighty lashes. If he slaughtered its two calves and then the cow, he is liable for forty lashes. If he slaughtered it and then its calf and then the calf's offspring, he is liable for eighty lashes. If he slaughtered it and then its calf's offspring and then the calf, he is liable for forty lashes. Symmachos says in the name of r. Meir: he is liable for eighty lashes. At four periods in the year he who sells a beast to another must inform him, “I sold today its mother to be slaughtered,” or “I sold today its young to be slaughtered,” and these are they: on the eve of the last day of the feast [of Sukkot], on the eve of the first day of Pesah, on the eve of Shavuot, and on the eve of Rosh Hashanah. According to Rabbi Yose the Galilean, also on the eve of Yom Kippur, in the Galilee. Rabbi Judah says, this is so, only when there was no time in between the sales, but if there was time, he need not inform him. Rabbi Judah agrees that if he sold the mother to the bridegroom and the young to the bride, he must inform them of it, for it is certain that they will each slaughter on the same day." 5.4. At these four periods a butcher can be compelled to slaughter against his will. Even if the ox was worth a thousand dinars and the purchaser has only [paid] a dinar, they can force the butcher to slaughter it. Therefore if the animal died, the loss is upon the purchaser. At other times of the year it is not so, therefore if the animal died, the loss is upon the seller."
8. Mishnah, Miqvaot, 5.4, 6.10, 8.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.4. All seas are equivalent to a mikveh, for it is said, \"And the gathering (ulemikveh) of the waters He called the seas\" (Genesis 1:10), the words of Rabbi Meir. Rabbi Judah says: only the Great Sea is equivalent to a mikveh, for it says \"seas\" only because there are in it many kinds of seas. Rabbi Yose says: all seas afford cleanness when running, and yet they are unfit for zavim and metzoraim and for the preparation of the hatat waters." 6.10. The outlet of a bath-basin: if it is in the center, it renders [the bath] invalid [as a mikveh]; but if it is at the side, it does not render it invalid, because then it is like one mikveh adjoining another mikveh, the words of Rabbi Meir. But the sages say: if the bath- basin can contain a quarter-log of [water] before it reaches the outlet, it is valid; but if not, it is not valid. Rabbi Elazar bar Zadok says: if the outlet can contain any amount of [water], it is invalid." 8.1. The land of Israel is clean and its mikvaot are clean. The mikvaot of the nations outside the land are valid for those who had a seminal emission even though they have been filled by a pump-beam; Those in the land of Israel: when outside the entrance [to the city] are valid even for menstruants, and those within the entrance [to the city] are valid for those who had a seminal emission but invalid for all [others] who are unclean. Rabbi Eliezer says: those which are near to a city or to a road are unclean because of laundering; but those at a distance are clean."
9. Mishnah, Negaim, 7.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.1. The following bright spots are clean:Those that one had before the Torah was given, Those that a non-Jew had when he converted; Or a child when it was born, Or those that were in a crease and were subsequently uncovered. If they were on the head or the beard, on a boil, a burn or a blister that is festering, and subsequently the head or the beard became bald, and the boil, burn or blister turned into a scar, they are clean. If they were on the head or the beard before they grew hair, and they then grew hair and subsequently became bald, or if they were on the body before the boil, burn or blister before they were festering and then these formed a scar or were healed: Rabbi Eliezer ben Jacob said that they are unclean since at the beginning and at the end they were unclean, But the sages say: they are clean."
10. Mishnah, Niddah, 7.3 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.3. All bloodstains that come from Rekem are clean. Rabbi Judah declares them unclean, because the people who live there are proselytes though misguided. Those that come from non-Jews are clean. Those that come from Israelites or from Samaritans: Rabbi Meir declares them unclean, But the sages declare them clean because they are not suspected in regard to their stains."
11. Mishnah, Yoma, 3.3 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.3. A man may not enter the Temple courtyard or to worship even if he was clean until he immerses himself. Five immersions and ten sanctifications did the high priest perform on that day. And all in sanctity in the Bet Haparvah with the exception of this one alone."
12. New Testament, Acts, 16.13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.13. On the Sabbath day we went forth outside of the city by a riverside, where we supposed there was a place of prayer, and we sat down, and spoke to the women who had come together.
13. Tosefta, Miqvaot, 5.7-5.8, 6.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Tosefta, Niddah, 9.14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Tertullian, To The Heathen, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 305-306, 304

304. needs. Everything they wanted was furnished for them on a lavish scale. In addition to this Dorotheus made the same preparations for them daily as were made for the king himself - for thus he had been commanded by the king. In the early morning they appeared daily at the Court, and


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts, synagogues, synagogues, near water Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
agricultural matters Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
alon, g. Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 273
amphitheater Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
anaths house Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32, 273
animals Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32
animals food Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32
aqiba Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 159
ashkelon Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32
asia minor, communal organization, leadership Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
asia minor, jewish communities, communal organization, leadership Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
asia minor, synagogues Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
associations, jewish Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
bath-house Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32
bathhouse Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
blessings Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
blood Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 273
buying and/or selling Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32, 164
büchler, a. Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 273
canaanite slaves Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
carrying Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 273
chagall, bella rosenfeld Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 285
children of noah Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
circumcision Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
cistern, stepped Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
clothes/garments Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32, 273
damages (injury) Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
demai Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 164
demons Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 285
dog-(food) Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 32, 164
eleazar Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 159
eleazar b. simeon Porton, Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta (1988) 159
high priest Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
idolatry Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
letter of aristeas Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
maon (judaea) Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
maon (nirim) Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
merot, stepped cistern Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
miqveh Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 285
miqveh (ritual bath, stepped cistern) Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114, 334
onqelos the proselyte Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
oppenheimer, aharon Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 285
pagan, pagans, cities Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
pagan, pagans, relationship with jewish community Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
proseuche (prayer house), diaspora, delos Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
proseuche (prayer house), diaspora, egypt Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
proseuche (prayer house), diaspora, halicarnassus Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
r. joshua b. qabusai Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
r. meir Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
r.yosi Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
sabbath, edicts regarding Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
samaritans, chronicles Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
samaritans, ritual bath (miqveh) Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
sardis, edicts Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
susiya synagogue, water installations Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
synagogue architecture, atriums and water installations Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
tertullian Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334
water, location of synagogues near Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114, 334
women, seating, synagogue' Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 114
yom kippur, temple Levine, The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years (2005) 334