Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10935
Tosefta, Berachot, 6.25


ולא יעשה קפנדריא ורקיקה מק\"ו שאין [בו] דרך בזיון אמרה תורה כך על אחת כמה וכמה [וקל וחומר שיש בו דרך בזיון ר' יהודה בר' יוסי] אומר אינו צריך הרי הוא אומר כי אין לבא אל שער המלך בלבוש שק בא וראה על אחת כמה וכמה קלין וחמורין בדבר אם לפני מלך בשר ודם אין עושין כן לא כ\"ש לפני מלך מלכי המלכים הקב\"ה.Rebbi Yossi Ben Rebbi Yehudah says, “It says [in the verse], ‘… because you cannot come into the gate of the king in sackcloth.’ (Esther 4:2) For sure there are many more Kal Vechomer (a derivation from minor to major) derivations in this case.” And spitting [is forbidden on the Temple Mount] from a Kal Vechomer. Even though a shoe has nothing disgraceful about it, [and still] the Torah says not to go with a shoe [on to the Temple Mount], it is a Kal Vechomer to spitting which is disgraceful, [that it should be for sure forbidden on the Temple Mount].


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Anon., Sifre Deuteronomy, 36 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4. Palestinian Talmud, Berachot, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

5. Babylonian Talmud, Menachot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

43b. bwhat do they do with,i.e., how do they interpret, bthisverse: b“With which you cover yourself”(Deuteronomy 22:12)? The Gemara answers that the Rabbis brequireit bfor that which is taughtin a ibaraita /i: The phrase b“on the four corners of your garment”(Deuteronomy 22:12) indicates that one is required to attach ritual fringes to a garment that has bfourcorners, bbut notto one that has bthreecorners.,The ibaraitacontinues: bDo you saythat a garment with bfourcorners is obligated bbut nota garment with bthreecorners? bOr is itteaching bonlythat a garment with bfourcorners is obligated bbut nota garment that has bfivecorners? bWhenthe verse bstates: “With which you cover yourself,”a garment bwith fivecorners bis thereby mentionedin the verse as being obligated. Then bhow do I realizethe meaning of: b“On the fourcorners of your garment”? It teaches that this obligation is limited to a garment that has bfourcorners, bbut notto one that has bthreecorners.,The Gemara asks: bBut what did you seethat led you bto includea garment bwith fivecorners band to excludea garment bwith threecorners, rather than including a garment with three corners and excluding a garment with five corners? The Gemara answers: bI includea garment bwith fivecorners, bas five includes four, and I excludea garment bwith threecorners, bas three does not include four. /b,The Gemara asks: bAndhow does bRabbi Shimonderive the ihalakhathat a five-cornered garment is required to have ritual fringes? The Gemara answers: He bderivesit bfromthe seemingly extraneous word: “With bwhich [ iasher /i]you cover yourself” (Deuteronomy 22:12). The Gemara asks: bAndwhat do bthe Rabbisderive from this word? The Gemara answers: bThey do not learnany new ihalakhotfrom the word b“which [ iasher /i].” /b,The Gemara asks: bAndas for bthe Rabbis, what do they do with thisphrase: b“That you may look upon it”(Numbers 15:39), from which Rabbi Shimon derives that a nighttime garment is exempt? The Gemara answers: bThey require it for that which is taughtin a ibaraita /i: The verse: b“That you may look upon it and remember”(Numbers 15:39), teaches that one should bsee this mitzvaof ritual fringes band remember another mitzva that is contingent on it. And whichmitzva bis that? It isthe mitzva of bthe recitation of iShema /i. As we learnedin a mishna (Berakhot 9b): bFrom when may one recite iShemain the morning? From whenone can bdistinguish betweenthe bsky-bluestrings bandthe bwhitestrings of his ritual fringes., bAndit bis taughtin banother ibaraita /i: The phrase b“that you may look upon it and remember”teaches that one should bsee this mitzvaof ritual fringes band remember another mitzva that is adjacent to itin the Torah. bAnd whichmitzva bis that? It is the mitzva of diverse kindsof wool and linen, bas it is written: “You shall not wear diverse kinds, wool and linen together. You shall prepare yourself twisted cords”(Deuteronomy 22:11–12).,It bis taughtin banother ibaraita /i: The verse states: b“That you may look upon it and remember all the commandments of the Lord”(Numbers 15:39). This indicates that bonce a person is obligated in this mitzvaof ritual fringes, bhe is obligated in all of the mitzvot.The Gemara comments: bAnd this isin accordance with the opinion of bRabbi Shimon, who saysthat ritual fringes are ba positive, time-bound mitzva,and women are exempt from it. Only men are obligated in all mitzvot, including positive, time-bound mitzvot, just as they are obligated in the mitzva of ritual fringes.,It bis taughtin banother ibaraita /i: The verse states: b“That you may look upon it and remember all the commandments of the Lord”;this teaches that bthis mitzvaof ritual fringes bis equivalent to all the mitzvotof the Torah., bAndit bis taughtin banother ibaraita /i: The verse states: b“That you may look upon it and rememberall the commandments of the Lord band dothem.” This teaches that blookingat the ritual fringes bleads to rememberingthe mitzvot, and brememberingthem bleads to doingthem. bAnd Rabbi Shimon bar Yoḥai says: Anyone who is diligent in this mitzvaof ritual fringes bmerits receiving the Divine Presence.It is bwritten here: “That you may look upon it [ ioto /i]”(Numbers 15:39), band it is written there: “You shall fear the Lord your God; and Him [ ioto /i] shall you serve”(Deuteronomy 6:13). Just as iotoin that verse is referring to the Divine Presence, so too in this verse it is referring to the Divine Presence., bThe Sages taughtin a ibaraita /i: bThe Jewish people are beloved, as the Holy One, Blessed be He, surrounded them with mitzvot:They have bphylacteries on their heads, and phylacteries on their arms, and ritual fringes on their garments, and a imezuzafor their doorways. Concerning them David said: “Seven times a day I praise You, because of Your righteous ordices”(Psalms 119:164). This alludes to the two phylacteries, the four ritual fringes, and the imezuza /i, which total seven., bAnd when David entered the bathhouse and saw himself standing naked, he said: Woe to me that that I stand naked withoutany bmitzva. But once he remembered themitzva of bcircumcision that was in his flesh his mind was put at ease,as he realized he was still accompanied by this mitzva. bAfter he leftthe bathhouse, bhe recited a song aboutthe mitzva of circumcision, bas it is statedin the verse: b“For the leader, on the iSheminith /i: A Psalm of David”(Psalms 12:1). This is interpreted as a psalm babout circumcision, which was givento be performed bon the eighth [ ibashemini /i]day of the baby’s life., bRabbi Eliezer ben Ya’akov says: Anyone who has phylacteries on his head, phylacteries on his arm, ritual fringes on his garment, and a imezuzaon his doorway is strengthenedfrom ballsides bso that he will not sin, as it is statedin the verse: b“And a threefold cord is not quickly broken”(Ecclesiastes 4:12). This is interpreted as an allusion to the three mitzvot of phylacteries, ritual fringes, and imezuza /i. bAndthe verse bstates: “The angel of the Lord encamps round about them that fear Him, and delivers them”(Psalms 34:8). This is interpreted to mean that the angel of the Lord surrounds those who fulfill the mitzvot and saves them from sin., bIt is taughtin a ibaraitathat bRabbi Meir would say: What is different about itekheletfrom allother btypes of colorssuch that it was chosen for the mitzva of ritual fringes? It is bbecause itekheletis similarin its color btothe bsea, andthe bsea is similar tothe bsky, andthe bsky is similar to the Throne of Glory, as it is stated:“And they saw the God of Israel; band there was under His feet the like of a paved work of sapphire stone, and the like of the very heaven for clearness”(Exodus 24:10), indicating that the sky is like a sapphire brickwork. bAnd it is written: “The likeness of a throne, as the appearance of a sapphire stone”(Ezekiel 1:26)., bIt is taughtin a ibaraitathat bRabbi Meir would say:The bpunishment fornot attaching bwhitestrings is bgreater than the punishment fornot attaching bsky-bluestrings, despite the fact that the sky-blue strings are more important. Rabbi Meir illustrates this with ba parable: To what is this matter comparable?It is comparable bto a king of flesh and blood who said to his two subjectsthat they must bring him a seal. The king bsaid to oneof them: bBring me a seal of clay, and he said tothe other bone: Bring me a seal of gold. And both of them were negligent and did not bringthe seals. bWhich of themwill have ba greater punishment? You must saythat it is bthisone bto whom he said: Bring me a seal of clay, anddespite its availability and low cost, he bdid not bringit., bIt is taughtin a ibaraitathat bRabbi Meir would say: A person is obligated to recite one hundred blessings every day, as it is statedin the verse: b“And now, Israel, what [ ima /i] does the Lord your God require of you”(Deuteronomy 10:12). Rabbi Meir interprets the verse as though it said one hundred [ ime’a /i], rather than ima /i.,The Gemara relates that bon Shabbat and Festivals,when the prayers contain fewer blessings, bRav Ḥiyya, son of Rav Avya, made an effort to fillthis quota of blessings bwithblessings on bspices [ ibe’isparmakei /i] and sweet fruit,of which he would partake in order to recite extra blessings., bIt is taughtin a ibaraitathat bRabbi Meir would say: A man is obligated to recite three blessings every daypraising God for His kindnesses, and btheseblessings bare: Who did not make me a gentile; Who did not make me a woman;and bWho did not make me an ignoramus. /b, bRav Aḥa bar Ya’akov heard his son reciting the blessing: Who did not make me an ignoramus.Rav Aḥa bar Ya’akov bsaid to him:Is it bin factproper to go bthis farin reciting blessings? Rav Aḥa bar Ya’akov’s son bsaid to him: Rather, what blessingshould one brecite?If you will say that one should recite: bWho did not make me a slave, that isthe same as ba woman;why should one recite two blessings about the same matter? Rav Aḥa bar Ya’akov answered: Nevertheless, ba slave /b


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abbahu, r. Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
admission fees, anxieties Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
aggada in tosefta, as framing halakha Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 523, 524
aggada in tosefta, independent units Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 524
angels Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
babylonian talmud Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
body shaming Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
circumcision Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 228; Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
david, king Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
fonrobert, charlotte elisheva Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 231
fringes Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
god of israel Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
halakhah Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
hands Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
interior and structure, licentious atmosphere Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
justice Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 228
martial Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
meir, r. Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
meir, rabbi Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
mezuzah, as boundary Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 231
mezuzah, as thoroughfare Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 231
mezuzah, in philo Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 228, 231
mitsvot Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
mixed (and separate) bathing for men and women Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
nudity Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
palestine (syria palaestina) Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
persia, parthians, sasanian Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
petronius arbiter Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
philo, on mezuzah Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 228, 231
rabbinic haggadah Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153
rabbis Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
rome Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
sukkah, not a domicile Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 231
tefillin, compared to tzitzit Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 228
tosefta, aggada in Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 523, 524
trimalchio Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
tzitzit, compared to mezuzah Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 228
wine' Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 225
yom kippur Alexander, Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism (2013) 231
zeira, r. Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 153