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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10890
Tibullus, Elegies, 1.10.61
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Theocritus, Idylls, 14 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Duties, 2.45 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.45. Quorum autem prima aetas propter humilitatem et obscuritatem in hominum ignoratione versatur, ii, simul ac iuvenes esse coeperunt, magna spectare et ad ea rectis studiis debent contendere; quod eo firmiore animo facient, quia non modo non invidetur illi aetati, verum etiam favetur. Prima igitur est adulescenti commendatio ad gloriam, si qua ex bellicis rebus comparari potest, in qua multi apud maiores nostros exstiterunt; semper enim fere bella gerebantur. Tua autem aetas incidit in id bellum, cuius altera pars sceleris nimium habuit, altera felicitatis parum. Quo tamen in bello cum te Pompeius alae alteri praefecisset, magnam laudem et a summo viro et ab exercitu consequebare equitando, iaculando, omni militari labore tolerando. Atque ea quidem tua laus pariter cum re publica cecidit. Mihi autem haec oratio suscepta non de te est, sed de genere toto; quam ob rein pergarnus ad ea, quae restant. 2.45.  Those, on the other hand, whose humble and obscure origin has kept them unknown to the world in their early years ought, as soon as they approach young manhood, to set a high ideal before their eyes and to strive with unswerving zeal towards its realization. This they will do with the better heart, because that time of life is accustomed to find favour rather than to meet with opposition. Well, then, the first thing to recommend to a young man in his quest for glory is that he try to win it, if he can, in a military career. Among our forefathers many distinguished themselves as soldiers; for warfare was almost continuous then. The period of your own youth, however, has coincided with that war in which the one side was too prolific in crime, the other in failure. And yet, when Pompey placed you in command of a cavalry squadron in this war, you won the applause of that great man and of the army for your skill in riding and spear-throwing and for endurance of all the hardships of the soldier's life. But that credit accorded to you came to nothing along with the fall of the republic. The subject of this discussion, however, is not your personal history, but the general theme. Let us, therefore, proceed to the sequel.
3. Cicero, On Old Age, 56-61, 55 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Odes, 1.2.33-1.2.36, 1.2.41, 1.2.44, 1.2.49-1.2.52, 1.17.27, 1.29, 1.35.30, 1.35.33-1.35.36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.29. Moreover, what the Romans did to the remains of the wall; and how they demolished the strongholds that were in the country; and how Titus went over the whole country, and settled its affairs; together with his return into Italy, and his triumph. 1.29. 3. Now by this time Herod had sailed out of Italy, and was come to Ptolemais; and as soon as he had gotten together no small army of foreigners, and of his own countrymen, he marched through Galilee against Antigonus, wherein he was assisted by Ventidius and Silo, both whom Dellius, a person sent by Antony, persuaded to bring Herod [into his kingdom].
5. Horace, Epodes, 7.3-7.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Amores, 1.5.9-1.5.14, 1.7.47-1.7.48, 3.1.7-3.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.32, 2.297-2.302, 3.108-3.110, 3.169-3.192, 3.273, 3.639 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Fasti, 1.405-1.410, 2.319-2.324 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.405. There were Naiads too, some with uncombed flowing hair 1.406. Others with their tresses artfully bound. 1.407. One attends with tunic tucked high above the knee 1.408. Another shows her breast through her loosened robe: 1.409. One bares her shoulder: another trails her hem in the grass 1.410. Their tender feet are not encumbered with shoes. 2.319. She gave him thin vests dyed in Gaetulian purple 2.320. Gave him the elegant zone that had bound her waist. 2.321. The zone was too small for his belly, and he unfastened 2.322. The clasps of the vests to thrust out his great hands. 2.323. He fractured her bracelets, not made for such arms 2.324. And his giant feet split the little shoes.
9. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.97-1.100 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Propertius, Elegies, 1.19-1.20, 2.1.15, 2.14.23-2.14.24, 2.15.5-2.15.6, 2.15.17-2.15.18, 2.15.20, 3.4-3.5, 3.12.3, 4.7.40-4.7.41, 4.11.61 (1st cent. BCE

11. Sallust, Catiline, 2.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.1.1-1.1.5, 1.1.53-1.1.58, 1.3.47-1.3.48, 1.10.7-1.10.12, 1.10.55-1.10.60, 1.10.62-1.10.66 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.215-4.217, 9.616, 10.6-10.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age 10.6. and Teucria's camp and Latium 's fierce array. 10.7. Beneath the double-gated dome the gods 10.8. were sitting; Jove himself the silence broke: 10.9. “O people of Olympus, wherefore change 10.10. your purpose and decree, with partial minds 10.11. in mighty strife contending? I refused 10.12. uch clash of war 'twixt Italy and Troy . 10.13. Whence this forbidden feud? What fears 10.14. educed to battles and injurious arms 10.15. either this folk or that? Th' appointed hour
14. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.360-2.364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 11.77, 33.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
amor, militiae Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
ariadne Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
augustus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
breasts Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
camilla Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
cato Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
civil war Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
corinna Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 250, 260
epigram (literary genre) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
flavian period (literature, dress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
fortunata (wife of trimalchio) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
furor Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 250
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
julius caesar Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
loss Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 250
love/lovers (stereotypes) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
lucan Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
luxury Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
lycidas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 250
marcia Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 265
martial Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
massilia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
matrimonium Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
mitra (headscarf) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
naked Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
ovid Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
papillae (nipples) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
petronius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
phyllis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 250
pompey Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
propertius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260; Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
rape' Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
sallust Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
social status Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
stereotypes vii Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 265
synthesis (garment) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
theocritus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 250
tityrus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 250
trica (triclinium (trimalchio Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 265
valerius maximus Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
veil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 260
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, and roman ideology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in agricultural writers Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in roman elegy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
wool, woollen Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222