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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 8.84


nanThe army was engaged in these reflections, when the following disturbance took place about the person of Astyochus. 2 Most of the Syracusan and Thurian sailors were freemen, and these the freest crews in the armament were likewise the boldest in setting upon Astyochus and demanding their pay. The latter answered somewhat stiffly and threatened them, and when Dorieus spoke up for his own sailors even went so far as to lift his baton against him; 3 upon seeing which the mass of the men, in sailor fashion, rushed in a fury to strike Astyochus. He, however, saw them in time and fled for refuge to an altar; and they were thus parted without his being struck. 4 Meanwhile the fort built by Tissaphernes in Miletus was surprised and taken by the Milesians, and the garrison in it turned out, — an act which met with the approval of the rest of the allies, and in particular of the Syracusans, 5 but which found no favour with Lichas, who said moreover that the Milesians and the rest in the king's country ought to show a reasonable submission to Tissaphernes and to pay him court, until the war should be happily settled. The Milesians were angry with him for this and for other things of the kind, and upon his afterwards dying of sickness, would not allow him to be buried where the Lacedaemonians with the army desired.


nannan, The army was engaged in these reflections, when the following disturbance took place about the person of Astyochus. ,Most of the Syracusan and Thurian sailors were freemen, and these the freest crews in the armament were likewise the boldest in setting upon Astyochus and demanding their pay. The latter answered somewhat stiffly and threatened them, and when Dorieus spoke up for his own sailors even went so far as to lift his baton against him; ,upon seeing which the mass of the men, in sailor fashion, rushed in a fury to strike Astyochus. He, however, saw them in time and fled for refuge to an altar; and they were thus parted without his being struck. ,Meanwhile the fort built by Tissaphernes in Miletus was surprised and taken by the Milesians, and the garrison in it turned out,—an act which met with the approval of the rest of the allies, and in particular of the Syracusans, ,but which found no favour with Lichas, who said moreover that the Milesians and the rest in the king's country ought to show a reasonable submission to Tissaphernes and to pay him court, until the war should be happily settled. The Milesians were angry with him for this and for other things of the kind, and upon his afterwards dying of sickness, would not allow him to be buried where the Lacedaemonians with the army desired.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 5.71, 5.102, 6.36 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.71. How the Accursed at Athens had received their name, I will now relate. There was an Athenian named Cylon, who had been a winner at Olympia. This man put on the air of one who aimed at tyranny, and gathering a company of men of like age, he attempted to seize the citadel. When he could not win it, he took sanctuary by the goddess' statue. ,He and his men were then removed from their position by the presidents of the naval boards, the rulers of Athens at that time. Although they were subject to any penalty save death, they were slain, and their death was attributed to the Alcmaeonidae. All this took place before the time of Pisistratus. 5.102. In the fire at Sardis, a temple of Cybebe, the goddess of that country, was burnt, and the Persians afterwards made this their pretext for burning the temples of Hellas. At this time, the Persians of the provinces this side of the Halys, on hearing of these matters, gathered together and came to aid the Lydians. ,It chanced that they found the Ionians no longer at Sardis, but following on their tracks, they caught them at Ephesus. There the Ionians stood arrayed to meet them, but were utterly routed in the battle. ,The Persians put to the sword many men of renown including Eualcides the general of the Eretrians who had won crowns as victor in the games and been greatly praised by Simonides of Ceos. Those of the Ionians who escaped from the battle fled, each to his city. 6.36. The Pythia also bade him do so. Then Miltiades son of Cypselus, previously an Olympic victor in the four-horse chariot, recruited any Athenian who wanted to take part in the expedition, sailed off with the Dolonci, and took possession of their land. Those who brought him appointed him tyrant. ,His first act was to wall off the isthmus of the Chersonese from the city of Cardia across to Pactye, so that the Apsinthians would not be able to harm them by invading their land. The isthmus is thirty-six stadia across, and to the south of the isthmus the Chersonese is four hundred and twenty stadia in length.
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.20.2, 1.89, 1.100, 1.108, 1.126.3-1.126.12, 3.8, 5.1, 5.11, 5.13, 5.16, 5.18-5.19, 5.23-5.24, 5.27-5.28, 5.43-5.44, 5.46, 5.52-5.54, 5.56-5.57, 5.70, 5.82-5.83, 6.16, 6.54-6.59, 7.11-7.15, 8.10, 8.12, 8.14-8.19, 8.35-8.37, 8.44-8.49, 8.52-8.56, 8.65-8.69, 8.81-8.82, 8.86, 8.89, 8.97 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.20.2. The general Athenian public fancy that Hipparchus was tyrant when he fell by the hands of Harmodius and Aristogiton; not knowing that Hippias, the eldest of the sons of Pisistratus, was really supreme, and that Hipparchus and Thessalus were his brothers; and that Harmodius and Aristogiton suspecting, on the very day, nay at the very moment fixed on for the deed, that information had been conveyed to Hippias by their accomplices, concluded that he had been warned, and did not attack him, yet, not liking to be apprehended and risk their lives for nothing, fell upon Hipparchus near the temple of the daughters of Leos, and slew him as he was arranging the Panathenaic procession. 1.126.6. Whether the grand festival that was meant was in Attica or elsewhere was a question which he never thought of, and which the oracle did not offer to solve. For the Athenians also have a festival which is called the grand festival of Zeus Meilichios or Gracious, viz. the Diasia. It is celebrated outside the city, and the whole people sacrifice not real victims but a number of bloodless offerings peculiar to the country. However, fancying he had chosen the right time, he made the attempt. 1.126.7. As soon as the Athenians perceived it, they flocked in, one and all, from the country, and sat down, and laid siege to the citadel.
3. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.1.2, 1.5.19 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.1.2. Shortly after this, at the beginning of the winter, Dorieus, the son of Diagoras, sailed into the Hellespont from Rhodes with fourteen ships, arriving at daybreak. And when the Athenian day-watcher described him, he signalled to the generals, and they put out against him with twenty ships; and Dorieus, fleeing from them towards the shore, beached his triremes, as fast as he got them clear of the enemy, in the neighbourhood of Rhoeteum. 1.5.19. On the way Phanosthenes fell in with two Thurian triremes and captured them, crews and all; and the men who were thus taken were all imprisoned by the Athenians, but their commander, Dorieus, a Rhodian by birth, but some time before exiled from both Athens and Rhodes by the Athenians, who had condemned him and his kinsmen to death, and now a citizen of Thurii, they set free without even exacting a ransom, taking pity upon him.
4. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 10-13, 16-19, 2, 20-21, 23-28, 3, 34-41, 5-9, 1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.44.1, 6.7.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.44.1. Near Coroebus is buried Orsippus who won the footrace at Olympia by running naked when all his competitors wore girdles according to ancient custom. 720 B.C. They say also that Orsippus when general afterwards annexed some of the neighboring territory. My own opinion is that at Olympia he intentionally let the girdle slip off him, realizing that a naked man can run more easily than one girt. 6.7.1. So much for the story of Euthymus. After his statue stands a runner in the foot-race, Pytharchus of Mantinea, and a boxer, Charmides of Elis, both of whom won prizes in the contests for boys. When you have looked at these also you will reach the statues of the Rhodian athletes, Diagoras and his family. These were dedicated one after the other in the following order. Acusilaus, who received a crown for boxing in the men's class; Dorieus, the youngest, who won the pancratium at Olympia on three successive occasions. Even before Dorieus, Damagetus beat all those who had entered for the pancratium.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcibiades Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
antiochus of lepreon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
aristotle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
athenaion politeia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
athletes, and tyranny Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
ceos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
chersonesus, thracian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
cylon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
diodorus siculus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
dorieus of rhodes Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
ecclesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
ephesus, battle of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
epinikia, as gifts by athletes Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
eretria Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
eualcides of eretria Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
gifts, and power Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
herodotus, historian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
hybris Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
leon of sparta Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
lichas of sparta Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
luxury Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
marcellinus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
megara Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
miltiades the elder Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
oenophyta Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
oligarchic conspiracy/revolution (nan' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
orsippus of megara Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
persia, persians Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
rhodes, rhodians Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
sicily Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
simonides Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
skaptesyle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
thrace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
thucydides, historian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
thucydides, son of melesias, book-division Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
thurii Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 134
vergil, aeneid Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
vergil Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24