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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 8.82.2


ὁ δὲ τὸ μὲν ἐπὶ τὸν Πειραιᾶ πλεῖν τοὺς ἐγγυτέρω πολεμίους ὑπολιπόντας καὶ πάνυ διεκώλυσε, πολλῶν ἐπειγομένων, τὰ δὲ τοῦ πολέμου πρῶτον ἔφη, ἐπειδὴ καὶ στρατηγὸς ᾕρητο, πλεύσας ὡς Τισσαφέρνην πράξειν.To the plan of sailing for Piraeus, leaving their more immediate enemies behind them, Alcibiades opposed the most positive refusal, in spite of the numbers that insisted upon it, saying that now that he had been elected general he would first sail to Tissaphernes and concert with him measures for carrying on the war.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 421 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

421. ὅτε γ' ὢν ἐγὼ πρόβουλος, ἐκπορίσας ὅπως
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.65.5, 3.95.3, 3.97.2, 3.98, 3.112.7, 8.27.2-8.27.3, 8.67.1, 8.67.3, 8.86.4, 8.89, 8.93.3, 8.96.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.65.5. For as long as he was at the head of the state during the peace, he pursued a moderate and conservative policy; and in his time its greatness was at its height. When the war broke out, here also he seems to have rightly gauged the power of his country. 3.95.3. His base he established at Oeneon in Locris, as the Ozolian Locrians were allies of Athens and were to meet him with all their forces in the interior. Being neighbors of the Aetolians and armed in the same way, it was thought that they would be of great service upon the expedition, from their acquaintance with the localities and the warfare of the inhabitants. 3.97.2. Led on by his advisers and trusting in his fortune, as he had met with no opposition, without waiting for his Locrian reinforcements, who were to have supplied him with the light-armed darters in which he was most deficient, he advanced and stormed Aegitium, the inhabitants flying before him and posting themselves upon the hills above the town, which stood on high ground about nine miles from the sea. 3.112.7. In their manifold efforts to escape some even turned to the sea, which was not far off, and seeing the Athenian ships coasting along shore just while the action was going on, swam off to them, thinking it better in the panic they were in, to perish, if perish they must, by the hands of the Athenians, than by those of the barbarous and detested Amphilochians. 8.67.1. At this juncture arrived Pisander and his colleagues, who lost no time in doing the rest. First they assembled the people, and moved to elect ten commissioners with full powers to frame a constitution, and that when this was done they should on an appointed day lay before the people their opinion as to the best mode of governing the city. 8.67.3. The way thus cleared, it was now plainly declared, that all tenure of office and receipt of pay under the existing institutions were at an end, and that five men must be elected as presidents, who should in their turn elect one hundred, and each of the hundred three apiece; and that this body thus made up to four hundred should enter the council chamber with full powers and govern as they judged best, and should convene the five thousand whenever they pleased. 8.86.4. Besides these they made a number of other statements which had no better success with their angry auditors; and amid a host of different opinions the one which found most favour was that of sailing to Piraeus . Now it was that Alcibiades for the first time did the state a service, and one of the most signal kind. For when the Athenians at Samos were bent upon sailing against their countrymen, in which case Ionia and the Hellespont would most certainly at once have passed into possession of the enemy, Alcibiades it was who prevented them. 8.93.3. After a great many had spoken and had been spoken to, the whole body of heavy infantry became calmer than before, absorbed by their fears for the country at large, and now agreed to hold upon an appointed day an assembly in the theatre of Dionysus for the restoration of concord. 8.96.5. But here, as on so many other occasions the Lacedaemonians proved the most convenient people in the world for the Athenians to be at war with. The wide difference between the two characters, the slowness and want of energy of the Lacedaemonians as contrasted with the dash and enterprise of their opponents, proved of the greatest service, especially to a maritime empire like Athens . Indeed this was shown by the Syracusans, who were most like the Athenians in character, and also most successful in combating them.
3. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.3.30 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.3.30. Now to let you know that this man’s present doings are nothing new, but that he is, rather, a traitor by nature, I will recall to you his past deeds. This man in the beginning, although he had received honours at the hands of the democracy, was extremely eager, like his father Hagnon, to change the democracy into the oligarchy of the Four Hundred, See note on I. vii. 28. and he was a leader in that government. When, 404 B.C. however, he perceived that some opposition to the oligarchy was gathering, he look the lead again—as champion of the democrats against the oligarchs! That is the reason, you know, why he is nicknamed Buskin :


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 398
aristotle, on the oligarchy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640
astyochus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 397
chios Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 397
constitution of athens (aristotle) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640
democracy, in athens, vs. the oligarchy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640
eion Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 398
hermocrates Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 397
lebeau le cadet, m., on philoctetes and alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640
nemea Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 397
philoctetes (sophocles), and alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640
phrynichos (politician) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 398
probouloi Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 397
theramenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 398
thucydides, son of melesias, generalship' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 398
thucydides (politician), on the oligarchy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 640