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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 8.73.3


καὶ Ὑπέρβολόν τέ τινα τῶν Ἀθηναίων, μοχθηρὸν ἄνθρωπον, ὠστρακισμένον οὐ διὰ δυνάμεως καὶ ἀξιώματος φόβον, ἀλλὰ διὰ πονηρίαν καὶ αἰσχύνην τῆς πόλεως, ἀποκτείνουσι μετὰ Χαρμίνου τε ἑνὸς τῶν στρατηγῶν καί τινων τῶν παρὰ σφίσιν Ἀθηναίων, πίστιν διδόντες αὐτοῖς, καὶ ἄλλα μετ’ αὐτῶν τοιαῦτα ξυνέπραξαν, τοῖς τε πλέοσιν ὥρμηντο ἐπιτίθεσθαι.Meanwhile they put to death one Hyperbolus, an Athenian, a pestilent fellow that had been ostracised, not from fear of his influence on position, but because he was a rascal and a disgrace to the city; being aided in this by Charminus, one of the generals, and by some of the Athenians with them, to whom they had sworn friendship, and with whom they perpetrated other acts of the kind, and now determined to attack the people.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 530 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

530. ἐντεῦθεν ὀργῇ Περικλέης οὑλύμπιος
2. Aristophanes, Knights, 112, 1304, 16-18, 111 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

111. ἕως καθεύδει. ταῦτ'. ἀτὰρ τοῦ δαίμονος
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.7, 1.90, 1.100, 1.121.3, 1.127, 2.13, 2.13.3, 2.65, 2.65.8-2.65.9, 3.34, 3.38.2, 5.16.1, 6.12, 6.15-6.16, 6.28, 6.42, 6.51, 7.11-7.15, 7.48.3-7.48.4, 7.50.4, 7.77, 8.15.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.121.3. which they possess shall be raised by us from our respective antecedent resources, and from the monies at Olympia and Delphi . A loan from these enables us to seduce their foreign sailors by the offer of higher pay. For the power of Athens is more mercenary than national; while ours will not be exposed to the same risk, as its strength lies more in men than in money. 2.13.3. Here they had no reason to despond. Apart from other sources of income, an average revenue of six hundred talents of silver was drawn from the tribute of the allies; and there were still six thousand talents of coined silver in the Acropolis, out of nine thousand seven hundred that had once been there, from which the money had been taken for the porch of the Acropolis, the other public buildings, and for Potidaea . 2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen. 3.38.2. Such a man must plainly either have such confidence in his rhetoric as to adventure to prove that what has been once for all decided is still undetermined, or be bribed to try to delude us by elaborate sophisms. 5.16.1. Now, however, after the Athenian defeat at Amphipolis, and the death of Cleon and Brasidas, who had been the two principal opponents of peace on either side—the latter from the success and honor which war gave him, the former because he thought that, if tranquillity were restored, his crimes would be more open to detection and his slanders less credited—the foremost candidates for power in either city, Pleistoanax, son of Pausanias, king of Lacedaemon, and Nicias, son of Niceratus, the most fortunate general of his time, each desired peace more ardently than ever. Nicias, while still happy and honored, wished to secure his good fortune, to obtain a present release from trouble for himself and his countrymen, and hand down to posterity a name as an ever-successful statesman, and thought the way to do this was to keep out of danger and commit himself as little as possible to fortune, and that peace alone made this keeping out of danger possible. Pleistoanax, again, was assailed by his enemies for his restoration, and regularly held up by them to the prejudice of his countrymen, upon every reverse that befell them, as though his unjust restoration were the cause; 7.48.3. Accordingly, knowing this and really waiting because he hesitated between the two courses and wished to see his way more clearly, in his public speech on this occasion he refused to lead off the army, saying he was sure the Athenians would never approve of their returning without a vote of theirs. Those who would vote upon their conduct, instead of judging the facts as eye-witnesses like themselves and not from what they might hear from hostile critics, would simply be guided by the calumnies of the first clever speaker; 7.50.4. All was at last ready, and they were on the point of sailing away, when an eclipse of the moon, which was then at the full, took place. Most of the Athenians, deeply impressed by this occurrence, now urged the generals to wait; and Nicias, who was somewhat over-addicted to divination and practices of that kind, refused from that moment even to take the question of departure into consideration, until they had waited the thrice nine days prescribed by the soothsayers. The besiegers were thus condemned to stay in the country; 8.15.1. While the revolted places were all engaged in fortifying and preparing for the war, news of Chios speedily reached Athens . The Athenians thought the danger by which they were now menaced great and unmistakable, and that the rest of their allies would not consent to keep quiet after the secession of the greatest of their number. In the consternation of the moment they at once took off the penalty attaching to whoever proposed or put to the vote a proposal for using the thousand talents which they had jealously avoided touching throughout the whole war, and voted to employ them to man a large number of ships, and to send off at once under Strombichides, son of Diotimus, the eight vessels, forming part of the blockading fleet at Spiraeum, which had left the blockade and had returned after pursuing and failing to overtake the vessels with Chalcideus. These were to be followed shortly afterwards by twelve more under Thrasycles, also taken from the blockade.
4. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 13, 20, 6, 11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Nicias, 9.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Pericles, 28, 9, 15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Themistocles, 27, 25 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Lucian, How To Write History, 42, 41 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis of athens Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
alcibiades Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 217; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 179, 452, 536, 672
aristophanes, comic poet Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 536, 752
armenia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 752
artemisium Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
athenagoras Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 179
cimon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
cleon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
comedy, old comedy' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
crassus Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 217
diodorus siculus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
egesta Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 536
ephorus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
herodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
hyperbolus Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 217
lucian Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 752
lucius verus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 752
nepos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
nicias Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 217; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452, 536
phrynichos (politician) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
plataea, battle of plataea Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
pleistoanax Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 179
plutarch Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 752
salamis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 179
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 536
simonides of ceos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
sparta Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 217
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 752
thucydides Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 217