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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 8.68.2


καὶ αὐτός τε, ἐπειδὴ † μετέστη ἡ δημοκρατία καὶ ἐς ἀγῶνας κατέστη † τὰ τῶν τετρακοσίων ἐν ὑστέρῳ μεταπεσόντα ὑπὸ τοῦ δήμου ἐκακοῦτο †, ἄριστα φαίνεται τῶν μέχρι ἐμοῦ ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν τούτων αἰτιαθείς, ὡς ξυγκατέστησε, θανάτου δίκην ἀπολογησάμενος.Indeed, when he was afterwards himself tried for his life on the charge of having been concerned in setting up this very government, when the Four Hundred were overthrown and hardly dealt with by the commons, he made what would seem to be the best defence of any known up to my time.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Antiphon, Fragments, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Antiphon of Athens, Fragments, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Antiphon Tragicus, Fragments, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 8.68.1, 8.68.4, 8.89, 8.89.3, 8.95, 8.97, 8.97.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8.68.1. The man who moved this resolution was Pisander, who was throughout the chief ostensible agent in putting down the democracy. But he who concerted the whole affair, and prepared the way for the catastrophe, and who had given the greatest thought to the matter, was Antiphon, one of the best men of his day in Athens ; who, with a head to contrive measures and a tongue to recommend them, did not willingly come forward in the assembly or upon any public scene, being ill-looked upon by the multitude owing to his reputation for talent; and who yet was the one man best able to aid in the courts, or before the assembly, the suitors who required his opinion. 8.68.4. Theramenes, son of Hagnon, was also one of the foremost of the subverters of the democracy—a man as able in council as in debate. Conducted by so many and by such sagacious heads, the enterprise, great as it was, not unnaturally went forward; although it was no light matter to deprive the Athenian people of its freedom, almost a hundred years after the deposition of the tyrants, when it had been not only not subject to any during the whole of that period, but accustomed during more than half of it to rule over subjects of its own. 8.89.3. But this was merely their political cry; most of them being driven by private ambition into the line of conduct so surely fatal to oligarchies that arise out of democracies. For all at once pretend to be not only equals but each the chief and master of his fellows; while under a democracy a disappointed candidate accepts his defeat more easily, because he has not the humiliation of being beaten by his equals. 8.97.2. or if he did should be held accursed. Many other assemblies were held afterwards, in which law-makers were elected and all other measures taken to form a constitution. It was during the first period of this constitution that the Athenians appear to have enjoyed the best government that they ever did, at least in my time. For the fusion of the high and the low was effected with judgment, and this was what first enabled the state to raise up her head after her manifold disasters.
5. Aeschines, Letters, 1.94, 2.180, 3.173 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.246-19.250 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 102
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 243
antiphon, identity/-ies of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 167
antiphon Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 167
ariston Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 404
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 545
chaireas Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 545
cimon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 404
law, athenian. Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 102
legal profession Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 102
logography, logographer Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 102
lysander Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 404
macedonia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 404
mantinea, battle of Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 404
oligarchic conspiracy/revolution (nan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 545
oligarchy Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 167
orators, attic Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 102
oratory Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 102
phormio Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 404
phrynichos (politician) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 545
plague Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 243
samos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 545
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 243
survival of' Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 102
thucydides, son of melesias, archaeology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 243
thucydides, son of melesias, autopsy Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 243
thucydides, son of melesias, causes, causality Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 243
thucydides, son of melesias, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 243
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 545
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 545