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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 8.47


nanAlcibiades gave this advice to Tissaphernes and the king, with whom he then was, not merely because he thought it really the best, but because he was studying means to effect his restoration to his country, well knowing that if he did not destroy it he might one day hope to persuade the Athenians to recall him, and thinking that his best chance of persuading them lay in letting them see that he possessed the favour of Tissaphernes. 2 The event proved him to be right. When the Athenians at Samos found that he had influence with Tissaphernes, principally of their own motion — though partly also through Alcibiades himself sending word to their chief men to tell the best men in the army, that if there were only an oligarchy in the place of the rascally democracy that had banished him, he would be glad to return to his country and to make Tissaphernes their friend — the captains and chief men in the armament at once embraced the idea of subverting the democracy.


nannan, Alcibiades gave this advice to Tissaphernes and the king, with whom he then was, not merely because he thought it really the best, but because he was studying means to effect his restoration to his country, well knowing that if he did not destroy it he might one day hope to persuade the Athenians to recall him, and thinking that his best chance of persuading them lay in letting them see that he possessed the favour of Tissaphernes. ,The event proved him to be right. When the Athenians at Samos found that he had influence with Tissaphernes, principally of their own motion (though partly also through Alcibiades himself sending word to their chief men to tell the best men in the army, that if there were only an oligarchy in the place of the rascally democracy that had banished him, he would be glad to return to his country and to make Tissaphernes their friend), the captains and chief men in the armament at once embraced the idea of subverting the democracy.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 101-125, 61-62, 628-629, 63, 630-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-659, 66, 660-664, 67-100 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

100. ἰαρταμὰν ἐξάρξαν ἀπισσόνα σάτρα.
2. Aristophanes, Knights, 478 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

478. καὶ πάνθ' ἃ Μήδοις καὶ βασιλεῖ ξυνόμνυτε
3. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 1341, 257, 285-295, 297, 300-304, 311, 313-316, 1340 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.4, 4.50.1-4.50.2, 5.1, 5.11, 5.13, 5.16, 5.18-5.19, 5.23-5.24, 5.27-5.28, 5.43-5.44, 5.43.2-5.43.3, 5.46, 5.52-5.54, 5.56-5.57, 5.70, 5.82-5.83, 6.16, 6.54.5-6.54.6, 6.89, 7.11-7.15, 8.1.2, 8.10, 8.12, 8.14-8.19, 8.35-8.37, 8.44-8.46, 8.46.3, 8.48-8.49, 8.52-8.56, 8.53.1-8.53.2, 8.65-8.69, 8.65.2, 8.67.3, 8.70.1, 8.81-8.82, 8.81.2, 8.84, 8.86, 8.89, 8.97, 8.97.3, 8.108 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.43.2. Foremost amongst these was Alcibiades, son of Clinias, a man yet young in years for any other Hellenic city, but distinguished by the splendor of his ancestry. Alcibiades thought the Argive alliance really preferable, not that personal pique had not also a great deal to do with his opposition; he being offended with the Lacedaemonians for having negotiated the treaty through Nicias and Laches, and having overlooked him on account of his youth, and also for not having shown him the respect due to the ancient connection of his family with them as their Proxeni, which, renounced by his grandfather, he had lately himself thought to renew by his attentions to their prisoners taken in the island. 6.54.5. Indeed, generally their government was not grievous to the multitude, or in any way odious in practice; and these tyrants cultivated wisdom and virtue as much as any, and without exacting from the Athenians more than a twentieth of their income, splendidly adorned their city, and carried on their wars, and provided sacrifices for the temples. 6.54.6. For the rest, the city was left in full enjoyment of its existing laws, except that care was always taken to have the offices in the hands of some one of the family. Among those of them that held the yearly archonship at Athens was Pisistratus, son of the tyrant Hippias, and named after his grandfather, who dedicated during his term of office the altar to the twelve gods in the market-place, and that of Apollo in the Pythian precinct. 8.1.2. Already distressed at all points and in all quarters, after what had now happened, they were seized by a fear and consternation quite without example. It was grievous enough for the state and for every man in his proper person to lose so many heavy infantry, cavalry, and able-bodied troops, and to see none left to replace them; but when they saw, also, that they had not sufficient ships in their docks, or money in the treasury, or crews for the ships, they began to despair of salvation. They thought that their enemies in Sicily would immediately sail with their fleet against Piraeus, inflamed by so signal a victory; while their adversaries at home, redoubling all their preparations, would vigorously attack them by sea and land at once, aided by their own revolted confederates. 8.53.1. the Athenian envoys who had been despatched from Samos with Pisander arrived at Athens, and made a speech before the people, giving a brief summary of their views, and particularly insisting that if Alcibiades were recalled and the democratic constitution changed, they could have the king as their ally, and would be able to overcome the Peloponnesians. 8.53.2. A number of speakers opposed them on the question of the democracy, the enemies of Alcibiades cried out against the scandal of a restoration to be effected by a violation of the constitution, and the Eumolpidae and Ceryces protested in behalf of the mysteries, the cause of his banishment, and called upon the gods to avert his recall; when Pisander, in the midst of much opposition and abuse, came forward, and taking each of his opponents aside asked him the following question:—In the face of the fact that the Peloponnesians had as many ships as their own confronting them at sea, more cities in alliance with them, and the king and Tissaphernes to supply them with money, of which the Athenians had none left, had he any hope of saving the state, unless some one could induce the king to come over to their side? 8.65.2. Here they found most of the work already done by their associates. Some of the younger men had banded together, and secretly assassinated one Androcles, the chief leader of the commons, and mainly responsible for the banishment of Alcibiades; Androcles being singled out both because he was a popular leader, and because they sought by his death to recommend themselves to Alcibiades, who was, as they supposed, to be recalled, and to make Tissaphernes their friend. There were also some other obnoxious persons whom they secretly did away with in the same manner. 8.67.3. The way thus cleared, it was now plainly declared, that all tenure of office and receipt of pay under the existing institutions were at an end, and that five men must be elected as presidents, who should in their turn elect one hundred, and each of the hundred three apiece; and that this body thus made up to four hundred should enter the council chamber with full powers and govern as they judged best, and should convene the five thousand whenever they pleased. 8.70.1. Upon the Council withdrawing in this way without venturing any objection, and the rest of the citizens making no movement, the Four Hundred entered the council chamber, and for the present contented themselves with drawing lots for their Prytanes, and making their prayers and sacrifices to the gods upon entering office, but afterwards departed widely from the democratic system of government, and except that on account of Alcibiades they did not recall the exiles, ruled the city by force; 8.81.2. An assembly was then held in which Alcibiades complained of and deplored his private misfortune in having been banished, and speaking at great length upon public affairs, highly incited their hopes for the future, and extravagantly magnified his own influence with Tissaphernes. His object in this was to make the oligarchical government at Athens afraid of him, to hasten the dissolution of the clubs, to increase his credit with the army at Samos and heighten their own confidence, and lastly to prejudice the enemy as strongly as possible against Tissaphernes, and blast the hopes which they entertained. 8.97.3. They also voted for the recall of Alcibiades and of other exiles, and sent to him and to the camp at Samos, and urged them to devote themselves vigorously to the war.
5. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.4.1, 1.4.18 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.1. As for Pharnabazus and the ambassadors, while they were spending the winter at Gordium, in Phrygia, they heard what had happened at Byzantium. 1.4.18. Meanwhile Alcibiades, who had come to anchor close to the shore, did not at once disembark, through fear of his enemies; but mounting upon the deck of 407 B.C. his ship, he looked to see whether his friends were present.
6. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 16.2, 16.10 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 23.7, 32.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23.7. For while Agis the king was away on his campaigns, Alcibiades corrupted Timaea his wife, so that she was with child by him and made no denial of it. When she had given birth to a male child, it was called Leotychides in public, but in private the name which the boy’s mother whispered to her friends and attendants was Alcibiades. Such was the passion that possessed the woman. But he, in his mocking way, said he had not done this thing for a wanton insult, nor at the behest of mere pleasure, but in order that descendants of his might be kings of the Lacedaemonians. 32.2. Duris the Samian, who claims that he was a descendant of Alcibiades, gives some additional details. He says that the oarsmen of Alcibiades rowed to the music of a flute blown by Chrysogonus the Pythian victor; that they kept time to a rhythmic call from the lips of Callipides the tragic actor; that both these artists were arrayed in the long tunics, flowing robes, and other adornment of their profession; and that the commander’s ship put into harbors with a sail of purple hue, as though, after a drinking bout, he were off on a revel.
8. Plutarch, Pericles, 7.1, 16.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.1. of his power there can be no doubt, since Thucydides gives so clear an exposition of it, and the comic poets unwittingly reveal it even in their malicious gibes, calling him and his associates new Peisistratidae, and urging him to take solemn oath not to make himself a tyrant, on the plea, forsooth, that his preeminence was incommensurate with a democracy and too oppressive.
9. Andocides, Orations, 3.29

10. Andocides, Orations, 3.29



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegean Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 664
agis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 213
alcibiades, depicted in aristophanes birds Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
alcibiades Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 213, 664
artaxerxes i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
asia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 664
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
athens and athenians, attitudes of, toward asiatics Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
athens and athenians, in pentecontaetia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
callias son of hipponicus (elder) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
deception, and tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
diodorus siculus, on alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
eleusis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
eumolpides, the Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
henderson, jeffrey Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
heracles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
heraclids Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
heralds, eleusinian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
hoplites, oath taken by Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
kerykes, the Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
marcellinus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
mother of the gods, and persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
mother of the gods, and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
neoptolemus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
noble lie, in philoctetes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
noble lie Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
odysseus, in sophocles Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
peisistratus and peisistratids Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
pericles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
persia and persians, empire of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
persia and persians, sovereignty claimed by Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
persia and persians, treaties with greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
persia and persians, war with greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
philoctetes (sophocles), and alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
pisander Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 664
plutarch, on alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
sacred marriage, in comedy Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
samos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 213
sardis, under persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
skaptesyle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
sophistry, in sophocles Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
sophocles, works, philoctetes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
sophocles Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
sparta and spartans, and persia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
sparta and spartans, in peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
sparta and spartans, kingship at Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
thrace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
thucydides, and herodotus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
thucydides, on alcibiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
thucydides, on tyrants and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
thucydides, son of melesias, book-division Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
tissaphernes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
tragedy, and contemporary resonances Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
tragedy, and deception Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
tragedy, and noble lie Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189
tyranny, greek attitudes towards Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319, 324
vergil, aeneid' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
vergil Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
vickers, michael Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 324
vidal-naquet, p. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 189