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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 7.77


nan'Athenians and allies, even in our present position we must still hope on, since men have ere now been saved from worse straits than this; and you must not condemn yourselves too severely either because of your disasters or because of your present unmerited sufferings. 2 I myself who am not superior to any of you in strength — indeed you see how I am in my sickness — and who in the gifts of fortune am, I think, whether in private life or otherwise, the equal of any, am now exposed to the same danger as the meanest among you; and yet my life has been one of much devotion towards the gods, and of much justice and without offence towards men. 3 I have, therefore, still a strong hope for the future, and our misfortunes do not terrify me as much as they might. Indeed we may hope that they will be lightened: our enemies have had good fortune enough; and if any of the gods was offended at our expedition, we have been already amply punished. 4 Others before us have attacked their neighbors and have done what men will do without suffering more than they could bear; and we may now justly expect to find the gods more kind, for we have become fitter objects for their pity than their jealousy. And then look at yourselves, mark the numbers and efficiency of the heavy infantry marching in your ranks, and do not give way too much to despondency, but reflect that you are yourselves at once a city wherever you sit down, and that there is no other in Sicily that could easily resist your attack, or expel you when once established. 5 The safety and order of the march is for yourselves to look to; the one thought of each man being that the spot on which he may be forced to fight must be conquered and held as his country and stronghold. 6 Meanwhile we shall hasten on our way night and day alike, as our provisions are scanty; and if we can reach some friendly place of the Sicels, whom fear of the Syracusans still keeps true to us, you may forthwith consider yourselves safe. A message has been sent on to them with directions to meet us with supplies of food. 7 To sum up, be convinced, soldiers, that you must be brave, as there is no place near for your cowardice to take refuge in, and that if you now escape from the enemy, you may all see again what your hearts desire, while those of you who are Athenians will raise up again the great power of the state, fallen though it be. Men make the city and not walls or ships without men in them.'


nannan, ‘Athenians and allies, even in our present position we must still hope on, since men have ere now been saved from worse straits than this; and you must not condemn yourselves too severely either because of your disasters or because of your present unmerited sufferings. ,I myself who am not superior to any of you in strength—indeed you see how I am in my sickness—and who in the gifts of fortune am, I think, whether in private life or otherwise, the equal of any, am now exposed to the same danger as the meanest among you; and yet my life has been one of much devotion towards the gods, and of much justice and without offence towards men. ,I have, therefore, still a strong hope for the future, and our misfortunes do not terrify me as much as they might. Indeed we may hope that they will be lightened: our enemies have had good fortune enough; and if any of the gods was offended at our expedition, we have been already amply punished. ,Others before us have attacked their neighbors and have done what men will do without suffering more than they could bear; and we may now justly expect to find the gods more kind, for we have become fitter objects for their pity than their jealousy. And then look at yourselves, mark the numbers and efficiency of the heavy infantry marching in your ranks, and do not give way too much to despondency, but reflect that you are yourselves at once a city wherever you sit down, and that there is no other in Sicily that could easily resist your attack, or expel you when once established. , The safety and order of the march is for yourselves to look to; the one thought of each man being that the spot on which he may be forced to fight must be conquered and held as his country and stronghold. ,Meanwhile we shall hasten on our way night and day alike, as our provisions are scanty; and if we can reach some friendly place of the Sicels, whom fear of the Syracusans still keeps true to us, you may forthwith consider yourselves safe. A message has been sent on to them with directions to meet us with supplies of food. ,To sum up, be convinced, soldiers, that you must be brave, as there is no place near for your cowardice to take refuge in, and that if you now escape from the enemy, you may all see again what your hearts desire, while those of you who are Athenians will raise up again the great power of the state, fallen though it be. Men make the city and not walls or ships without men in them.’


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 530 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

530. ἐντεῦθεν ὀργῇ Περικλέης οὑλύμπιος
2. Aristophanes, Knights, 112, 16-18, 111 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

111. ἕως καθεύδει. ταῦτ'. ἀτὰρ τοῦ δαίμονος
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.65.8-2.65.9, 5.16.1, 6.27-6.29, 6.53-6.61, 7.11-7.15, 7.48.3-7.48.4, 7.50.4, 7.76, 7.77.2, 7.86.5, 8.1.1, 8.53.2, 8.73.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen. 5.16.1. Now, however, after the Athenian defeat at Amphipolis, and the death of Cleon and Brasidas, who had been the two principal opponents of peace on either side—the latter from the success and honor which war gave him, the former because he thought that, if tranquillity were restored, his crimes would be more open to detection and his slanders less credited—the foremost candidates for power in either city, Pleistoanax, son of Pausanias, king of Lacedaemon, and Nicias, son of Niceratus, the most fortunate general of his time, each desired peace more ardently than ever. Nicias, while still happy and honored, wished to secure his good fortune, to obtain a present release from trouble for himself and his countrymen, and hand down to posterity a name as an ever-successful statesman, and thought the way to do this was to keep out of danger and commit himself as little as possible to fortune, and that peace alone made this keeping out of danger possible. Pleistoanax, again, was assailed by his enemies for his restoration, and regularly held up by them to the prejudice of his countrymen, upon every reverse that befell them, as though his unjust restoration were the cause; 7.48.3. Accordingly, knowing this and really waiting because he hesitated between the two courses and wished to see his way more clearly, in his public speech on this occasion he refused to lead off the army, saying he was sure the Athenians would never approve of their returning without a vote of theirs. Those who would vote upon their conduct, instead of judging the facts as eye-witnesses like themselves and not from what they might hear from hostile critics, would simply be guided by the calumnies of the first clever speaker; 7.50.4. All was at last ready, and they were on the point of sailing away, when an eclipse of the moon, which was then at the full, took place. Most of the Athenians, deeply impressed by this occurrence, now urged the generals to wait; and Nicias, who was somewhat over-addicted to divination and practices of that kind, refused from that moment even to take the question of departure into consideration, until they had waited the thrice nine days prescribed by the soothsayers. The besiegers were thus condemned to stay in the country; 7.77.2. I myself who am not superior to any of you in strength—indeed you see how I am in my sickness—and who in the gifts of fortune am, I think, whether in private life or otherwise, the equal of any, am now exposed to the same danger as the meanest among you; and yet my life has been one of much devotion towards the gods, and of much justice and without offence towards men. 7.86.5. This or the like was the cause of the death of a man who, of all the Hellenes in my time, least deserved such a fate, seeing that the whole course of his life had been regulated with strict attention to virtue. 8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens, for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily . 8.53.2. A number of speakers opposed them on the question of the democracy, the enemies of Alcibiades cried out against the scandal of a restoration to be effected by a violation of the constitution, and the Eumolpidae and Ceryces protested in behalf of the mysteries, the cause of his banishment, and called upon the gods to avert his recall; when Pisander, in the midst of much opposition and abuse, came forward, and taking each of his opponents aside asked him the following question:—In the face of the fact that the Peloponnesians had as many ships as their own confronting them at sea, more cities in alliance with them, and the king and Tissaphernes to supply them with money, of which the Athenians had none left, had he any hope of saving the state, unless some one could induce the king to come over to their side?
4. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 14.8, 17.1-17.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.1. On Sicily the Athenians had cast longing eyes even while Pericles was living; and after his death they actually tried to lay hands upon it. The lesser expeditions which they sent thither from time to time, ostensibly for the aid and comfort of their allies on the island who were being wronged by the Syracusans, they regarded merely as stepping stones to the greater expedition of conquest. 17.2. But the man who finally fanned this desire of theirs into flame, and persuaded them not to attempt the island any more in part and little by little, but to sail thither with a great armament and subdue it utterly, was Alcibiades; he persuaded the people to have great hopes, and he himself had greater aspirations still. Such were his hopes that he regarded Sicily as a mere beginning, and not, like the rest, as an end of the expedition. 17.3. So while Nicias was trying to divert the people from the capture of Syracuse as an undertaking too difficult for them, Alcibiades was dreaming of Carthage and Libya, and, after winning these, of at once encompassing Italy and Peloponnesus. He almost regarded Sicily as the ways and means provided for his greater war. The young men were at once carried away on the wings of such hopes, and their elders kept recounting in their ears many wonderful things about the projected expedition. Many were they who sat in the palaestras and lounging-places mapping out in the sand the shape of Sicily and the position of Libya and Carthage. Cf. Plut. Nic. 12.1-2 . 17.4. Socrates the philosopher, however, and Meton the astrologer, are said to have had no hopes that any good would come to the city from this expedition; Socrates, as it is likely, because he got an inkling of the future from the divine guide who was his familiar. Meton—whether his fear of the future arose from mere calculation or from his use of some sort of divination—feigned madness, and seizing a blazing torch, was like to have set fire to his own house.
5. Plutarch, Nicias, 26.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Pericles, 7.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcibiades, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426, 452
artemisium Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
athenians, and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athenians, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athens Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
audience, the subjects interaction with his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
belissariotes, john and michael Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 345
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
characterisation, of the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
cleon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
closure (endings of biographies) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
cognition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
comedy, old comedy' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
community, the subject and his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
ele(i)ans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
eleusinian cult Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
feelings Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
fortune Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
god(dess) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
grief, analysis through lament Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 345
hermes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
herodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
history Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
lament, city, interpretation of suffering Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 345
lament, city Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 345
minds, internal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
minds, the subjects engagement with others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias, and sicilian expedition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias, compared with pericles and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias, in thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426, 452
olympian games Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
olympian truce Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
olympian zeus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
pericles, and the hostile public mind Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
phrynichos (politician) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
plataea, battle of plataea Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
psychology, psychological, ability of the subjects to be attuned to others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
psychology, psychological Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
reflection, the readers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
reflection, the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
retrospection (backward movement) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
salamis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
sicilians/sicily Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
simonides of ceos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 452
social/society, dialogue of individual with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
social/society, plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
social/society, plutarchs reconstruction of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
speech(es) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89