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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 7.49


nanNicias spoke positively because he had exact information of the financial distress at Syracuse, and also because of the strength of the Athenian party there which kept sending him messages not to raise the siege; besides which he had more confidence than before in his fleet, and felt sure at least of its success. 2 Demosthenes, however, would not hear for a moment of continuing the siege, but said that if they could not lead off the army without a decree from Athens, and if they were obliged to stay on, they ought to remove to Thapsus or Catana; where their land forces would have a wide extent of country to overrun, and could live by plundering the enemy, and would thus do them damage; while the fleet would have the open sea to fight in, that is to say, instead of a narrow space which was all in the enemy's favour, a wide sea-room where their science would be of use, and where they could retreat or advance without being confined or circumscribed either when they put out or put in. 3 In any case he was altogether opposed to their staying on where they were, and insisted on removing at once, as quickly and with as little delay as possible; and in this judgment Eurymedon agreed. 4 Nicias however still objecting, a certain diffidence and hesitation came over them, with a suspicion that Nicias might have some further information to make him so positive.


nannan, Nicias spoke positively because he had exact information of the financial distress at Syracuse, and also because of the strength of the Athenian party there which kept sending him messages not to raise the siege; besides which he had more confidence than before in his fleet, and felt sure at least of its success. ,Demosthenes, however, would not hear for a moment of continuing the siege, but said that if they could not lead off the army without a decree from Athens, and if they were obliged to stay on, they ought to remove to Thapsus or Catana ; where their land forces would have a wide extent of country to overrun, and could live by plundering the enemy, and would thus do them damage; while the fleet would have the open sea to fight in, that is to say, instead of a narrow space which was all in the enemy's favour, a wide sea-room where their science would be of use, and where they could retreat or advance without being confined or circumscribed either when they put out or put in. ,In any case he was altogether opposed to their staying on where they were, and insisted on removing at once, as quickly and with as little delay as possible; and in this judgment Eurymedon agreed. ,Nicias however still objecting, a certain diffidence and hesitation came over them, with a suspicion that Nicias might have some further information to make him so positive.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

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1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.25.2, 1.29-1.30, 1.126, 2.47, 2.54, 2.90.4, 3.51.1, 5.71, 7.48 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.25.2. So the Epidamnians went to Corinth, and delivered over the colony in obedience to the commands of the oracle. They showed that their founder came from Corinth, and revealed the answer of the god; and they begged them not to allow them to perish, but to assist them. 2.90.4. The Peloponnesians seeing him coasting along with his ships in single file, and by this inside the gulf and close in shore as they so much wished, at one signal tacked suddenly and bore down in line at their best speed on the Athenians, hoping to cut off the whole squadron. 3.51.1. During the same summer, after the reduction of Lesbos, the Athenians under Nicias, son of Niceratus, made an expedition against the island of Minos, which lies off Megara and was used as a fortified post by the Megarians, who had built a tower upon it.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
agatharchides of cnidus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
nicias Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 395
omens Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
oracles Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
pagondas Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 395
piety Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
plemmyrium Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 395
sacrifices Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 395
thucydides Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
xenophon Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210