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10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 6.60-6.61


nanWith these events in their minds, and recalling everything they knew by hearsay on the subject, the Athenian people grew difficult of humour and suspicious of the persons charged in the affair of the mysteries, and persuaded that all that had taken place was part of an oligarchical and monarchical conspiracy. 2 In the state of irritation thus produced, many persons of consideration had been already thrown into prison, and far from showing any signs of abating, public feeling grew daily more savage, and more arrests were made; until at last one of those in custody, thought to be the most guilty of all, was induced by a fellow-prisoner to make a revelation, whether true or not is a matter on which there are two opinions, no one having been able, either then or since, to say for certain who did the deed. 3 However this may be, the other found arguments to persuade him, that even if he had not done it, he ought to save himself by gaining a promise of impunity, and free the state of its present suspicions; as he would be surer of safety if he confessed after promise of impunity than if he denied and were brought to trial. 4 He accordingly made a revelation, affecting himself and others in the affair of the Hermae; and the Athenian people, glad at last, as they supposed, to get at the truth, and furious until then at not being able to discover those who had conspired against the commons, at once let go the informer and all the rest whom he had not denounced, and bringing the accused to trial executed as many as were apprehended, and condemned to death such as had fled and set a price upon their heads. 5 In this it was, after all, not clear whether the sufferers had been punished unjustly, while in any case the rest of the city received immediate and manifest relief.


nannan, With these events in their minds, and recalling everything they knew by hearsay on the subject, the Athenian people grew difficult of humour and suspicious of the persons charged in the affair of the mysteries, and persuaded that all that had taken place was part of an oligarchical and monarchical conspiracy. ,In the state of irritation thus produced, many persons of consideration had been already thrown into prison, and far from showing any signs of abating, public feeling grew daily more savage, and more arrests were made; until at last one of those in custody, thought to be the most guilty of all, was induced by a fellow-prisoner to make a revelation, whether true or not is a matter on which there are two opinions, no one having been able, either then or since, to say for certain who did the deed. ,However this may be, the other found arguments to persuade him, that even if he had not done it, he ought to save himself by gaining a promise of impunity, and free the state of its present suspicions; as he would be surer of safety if he confessed after promise of impunity than if he denied and were brought to trial. ,He accordingly made a revelation, affecting himself and others in the affair of the Hermae; and the Athenian people, glad at last, as they supposed, to get at the truth, and furious until then at not being able to discover those who had conspired against the commons, at once let go the informer and all the rest whom he had not denounced, and bringing the accused to trial executed as many as were apprehended, and condemned to death such as had fled and set a price upon their heads. ,In this it was, after all, not clear whether the sufferers had been punished unjustly, while in any case the rest of the city received immediate and manifest relief.


nanTo return to Alcibiades: public feeling was very hostile to him, being worked on by the same enemies who had attacked him before he went out; and now that the Athenians fancied that they had got at the truth of the matter of the Hermae, they believed more firmly than ever that the affair of the mysteries also, in which he was implicated, had been contrived by him in the same intention and was connected with the plot against the democracy. 2 Meanwhile it so happened that, just at the time of this agitation, a small force of Lacedaemonians had advanced as far as the Isthmus, in pursuance of some scheme with the Boeotians. It was now thought that this had come by appointment, at his instigation, and not on account of the Boeotians, and that if the citizens had not acted on the information received, and forestalled them by arresting the prisoners, the city would have been betrayed. The citizens went so far as to sleep one night armed in the Theseion within the walls. 3 The friends also of Alcibiades at Argos were just at this time suspected of a design to attack the commons; and the Argive hostages deposited in the islands were given up by the Athenians to the Argive people to be put to death upon that account: 4 in short, everywhere something was found to create suspicion against Alcibiades. It was therefore decided to bring him to trial and execute him, and the Salaminia was sent to Sicily for him and the others named in the information, with instructions to order him to come and answer the charges against him, 5 but not to arrest him, because they wished to avoid causing any agitation in the army or among the enemy in Sicily, and above all to retain the services of the Mantineans and Argives, who, it was thought, had been induced to join by his influence. 6 Alcibiades, with his own ship and his fellow-accused, accordingly sailed off with the Salaminia from Sicily, as though to return to Athens, and went with her as far as Thurii, and there they left the ship and disappeared, being afraid to go home for trial with such a prejudice existing against them. 7 The crew of the Salaminia stayed some time looking for Alcibiades and his companions, and at length, as they were nowhere to be found, set sail and departed. Alcibiades, now an outlaw, crossed in a boat not long after from Thurii to Peloponnese; and the Athenians passed sentence of death by default upon him and those in his company.


nannan, To return to Alcibiades: public feeling was very hostile to him, being worked on by the same enemies who had attacked him before he went out; and now that the Athenians fancied that they had got at the truth of the matter of the Hermae, they believed more firmly than ever that the affair of the mysteries also, in which he was implicated, had been contrived by him in the same intention and was connected with the plot against the democracy. ,Meanwhile it so happened that, just at the time of this agitation, a small force of Lacedaemonians had advanced as far as the Isthmus, in pursuance of some scheme with the Boeotians. It was now thought that this had come by appointment, at his instigation, and not on account of the Boeotians, and that if the citizens had not acted on the information received, and forestalled them by arresting the prisoners, the city would have been betrayed. The citizens went so far as to sleep one night armed in the temple of Theseus within the walls. , The friends also of Alcibiades at Argos were just at this time suspected of a design to attack the commons; and the Argive hostages deposited in the islands were given up by the Athenians to the Argive people to be put to death upon that account: ,in short, everywhere something was found to create suspicion against Alcibiades. It was therefore decided to bring him to trial and execute him, and the Salaminia was sent to Sicily for him and the others named in the information, with instructions to order him to come and answer the charges against him, ,but not to arrest him, because they wished to avoid causing any agitation in the army or among the enemy in Sicily, and above all to retain the services of the Mantineans and Argives, who, it was thought, had been induced to join by his influence. ,Alcibiades, with his own ship and his fellow-accused, accordingly sailed off with the Salaminia from Sicily, as though to return to Athens, and went with her as far as Thurii, and there they left the ship and disappeared, being afraid to go home for trial with such a prejudice existing against them. ,The crew of the Salaminia stayed some time looking for Alcibiades and his companions, and at length, as they were nowhere to be found, set sail and departed. Alcibiades, now an outlaw, crossed in a boat not long after from Thurii to Peloponnese ; and the Athenians passed sentence of death by default upon him and those in his company.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Antiphon, Orations, 5.48 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Birds, 1687, 1706-1765, 1634 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1634. τὴν δὲ Βασίλειαν τὴν κόρην γυναῖκ' ἐμοὶ
3. Euripides, Helen, 1307 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1307. ἀρρήτου κούρας.
4. Herodotus, Histories, 5.55, 6.123 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.55. When he was forced to leave Sparta, Aristagoras went to Athens, which had been freed from its ruling tyrants in the manner that I will show. First Hipparchus, son of Pisistratus and brother of the tyrant Hippias, had been slain by Aristogiton and Harmodius, men of Gephyraean descent. This was in fact an evil of which he had received a premonition in a dream. After this the Athenians were subject for four years to a tyranny not less but even more absolute than before. 6.123. The Alcmeonidae were tyrant-haters as much as Callias, or not less so. Therefore I find it a strange and unbelievable accusation that they of all men should have held up a shield; at all times they shunned tyrants, and it was by their contrivance that the sons of Pisistratus were deposed from their tyranny. ,Thus in my judgment it was they who freed Athens much more than did Harmodius and Aristogeiton. These only enraged the remaining sons of Pisistratus by killing Hipparchus, and did nothing to end the tyranny of the rest of them; but the Alcmeonidae plainly liberated their country, if they truly were the ones who persuaded the Pythian priestess to signify to the Lacedaemonians that they should free Athens, as I have previously shown.
5. Lysias, Orations, 5.3-5.5, 6.4, 7.16 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19b. Meletus trusted when he brought this suit against me. What did those who aroused the prejudice say to arouse it? I must, as it were, read their sworn statement as if they were plaintiffs: Socrates is a criminal and a busybody, investigating the things beneath the earth and in the heavens and making the weaker argument stronger and
7. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

182c. and all training in philosophy and sports, to be disgraceful, because of their despotic government; since, I presume, it is not to the interest of their princes to have lofty notions engendered in their subjects, or any strong friendships and communions; all of which Love is pre-eminently apt to create. It is a lesson that our despots learnt by experience; for Aristogeiton’s love and Harmodius’s friendship grew to be so steadfast that it wrecked their power. Thus where it was held a disgrace to gratify one’s lover, the tradition is due to the evil ways of those who made such a law—
8. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.20, 1.144.1, 2.65.5, 2.65.7-2.65.9, 2.65.11, 4.59-4.65, 6.10-6.11, 6.12.2, 6.13-6.18, 6.19.2, 6.27-6.29, 6.28.1, 6.52-6.59, 6.61, 6.90.2-6.90.3, 6.92, 7.50.4, 7.77, 8.1.1, 8.53.2, 8.81.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.144.1. I have many other reasons to hope for a favorable issue, if you can consent not to combine schemes of fresh conquest with the conduct of the war, and will abstain from willfully involving yourselves in other dangers; indeed, I am more afraid of our own blunders than of the enemy's devices. 2.65.5. For as long as he was at the head of the state during the peace, he pursued a moderate and conservative policy; and in his time its greatness was at its height. When the war broke out, here also he seems to have rightly gauged the power of his country. 2.65.7. He told them to wait quietly, to pay attention to their marine, to attempt no new conquests, and to expose the city to no hazards during the war, and doing this, promised them a favorable result. What they did was the very contrary, allowing private ambitions and private interests, in matters apparently quite foreign to the war, to lead them into projects unjust both to themselves and to their allies—projects whose success would only conduce to the honor and advantage of private persons, and whose failure entailed certain disaster on the country in the war. 2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen. 2.65.11. This, as might have been expected in a great and sovereign state, produced a host of blunders, and amongst them the Sicilian expedition; though this failed not so much through a miscalculation of the power of those against whom it was sent, as through a fault in the senders in not taking the best measures afterwards to assist those who had gone out, but choosing rather to occupy themselves with private cabals for the leadership of the commons, by which they not only paralyzed operations in the field, but also first introduced civil discord at home. 6.12.2. And if there be any man here, overjoyed at being chosen to command, who urges you to make the expedition, merely for ends of his own—especially if he be still too young to command—who seeks to be admired for his stud of horses, but on account of its heavy expenses hopes for some profit from his appointment, do not allow such an one to maintain his private splendour at his country's risk, but remember that such persons injure the public fortune while they squander their own, and that this is a matter of importance, and not for a young man to decide or hastily to take in hand. 6.19.2. Nicias, perceiving that it would be now useless to try to deter them by the old line of argument, but thinking that he might perhaps alter their resolution by the extravagance of his estimates, came forward a second time and spoke as follows:— 6.28.1. Information was given accordingly by some resident aliens and body servants, not about the Hermae but about some previous mutilations of other images perpetrated by young men in a drunken frolic, and of mock celebrations of the mysteries, averred to take place in private houses. 6.90.2. We sailed to Sicily first to conquer, if possible, the Siceliots, and after them the Italiots also, and finally to assail the empire and city of Carthage . 6.90.3. In the event of all or most of these schemes succeeding, we were then to attack Peloponnese, bringing with us the entire force of the Hellenes lately acquired in those parts, and taking a number of barbarians into our pay, such as the Iberians and others in those countries, confessedly the most warlike known, and building numerous galleys in addition to those which we had already, timber being plentiful in Italy ; and with this fleet blockading Peloponnese from the sea and assailing it with our armies by land, taking some of the cities by storm, drawing works of circumvallation round others, we hoped without difficulty to effect its reduction, and after this to rule the whole of the Hellenic name. 7.50.4. All was at last ready, and they were on the point of sailing away, when an eclipse of the moon, which was then at the full, took place. Most of the Athenians, deeply impressed by this occurrence, now urged the generals to wait; and Nicias, who was somewhat over-addicted to divination and practices of that kind, refused from that moment even to take the question of departure into consideration, until they had waited the thrice nine days prescribed by the soothsayers. The besiegers were thus condemned to stay in the country; 8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens, for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily . 8.53.2. A number of speakers opposed them on the question of the democracy, the enemies of Alcibiades cried out against the scandal of a restoration to be effected by a violation of the constitution, and the Eumolpidae and Ceryces protested in behalf of the mysteries, the cause of his banishment, and called upon the gods to avert his recall; when Pisander, in the midst of much opposition and abuse, came forward, and taking each of his opponents aside asked him the following question:—In the face of the fact that the Peloponnesians had as many ships as their own confronting them at sea, more cities in alliance with them, and the king and Tissaphernes to supply them with money, of which the Athenians had none left, had he any hope of saving the state, unless some one could induce the king to come over to their side? 8.81.2. An assembly was then held in which Alcibiades complained of and deplored his private misfortune in having been banished, and speaking at great length upon public affairs, highly incited their hopes for the future, and extravagantly magnified his own influence with Tissaphernes. His object in this was to make the oligarchical government at Athens afraid of him, to hasten the dissolution of the clubs, to increase his credit with the army at Samos and heighten their own confidence, and lastly to prejudice the enemy as strongly as possible against Tissaphernes, and blast the hopes which they entertained.
9. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.4.12-1.4.16, 1.4.20, 1.7.22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.12. And when he found that the temper of the Athenians was kindly, that they had chosen him general, and that his friends were urging him by personal messages to return, he sailed in to Piraeus, arriving on the day when the city was celebrating the Plynteria When the clothing of the ancient wooden statue of Athena Polias was removed and washed ( πλύνειν ). and the statue of Athena was veiled from sight,—a circumstance which some people imagined was of ill omen, both for him and for the state; for on that day no Athenian would venture to engage in any serious business. 1.4.13. When he sailed in, the common crowd of Piraeus and of the city gathered to his ships, filled with wonder and desiring to see the famous Alcibiades. Some of them said that he was the best of the citizens; that he alone was banished without just cause, but rather because he was plotted against by those who had less power than he and spoke less well and ordered their political doings with a view to their own private gain, whereas he was always 407 B.C. advancing the common weal, both by his own means and by the power of the state. 1.4.14. At the time in question, In 415 B.C. , just before the departure of Alcibiades with the Syracusan expedition. they said, he was willing to be brought to trial at once, when the charge had just been made that he had committed sacrilege against the Eleusinian Mysteries; his enemies, however, postponed the trial, which was obviously his right, and then, when he was absent, robbed him of his fatherland; 1.4.15. thereafter, in his exile, helpless as a slave and in danger of his life every day, he was forced to pay court to those whom he hated most The Spartans and the Persians. ; and though he saw those who were dearest to him, his fellow-citizens and kinsmen and all Athens, making mistakes, he was debarred by his banishment from the opportunity of helping them. 1.4.16. It was not the way, they said, of men such as he to desire revolution or a change in government; for under the democracy it had been his fortune to be not only superior to his contemporaries but also not inferior to his elders, while his enemies, on the other hand, were held in precisely the same low estimation after his banishment as before; later, however, when they had gained power, they had slain the best men, and since they alone were left, they were accepted by the citizens merely for the reason that better men were not available. 1.4.20. And after he had spoken in his own defence before the Senate and the Assembly, saying that he had not committed sacrilege and that he had been unjustly treated, and after more of the same sort had been said, with no one speaking in opposition because the Assembly would not have tolerated it, he was proclaimed general-in-chief with absolute authority, the people thinking that he was the man to recover for the state its former power; then, as his first act, he led out all his troops and conducted by land the procession From Athens to the temple of Demeter at Eleusis. of the Eleusinian Mysteries, which the Athenians had been conducting by sea on account of the war; 1.7.22. Or if you do not wish to do this, try them under the following law, which applies to temple-robbers and traitors: namely, if anyone shall be a traitor to the state or shall steal sacred property, he shall be tried before a court, and if he be convicted, he shall not be buried in Attica, and his property shall be confiscated.
10. Aeschines, Letters, 3.187 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 57.1-57.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Demosthenes, Orations, 22.2, 22.27, 25.79, 59.116 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.5.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.5.1.  That the Rape of Corê took place in the manner we have described is attested by many ancient historians and poets. Carcinus the tragic poet, for instance, who often visited in Syracuse and witnessed the zeal which the inhabitants displayed in the sacrifices and festive gatherings for both Demeter and Corê, has the following verses in his writings: Demeter's daughter, her whom none may name, By secret schemings Pluton, men say, stole, And then he dropped into earth's depths, whose light Is darkness. Longing for the vanished girl Her mother searched and visited all lands In turn. And Sicily's land by Aetna's crags Was filled with streams of fire which no man could Approach, and groaned throughout its length; in grief Over the maiden now the folk, beloved of Zeus, was perishing without the corn. Hence honour they these goddesses e'en now.
14. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 33.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33.2. At this time, In the early summer of 408 B.C. therefore, the people had only to meet in assembly, and Alcibiades addressed them. He lamented and bewailed his own lot, but had only little and moderate blame to lay upon the people. The entire mischief he ascribed to a certain evil fortune and envious genius of his own. Then he descanted at great length upon the vain hopes which their enemies were cherishing, and wrought his hearers up to courage. At last they crowned him with crowns of gold, and elected him general with sole powers by land and sea.
15. Aeschines, Or., 3.187

16. Ambrosian Missal 119, Homily On Lazarus, Mary And Martha, 1.115-1.116

17. Andocides, Orations, 1.11-1.20, 1.27-1.28, 1.45, 1.110-1.116

18. Andocides, Orations, 1.11-1.20, 1.27-1.28, 1.45, 1.110-1.116

19. Epigraphy, Ig I , 102

20. Epigraphy, Ig I , 102

21. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1635

22. Justinus, Epitome Historiarum Philippicarum, 5.4.13-5.4.18

23. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 489-491, 488

24. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 6.5, 52.5



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
"moralising, digressive" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
"moralising, implicit" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
ability to handle misfortune Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
aeschines Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
alcibiades, depicted in aristophanes birds Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
alcibiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 204, 426, 543
andokides Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
anger Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
antiphon Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
archinus decree Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
aristophanes, birds Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
asebeia Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
asia, greeks (ionians) of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
athena Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
athenian character Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 207
athens, laws and prescriptions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
athens Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
athens and athenians, and drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
correlation between action and result as a means of moralising Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
crowns, gold crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
cult/cultic Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
cultic regulations Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
darius i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
deipnon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
demeter, eleusinian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
demeter, mysteries of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
denunciation Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
diocleides Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
earth (gaea), heaven and Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
edwards, michael j. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
egypt, egyptian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
eidinow, esther Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
ele(i)ans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
eleusinian cult Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
eleusis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
emotions as a destructive force Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
ephesus and ephesians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
ephēgēsis Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
eubuleus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
eukles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
evaluative phrasing Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
fear Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
furley, william d. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
greed Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
heralds, persian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
hermes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
herms Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 543
hieros logos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
homicide Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
honors, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
impiety (asebeia) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
inscriptions, laws and prescriptions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
juxtaposition, as a means of moralising Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
kindt, julia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
law Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
logos, hieros losgos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
lysias (orator) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
macdowell, douglas m. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
metics Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
miletus and milesians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
mises Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
mother of the gods, and persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
mother of the gods, and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
murray, oswyn Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
mysteries, mystery cults, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
mysteries, profanation of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
oligarchies Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
olympian games Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
olympian truce Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
olympian zeus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 426
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
osiris Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
pederasty, in athens Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 109
pederasty, visual representations of Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 109
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
persia and persians, treaties with greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
phrynichus, oligarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
phyle Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
plato, laws Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
pleonexia Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
plutarch Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
protogonos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
prytaneion Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
queen, of heaven Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
religion, and law Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 65
religion/theology, network theory Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
religion/theology, polis religion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
religious authority, sacred law/prescriptions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
sacred marriage, in comedy Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
samos and samians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
self-seeking Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
siceliots, sicilians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 207
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 204, 207, 426, 543
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 207, 426, 543
simplicity Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
sourvinou-inwood, christiane Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
sparta and spartans, in peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
speeches Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
symposium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
taboo, religious Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
temple robbery Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 65
thirty tyrants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
thrasybulus, son of lycus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
thrasybulus of calydon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
thucydides Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 208
thurii Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
tissaphernes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
todd, s. c. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 331
tyranny, greek attitudes towards Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
tyranny, theology of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
underworld' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 255
xenophon, ps.-xenophon, ath. pol. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 543
xenophon of athens, on alcibiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
xenophon of athens, on spartans Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323
zeus, and kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 323