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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 6.59.4


τυραννεύσας δὲ ἔτη τρία Ἱππίας ἔτι Ἀθηναίων καὶ παυθεὶς ἐν τῷ τετάρτῳ ὑπὸ Λακεδαιμονίων καὶ Ἀλκμεωνιδῶν τῶν φευγόντων, ἐχώρει ὑπόσπονδος ἔς τε Σίγειον καὶ παρ᾽ Αἰαντίδην ἐς Λάμψακον, ἐκεῖθεν δὲ ὡς βασιλέα Δαρεῖον, ὅθεν καὶ ὁρμώμενος ἐς Μαραθῶνα ὕστερον ἔτει εἰκοστῷ ἤδη γέρων ὢν μετὰ Μήδων ἐστράτευσεν.Hippias, after reigning three years longer over the Athenians was deposed in the fourth by the Lacedaemonians and the banished Alcmaeonidae, and went with a safe conduct to Sigeum, and to Aeantides at Lampsacus, and from thence to King Darius; from whose court he set out twenty years after, in his old age, and came with the Medes to Marathon.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 6.39-6.40, 6.57.5, 9.53.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.39. Stesagoras met his end in this way. The sons of Pisistratus sent Miltiades, son of Cimon and brother of the dead Stesagoras, in a trireme to the Chersonese to take control of the country; they had already treated him well at Athens, feigning that they had not been accessory to the death of Cimon his father, which I will relate in another place. ,Reaching the Chersonese, Miltiades kept himself within his house, professing thus to honor the memory of his brother Stesagoras. When the people of the Chersonese learned this, their ruling men gathered together from all the cities on every side, and came together in a group to show fellow-feeling with his mourning; but he put them in bonds. So Miltiades made himself master of the Chersonese; there he maintained a guard of five hundred men, and married Hegesipyle the daughter of Olorus, king of Thrace. 6.40. But not long after this Miltiades son of Cimon had come to the Chersonese, greater difficulties than the present afflictions overtook him. He had been driven from the country three years before this by the Scythians. The nomadic Scythians, provoked by Darius, gathered themselves together and rode as far as the Chersonese. ,Miltiades did not await their attack and fled from the Chersonese, until the Scythians departed and the Dolonci brought him back again. All this had happened three years before the matters that now engaged him.
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.20-1.21, 1.20.2-1.20.3, 1.89, 6.54-6.59, 6.54.1-6.54.2, 6.59.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.20.2. The general Athenian public fancy that Hipparchus was tyrant when he fell by the hands of Harmodius and Aristogiton; not knowing that Hippias, the eldest of the sons of Pisistratus, was really supreme, and that Hipparchus and Thessalus were his brothers; and that Harmodius and Aristogiton suspecting, on the very day, nay at the very moment fixed on for the deed, that information had been conveyed to Hippias by their accomplices, concluded that he had been warned, and did not attack him, yet, not liking to be apprehended and risk their lives for nothing, fell upon Hipparchus near the temple of the daughters of Leos, and slew him as he was arranging the Panathenaic procession. 1.20.3. There are many other unfounded ideas current among the rest of the Hellenes, even on matters of contemporary history which have not been obscured by time. For instance, there is the notion that the Lacedaemonian kings have two votes each, the fact being that they have only one; and that there is a company of Pitane, there being simply no such thing. So little pains do the vulgar take in the investigation of truth, accepting readily the first story that comes to hand. 6.54.1. Indeed, the daring action of Aristogiton and Harmodius was undertaken in consequence of a love affair, which I shall relate at some length, to show that the Athenians are not more accurate than the rest of the world in their accounts of their own tyrants and of the facts of their own history. 6.54.2. Pisistratus dying at an advanced age in possession of the tyranny, was succeeded by his eldest son, Hippias, and not Hipparchus, as is vulgarly believed. Harmodius was then in the flower of youthful beauty, and Aristogiton, a citizen in the middle rank of life, was his lover and possessed him.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
citizenship Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
colony, greek Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
demetrios poliorketes, marriage Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
demosthenes, kin Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
gylon Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
harmodius and aristogeiton Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 376
herodotus Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 376
iphikrates, marriage Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
kyrene Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
mantis, political Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
miltiades, descendants Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
ostracism Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
peisistratids Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 376
peisistratos, sons Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
pentekontaetia Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 376
perikles, citizenship law Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
persian wars Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 376
sicilian expedition' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 529
thrace Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450
thucydides, in opposition to herodotus Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 376
truth Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 376
tyrant Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 450