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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 6.2-6.5


nanIt was settled originally as follows, and the peoples that occupied it are these. The earliest inhabitants spoken of in any part of the country are the Cyclopes and Laestrygones; but I cannot tell of what race they were, or whence they came or whither they went, and must leave my readers to what the poets have said of them and to what may be generally known concerning them. 2 The Sicanians appear to have been the next settlers, although they pretend to have been the first of all and aborigines; but the facts show that they were Iberians, driven by the Ligurians from the river Sicanus in Iberia. It was from them that the island, before called Trinacria, took its name of Sicania, and to the present day they inhabit the west of Sicily. 3 On the fall of Ilium, some of the Trojans escaped from the Achaeans, came in ships to Sicily, and settled next to the Sicanians under the general name of Elymi; their towns being called Eryx and Egesta. With them settled some of the Phocians carried on their way from Troy by a storm, first to Libya, and afterwards from thence to Sicily. 4 The Sicels crossed over to Sicily from their first home Italy, flying from the Opicans, as tradition says and as seems not unlikely, upon rafts, having watched till the wind set down the strait to effect the passage; although perhaps they may have sailed over in some other way. Even at the present day there are still Sicels in Italy; and the country got its name of Italy from Italus, a king of the Sicels, so called. 5 These went with a great host to Sicily, defeated the Sicanians in battle and forced them to remove to the south and west of the island, which thus came to be called Sicily instead of Sicania, and after they crossed over continued to enjoy the richest parts of the country for near three hundred years before any Hellenes came to Sicily; indeed they still hold the centre and north of the island. 6 There were also Phoenicians living all round Sicily, who had occupied promontories upon the sea coasts and the islets adjacent for the purpose of trading with the Sicels. But when the Hellenes began to arrive in considerable numbers by sea, the Phoenicians abandoned most of their stations, and drawing together took up their abode in Motye, Soloeis, and Panormus, near the Elymi, partly because they confided in their alliance, and also because these are the nearest points, for the voyage between Carthage and Sicily.


nannan, It was settled originally as follows, and the peoples that occupied it are these. The earliest inhabitants spoken of in any part of the country are the Cyclopes and Laestrygones; but I cannot tell of what race they were, or whence they came or whither they went, and must leave my readers to what the poets have said of them and to what may be generally known concerning them. ,The Sicanians appear to have been the next settlers, although they pretend to have been the first of all and aborigines; but the facts show that they were Iberians, driven by the Ligurians from the river Sicanus in Iberia . It was from them that the island, before called Trinacaria, took its name of Sicania, and to the present day they inhabit the west of Sicily . ,On the fall of Ilium, some of the Trojans escaped from the Achaeans, came in ships to Sicily, and settled next to the Sicanians under the general name of Elymi; their towns being called Eryx and Egesta . With them settled some of the Phocians carried on their way from Troy by a storm, first to Libya, and afterwards from thence to Sicily . ,The Sicels crossed over to Sicily from their first home Italy, flying from the Opicans, as tradition says and as seems not unlikely, upon rafts, having watched till the wind set down the strait to effect the passage; although perhaps they may have sailed over in some other way. Even at the present day there are still Sicels in Italy ; and the country got its name of Italy from Italus, a king of the Sicels, so called. ,These went with a great host to Sicily, defeated the Sicanians in battle and forced them to remove to the south and west of the island, which thus came to be called Sicily instead of Sicania, and after they crossed over continued to enjoy the richest parts of the country for near three hundred years before any Hellenes came to Sicily ; indeed they still hold the centre and north of the island. ,There were also Phoenicians living all round Sicily, who had occupied promontories upon the sea coasts and the islets adjacent for the purpose of trading with the Sicels. But when the Hellenes began to arrive in considerable numbers by sea, the Phoenicians abandoned most of their stations, and drawing together took up their abode in Motye, Soloeis, and Panormus, near the Elymi, partly because they confided in their alliance, and also because these are the nearest points, for the voyage between Carthage and Sicily .


nanThese were the barbarians in Sicily, settled as I have said. Of the Hellenes, the first to arrive were Chalcidians from Euboea with Thucles, their founder. They founded Naxos and built the altar to Apollo Archegetes, which now stands outside the town, and upon which the deputies for the games sacrifice before sailing from Sicily. 2 Syracuse was founded the year afterwards by Archias, one of the Heraclids from Corinth, who began by driving out the Sicels from the island upon which the inner city now stands, though it is no longer surrounded by water: in process of time the outer town also was taken within the walls and became populous. 3 Meanwhile Thucles and the Chalcidians set out from Naxos in the fifth year after the foundation of Syracuse, and drove out the Sicels by arms and founded Leontini and afterwards Catana; the Catanians themselves choosing Evarchus as their founder.


nannan, These were the barbarians in Sicily, settled as I have said. Of the Hellenes, the first to arrive were Chalcidians from Euboea with Thucles, their founder. They founded Naxos and built the altar to Apollo Archegetes, which now stands outside the town, and upon which the deputies for the games sacrifice before sailing from Sicily . , Syracuse was founded the year afterwards by Archias, one of the Heraclids from Corinth, who began by driving out the Sicels from the island upon which the inner city now stands, though it is no longer surrounded by water: in process of time the outer town also was taken within the walls and became populous. ,Meanwhile Thucles and the Chalcidians set out from Naxos in the fifth year after the foundation of Syracuse, and drove out the Sicels by arms and founded Leontini and afterwards Catana ; the Catanians themselves choosing Evarchus as their founder.


nanAbout the same time Lamis arrived in Sicily with a colony from Megara, and after founding a place called Trotilus beyond the river Pantacyas, and afterwards leaving it and for a short while joining the Chalcidians at Leontini, was driven out by them and founded Thapsus. After his death his companions were driven out of Thapsus, and founded a place called the Hyblaean Megara; Hyblon, a Sicel king, having given up the place and inviting them thither. 2 Here they lived two hundred and forty-five years; after which they were expelled from the city and the country by the Syracusan tyrant Gelo. Before their expulsion, however, a hundred years after they had settled there, they sent out Pamillus and founded Selinus; he having come from their mother country Megara to join them in its foundation. 3 Gela was founded by Antiphemus from Rhodes and Entimus from Crete, who joined in leading a colony thither, in the forty-fifth year after the foundation of Syracuse. The town took its name from the river Gelas, the place where the citadel now stands, and which was first fortified, being called Lindii. The institutions which they adopted were Dorian. 4 Near one hundred and eight years after the foundation of Gela, the Geloans founded Acragas ? Agrigentum — so called from the river of that name, and made Aristonous and Pystilus their founders; giving their own institutions to the colony. 5 Zancle was originally founded by pirates from Cuma, the Chalcidian town in the country of the Opicans: afterwards, however, large numbers came from Chalcis and the rest of Euboea, and helped to people the place; the founders being Perieres and Crataemenes from Cuma and Chalcis respectively. It first had the name of Zancle given it by the Sicels, because the place is shaped like a sickle, which the Sicels call Zanclon; but upon the original settlers being afterwards expelled by some Samians and other Ionians who landed in Sicily flying from the Medes, 6 and the Samians in their turn not long afterwards by Anaxilas, tyrant of Rhegium, the town was by him colonised with a mixed population, and its name changed to Messina, after his old country.


nannan, About the same time Lamis arrived in Sicily with a colony from Megara, and after founding a place called Trotilus beyond the river Pantacyas, and afterwards leaving it and for a short while joining the Chalcidians at Leontini, was driven out by them and founded Thapsus . After his death his companions were driven out of Thapsus, and founded a place called the Hyblaean Megara; Hyblon, a Sicel king, having given up the place and inviting them thither. ,Here they lived two hundred and forty-five years; after which they were expelled from the city and the country by the Syracusan tyrant Gelo. Before their expulsion, however, a hundred years after they had settled there, they sent out Pamillus and founded Selinus ; he having come from their mother country Megara to join them in its foundation. , Gela was founded by Antiphemus from Rhodes and Entimus from Crete, who joined in leading a colony thither, in the forty-fifth year after the foundation of Syracuse . The town took its name from the river Gelas, the place where the citadel now stands, and which was first fortified, being called Lindii. The institutions which they adopted were Dorian. ,Near one hundred and eight years after the foundation of Gela, the Geloans founded Acragas ( Agrigentum ), so called from the river of that name, and made Aristonous and Pystilus their founders; giving their own institutions to the colony. , Zancle was originally founded by pirates from Cuma, the Chalcidian town in the country of the Opicans: afterwards, however, large numbers came from Chalcis and the rest of Euboea, and helped to people the place; the founders being Perieres and Crataemenes from Cuma and Chalcis respectively. It first had the name of Zancle given it by the Sicels, because the place is shaped like a sickle, which the Sicels call Zanclon; but upon the original settlers being afterwards expelled by some Samians and other Ionians who landed in Sicily flying from the Medes, ,and the Samians in their turn not long afterwards by Anaxilas, tyrant of Rhegium, the town was by him colonised with a mixed population, and its name changed to Messina, after his old country.


nanHimera was founded from Zancle by Euclides, Simus, and Sacon, most of those who went to the colony being Chalcidians; though they were joined by some exiles from Syracuse, defeated in a civil war, called the Myletidae. The language was a mixture of Chalcidian and Doric, but the institutions which prevailed were the Chalcidian. 2 Acrae and Casmenae were founded by the Syracusans; Acrae seventy years after Syracuse, Casmenae nearly twenty after Acrae. 3 Camarina was first founded by the Syracusans, close upon a hundred and thirty-five years after the building of Syracuse; its founders being Daxon and Menecolus. But the Camarinaeans being expelled by arms by the Syracusans for having revolted, Hippocrates, tyrant of Gela, some time later receiving their land in ransom for some Syracusan prisoners, resettled Camarina, himself acting as its founder. Lastly, it was again depopulated by Gelo, and settled once more for the third time by the Geloans.


nannan, Himera was founded from Zancle by Euclides, Simus, and Sacon, most of those who went to the colony being Chalcidians; though they were joined by some exiles from Syracuse, defeated in a civil war, called the Myletidae. The language was a mixture of Chalcidian and Doric, but the institutions which prevailed were the Chalcidian. , Acrae and Casmenae were founded by the Syracusans; Acrae seventy years after Syracuse, Casmenae nearly twenty after Acrae . ,Camarina was first founded by the Syracusans, close upon a hundred and thirty-five years after the building of Syracuse ; its founders being Daxon and Menecolus. But the Camarinaeans being expelled by arms by the Syracusans for having revolted, Hippocrates, tyrant of Gela, some time later receiving their land in ransom for some Syracusan prisoners, resettled Camarina, himself acting as its founder. Lastly, it was again depopulated by Gelo, and settled once more for the third time by the Geloans.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Aristophanes, Birds, 1584-1585, 685-704, 712, 724, 736, 1583 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1583. τὰ δὲ κρέα τοῦ ταῦτ' ἐστίν; ὄρνιθές τινες
2. Herodotus, Histories, 1.5.3, 4.152 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.5.3. These are the stories of the Persians and the Phoenicians. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike. 4.152. But after they had been away for longer than the agreed time, and Corobius had no provisions left, a Samian ship sailing for Egypt, whose captain was Colaeus, was driven off her course to Platea, where the Samians heard the whole story from Corobius and left him provisions for a year; ,they then put out to sea from the island and would have sailed to Egypt, but an easterly wind drove them from their course, and did not abate until they had passed through the Pillars of Heracles and came providentially to Tartessus. ,Now this was at that time an untapped market; hence, the Samians, of all the Greeks whom we know with certainty, brought back from it the greatest profit on their wares except Sostratus of Aegina, son of Laodamas; no one could compete with him. ,The Samians took six talents, a tenth of their profit, and made a bronze vessel with it, like an Argolic cauldron, with griffins' heads projecting from the rim all around; they set this up in their temple of Hera, supporting it with three colossal kneeling figures of bronze, each twelve feet high. ,What the Samians had done was the beginning of a close friendship between them and the men of Cyrene and Thera.
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.1-1.20, 1.89-1.118, 1.97.2, 1.126, 1.128-1.135, 2.15, 2.65, 4.81, 5.26, 6.1, 6.1.1, 6.3-6.5, 6.8-6.26, 6.15.3-6.15.4, 6.46.4, 6.54-6.59 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.97.2. My excuse for relating these events, and for venturing on this digression, is that this passage of history has been omitted by all my predecessors, who have confined themselves either to Hellenic history before the Median war, or to the Median war itself. Hellanicus, it is true, did touch on these events in his Athenian history; but he is somewhat concise and not accurate in his dates. Besides, the history of these events contains an explanation of the growth of the Athenian empire. 6.1.1. The same winter the Athenians resolved to sail again to Sicily, with a greater armament than that under Laches and Eurymedon, and, if possible, to conquer the island; most of them being ignorant of its size and of the number of its inhabitants, Hellenic and barbarian, and of the fact that they were undertaking a war not much inferior to that against the Peloponnesians. 6.15.3. For the position he held among the citizens led him to indulge his tastes beyond what his real means would bear, both in keeping horses and in the rest of his expenditure; and this later on had not a little to do with the ruin of the Athenian state. 6.15.4. Alarmed at the greatness of his license in his own life and habits, and of the ambition which he showed in all things soever that he undertook, the mass of the people set him down as a pretender to the tyranny, and became his enemies; and although publicly his conduct of the war was as good as could be desired individually, his habits gave offence to every one, and caused them to commit affairs to other hands, and thus before long to ruin the city. 6.46.4. and as all used pretty nearly the same, and everywhere a great quantity of plate was shown, the effect was most dazzling upon the Athenian sailors, and made them talk loudly of the riches they had seen when they got back to Athens .
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.19.1-4.19.2, 5.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.19.1.  Heracles, then, delivered over the kingdom of the Iberians to the noblest men among the natives and, on his part, took his army and passing into Celtica and traversing the length and breadth of it he put an end to the lawlessness and murdering of strangers to which the people had become addicted; and since a great multitude of men from every tribe flocked to his army of their own accord, he founded a great city which was named Alesia after the "wandering" (alê) on his campaign. 4.19.2.  But he also mingled among the citizens of the city many natives, and since these surpassed the others in multitude, it came to pass that the inhabitants as a whole were barbarized. The Celts up to the present time hold this city in honour, looking upon it as the hearth and mother-city of all Celtica. And for the entire period from the days of Heracles this city remained free and was never sacked until our own time; but at last Gaius Caesar, who has been pronounced a god because of the magnitude of his deeds, took it by storm and made it and the other Celts subjects of the Romans. 5.24. 1.  Since we have set forth the facts concerning the islands which lie in the western regions, we consider that it will not be foreign to our purpose to discuss briefly the tribes of Europe which lie near them and which we failed to mention in our former Books. Now Celtica was ruled in ancient times, so we are told, by a renowned man who had a daughter who was of unusual stature and far excelled in beauty all the other maidens. But she, because of her strength of body and marvellous comeliness, was so haughty that she kept refusing every man who wooed her in marriage, since she believed that no one of her wooers was worthy of her.,2.  Now in the course of his campaign against the Geryones, Heracles visited Celtica and founded there the city of Alesia, and the maiden, on seeing Heracles, wondered at his prowess and his bodily superiority and accepted his embraces with all eagerness, her parents having given their consent.,3.  From this union she bore to Heracles a son named Galates, who far surpassed all the youths of the tribe in quality of spirit and strength of body. And when he had attained to man's estate and had succeeded to the throne of his fathers, he subdued a large part of the neighbouring territory and accomplished great feats in war. Becoming renowned for his bravery, he called his subjects Galatae or Gauls after himself, and these in turn gave their name to all of Galatia or Gaul.
5. Livy, History, 1.7.3-1.7.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Sallust, Catiline, 7, 6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Sallust, Iugurtha, 18-19, 17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aborigines Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
aetiology Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
agamemnon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
agora of athens Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 342
alcibiades Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286, 488
anachronism Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
aristagoras Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
aristophanes Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
athena Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488
athenian exceptionalism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
athens Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
attica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 669
autochthony, athenian Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
bithia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
bitienses Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
cacus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
caralis (city) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
carthage, carthaginians, outposts of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 669
corinth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 669
cyprus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
delphic oracle Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
democracy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
digression Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
diodorus siculus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
egesta Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488
egesteans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488
epic cycle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
epos, epic poetry Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286
ethnography, ethnographies Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
etruria, etruscans Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
euripides Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
evander, king Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
ford, andrew Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
fowler, robert, xxiii, xxiv, xxvi, xxvii, xxviii Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
gods and divinities Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
greece, greeks Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
hawes, greta Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
hercules Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
hipparchos (son of peisistratus) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 669
hippias (son of peisistratus) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 342
history, historian Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 156
home Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
hybridity, hybridities Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
immigration, immigrants, migration Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
ionian revolt Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
italy (italia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
ithaca Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
laistrygones Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
leontinoi Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488
leucosia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
leucothea Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
leukosia (siren) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
livy Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
marriage Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
mediterranean sea Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
migration, immigration, immigrants and nomadism Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
migration Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
miletus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
neapolitani Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 166, 488
nomadism, migration Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
nora, norenses Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
nuraghi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
oceanus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
odysseus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
oenotri Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
oral tradition' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
oreithyia Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
paestum Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
palai Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 156
paradoxography Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
past Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 156
peisetaerus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
peloponnesian war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
pelops Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
phoenicia, phoenicians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
plupast Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
political geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
pylos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
regium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
romulus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
sallust Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
sardinia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
sicily Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50, 488
sikanians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
sikanos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
socrates Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 52
telemachus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
thrinakia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
thucydides, son of melesias, archaeology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286, 342
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 342
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286
thucydides Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 282
timaeus of tauromenion Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
tragedy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
trinacria Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 156
tyranny Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
utopia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 107
water Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16
weather signs (τέρατα) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 16