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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 6.14


nanAnd you, Prytanis, if you think it your duty to care for the commonwealth, and if you wish to show yourself a good citizen, put the question to the vote, and take a second time the opinions of the Athenians. If you are afraid to move the question again, consider that a violation of the law cannot carry any prejudice with so many abettors, that you will be the physician of your misguided city, and that the virtue of men in office is briefly this, to do their country as much good as they can, or in any case no harm that they can avoid.'


nannan, And you, Prytanis, if you think it your duty to care for the commonwealth, and if you wish to show yourself a good citizen, put the question to the vote, and take a second time the opinions of the Athenians. If you are afraid to move the question again, consider that a violation of the law cannot carry any prejudice with so many abettors, that you will be the physician of your misguided city, and that the virtue of men in office is briefly this, to do their country as much good as they can, or in any case no harm that they can avoid.’


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 8.44 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 3.22, 3.25, 3.27, 3.54, 3.59-3.60 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Knights, 191 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

191. ἡ δημαγωγία γὰρ οὐ πρὸς μουσικοῦ
4. Euripides, Hippolytus, 392, 296 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Trojan Women, 886, 889, 885 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

885. whoever you are, a riddle past our knowledge! Zeus, owhether you are natural necessity, or man’s intellect, to you I pray; for, though you tread over a noiseless path, all your dealings with mankind are guided by justice. Menelau
6. Sophocles, Antigone, 905-912, 1113 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Theopompus of Chios, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.22.1, 1.42, 1.46, 1.70, 1.78, 1.81.6, 1.104, 1.114.1, 2.12.4, 2.22.1, 2.49, 2.59.3, 2.62.4-2.62.5, 2.65, 2.65.3-2.65.4, 3.36-3.50, 3.36.6, 3.73, 3.81-3.83, 3.82.4, 4.21.3, 4.28.3, 4.59-4.65, 4.84.2, 4.97-4.98, 4.101, 5.85-5.113, 5.105.3, 6.1-6.5, 6.1.1, 6.8-6.13, 6.12.2, 6.13.1, 6.15-6.34, 6.24.3, 6.32.41, 6.42-6.53, 6.46.4, 6.55, 6.60-6.61, 6.90.2-6.90.3, 8.1.4, 8.45-8.46, 8.96.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.22.1. With reference to the speeches in this history, some were delivered before the war began, others while it was going on; some I heard myself, others I got from various quarters; it was in all cases difficult to carry them word for word in one's memory, so my habit has been to make the speakers say what was in my opinion demanded of them by the various occasions, of course adhering as closely as possible to the general sense of what they really said. 1.81.6. For let us never be elated by the fatal hope of the war being quickly ended by the devastation of their lands. I fear rather that we may leave it as a legacy to our children; so improbable is it that the Athenian spirit will be the slave of their land, or Athenian experience be cowed by war. 1.114.1. This was soon afterwards followed by the revolt of Euboea from Athens . Pericles had already crossed over with an army of Athenians to the island, when news was brought to him that Megara had revolted, that the Peloponnesians were on the point of invading Attica, and that the Athenian garrison had been cut off by the Megarians, with the exception of a few who had taken refuge in Nisaea . The Megarians had introduced the Corinthians, Sicyonians, and Epidaurians into the town before they revolted. Meanwhile Pericles brought his army back in all haste from Euboea . 2.12.4. As soon as he arrived at the camp, and Archidamus learnt that the Athenians had still no thoughts of submitting, he at length began his march, and advanced with his army into their territory. 2.22.1. He, meanwhile, seeing anger and infatuation just now in the ascendant, and confident of his wisdom in refusing a sally, would not call either assembly or meeting of the people, fearing the fatal results of a debate inspired by passion and not by prudence. Accordingly, he addressed himself to the defence of the city, and kept it as quiet as possible 2.59.3. When he saw them exasperated at the present turn of affairs and acting exactly as he had anticipated, he called an assembly, being (it must be remembered) still general, with the double object of restoring confidence and of leading them from these angry feelings to a calmer and more hopeful state of mind. He accordingly came forward and spoke as follows: 2.62.4. Confidence indeed a blissful ignorance can impart, ay, even to a coward's breast, but disdain is the privilege of those who, like us, have been assured by reflection of their superiority to their adversary. 2.62.5. And where the chances are the same, knowledge fortifies courage by the contempt which is its consequence, its trust being placed, not in hope, which is the prop of the desperate, but in a judgment grounded upon existing resources, whose anticipations are more to be depended upon. 2.65.3. In fact, the public feeling against him did not subside until he had been fined. 2.65.4. Not long afterwards, however, according to the way of the multitude, they again elected him general and committed all their affairs to his hands, having now become less sensitive to their private and domestic afflictions, and understanding that he was the best man of all for the public necessities. 3.36.6. An assembly was therefore at once called, and after much expression of opinion upon both sides, Cleon, son of Cleaenetus, the same who had carried the former motion of putting the Mitylenians to death, the most violent man at Athens, and at that time by far the most powerful with the commons, came forward again and spoke as follows:— 3.82.4. Words had to change their ordinary meaning and to take that which was now given them. Reckless audacity came to be considered the courage of a loyal ally; prudent hesitation, specious cowardice; moderation was held to be a cloak for unmanliness; ability to see all sides of a question inaptness to act on any. Frantic violence, became the attribute of manliness; cautious plotting, a justifiable means of self-defence. 4.21.3. Foremost to encourage them in this policy was Cleon, son of Cleaenetus, a popular leader of the time and very powerful with the multitude, who persuaded them to answer as follows: First, the men in the island must surrender themselves and their arms and be brought to Athens . Next; the Lacedaemonians must restore Nisaea, Pegae, Troezen, and Achaia, all places acquired not by arms, but by the previous convention, under which they had been ceded by Athens herself at a moment of disaster, when a truce was more necessary to her than at present. This done they might take back their men, and make a truce for as long as both parties might agree. 4.84.2. The inhabitants were divided into two parties on the question of receiving him; those who had joined the Chalcidians in inviting him, and the popular party. However, fear for their fruit, which was still out, enabled Brasidas to persuade the multitude to admit him alone, and to hear what he had to say before making a decision; and he was admitted accordingly and appeared before the people, and not being a bad speaker for a Lacedaemonian, addressed them as follows:— 5.105.3. Thus, as far as the gods are concerned, we have no fear and no reason to fear that we shall be at a disadvantage. But when we come to your notion about the Lacedaemonians, which leads you to believe that shame will make them help you, here we bless your simplicity but do not envy your folly. 6.1.1. The same winter the Athenians resolved to sail again to Sicily, with a greater armament than that under Laches and Eurymedon, and, if possible, to conquer the island; most of them being ignorant of its size and of the number of its inhabitants, Hellenic and barbarian, and of the fact that they were undertaking a war not much inferior to that against the Peloponnesians. 6.12.2. And if there be any man here, overjoyed at being chosen to command, who urges you to make the expedition, merely for ends of his own—especially if he be still too young to command—who seeks to be admired for his stud of horses, but on account of its heavy expenses hopes for some profit from his appointment, do not allow such an one to maintain his private splendour at his country's risk, but remember that such persons injure the public fortune while they squander their own, and that this is a matter of importance, and not for a young man to decide or hastily to take in hand. 6.13.1. When I see such persons now sitting here at the side of that same individual and summoned by him, alarm seizes me; and I, in my turn, summon any of the older men that may have such a person sitting next him, not to let himself be shamed down, for fear of being thought a coward if he do not vote for war, but, remembering how rarely success is got by wishing and how often by forecast, to leave to them the mad dream of conquest, and as a true lover of his country, now threatened by the greatest danger in its history, to hold up his hand on the other side; to vote that the Siceliots be left in the limits now existing between us, limits of which no one can complain (the Ionian sea for the coasting voyage, and the Sicilian across the open main), to enjoy their own possessions and to settle their own quarrels; 6.24.3. All alike fell in love with the enterprise. The older men thought that they would either subdue the places against which they were to sail, or at all events, with so large a force, meet with no disaster; those in the prime of life felt a longing for foreign sights and spectacles, and had no doubt that they should come safe home again; while the idea of the common people and the soldiery was to earn wages at the moment, and make conquests that would supply a never-ending fund of pay for the future. 6.46.4. and as all used pretty nearly the same, and everywhere a great quantity of plate was shown, the effect was most dazzling upon the Athenian sailors, and made them talk loudly of the riches they had seen when they got back to Athens . 6.90.2. We sailed to Sicily first to conquer, if possible, the Siceliots, and after them the Italiots also, and finally to assail the empire and city of Carthage . 6.90.3. In the event of all or most of these schemes succeeding, we were then to attack Peloponnese, bringing with us the entire force of the Hellenes lately acquired in those parts, and taking a number of barbarians into our pay, such as the Iberians and others in those countries, confessedly the most warlike known, and building numerous galleys in addition to those which we had already, timber being plentiful in Italy ; and with this fleet blockading Peloponnese from the sea and assailing it with our armies by land, taking some of the cities by storm, drawing works of circumvallation round others, we hoped without difficulty to effect its reduction, and after this to rule the whole of the Hellenic name. 8.1.4. In short, as is the way of a democracy, in the panic of the moment they were ready to be as prudent as possible. These resolves were at once carried into effect. 8.96.5. But here, as on so many other occasions the Lacedaemonians proved the most convenient people in the world for the Athenians to be at war with. The wide difference between the two characters, the slowness and want of energy of the Lacedaemonians as contrasted with the dash and enterprise of their opponents, proved of the greatest service, especially to a maritime empire like Athens . Indeed this was shown by the Syracusans, who were most like the Athenians in character, and also most successful in combating them.
9. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Plutarch, Agesilaus, 10.5-10.6, 36.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"fragments of historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
"historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
acting Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215
aeschylus Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115
agesilaus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
alcibiades Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107; Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259, 266, 449, 488
anger Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 216
aristotle Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 216
athenian character Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193, 207, 266
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488, 535
athenian exceptionalism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
athens, political myth of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115
athens Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160; Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215
attica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 266
autochthony, athenian Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
brasidas Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
callipolis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
cleon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 535
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 171, 193, 259
corcyraeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
corinth, corinthian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
corinth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
corinthian gulf Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 449
corinthians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193
daemons and δαίμονες Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
debate Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215
democracy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
dialectic/dialogue Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
diodotus, and euripidean tragedy Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
drunkenness Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
dyseros Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
egesta Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488
egesteans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488
egypt Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
emotions Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 216
epidamnos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
eros Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
etruria Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
euboea Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
euripides, and naturalistic representation of divine forces Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
euripides, parallels between…and thucydides Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
fame (kleos) Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 43
frugality Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
hope, and eros Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 43
hope, and religion Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 43
hope (ἐλπίς) Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
immoderation Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
immortality Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 43
irrational impulses, athenians beset by Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
language Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215
leontinoi Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 488
leucimme Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
lysander Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
macedonia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 535
masculinity Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215, 216
moderation Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
money Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 216
monologue Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
myth, platonic Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
necessity (in thucydides), and divine Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
necessity (in thucydides), and nature (φύσις) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
nicias, and athenian decision for sicilian expedition Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
nicias, athenian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
nicias Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215, 216; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 266, 449, 488, 535; Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
of sōphrosynē Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215
opsis Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
orality, oral performance Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 266
panhellenism Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115
pathos Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 216
peloponnesian war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107; Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215, 216; Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
persuasion Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 216
philip ii of macedon Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 535
phormio Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 449
piraeus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
plato Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
politician Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
politics, athens, political myth of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115
prytanis Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
rhetoric/rhetorical Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215
rhetoric Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
self-discipline Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
sexual immoderation Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
siceliots, sicilians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 207
sicilian debate Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 207, 266, 449, 535; Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
sicily Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193, 207, 488
sight/seeing Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 43
socrates Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
speeches Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 215
spending Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
statues Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
suppliant women aithras intercession with theseus in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115
suppliant women war, deliberation of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115
syracuse, syracusan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107
theopompus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
theoria Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 66
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 266
thucydides, son of melesias, chance Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 535
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 107; Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
timaeus of tauromenium Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 264
tragedy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
tyranny Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
war battle of' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 115
writing Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 160
ēthos Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 216
ἀνάγκη, in euripides Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
ἐλπίς (hope or expectation) and ἐλπίζω and εὔελπις, and sicilian expedition Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136
ἔρως, in euripides (compared with thucydides) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 136