Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 5.46


nanIn the assembly held the next day, Nicias, in spite of the Lacedaemonians having been deceived themselves, and having allowed him to be deceived also in not admitting that they had come with full powers, still maintained that it was best to be friends with the Lacedaemonians, and, letting the Argive proposals stand over, to send once more to Lacedaemon and learn her intentions. The adjournment of the war could only increase their own prestige and injure that of their rivals; the excellent state of their affairs making it their interest to preserve this prosperity as long as possible, while those of Lacedaemon were so desperate that the sooner she could try her fortune again the better. 2 He succeeded accordingly in persuading them to send ambassadors, himself being among the number, to invite the Lacedaemonians, if they were really sincere, to restore Panactum intact with Amphipolis, and to abandon their alliance with the Boeotians — unless they consented to accede to the treaty — agreeably to the stipulation which forbade either party to treat without the other. 3 The ambassadors were also directed to say that the Athenians, had they wished to play false, might already have made alliance with the Argives, who were indeed come to Athens for that very purpose, and went off furnished with instructions as to any other complaints that the Athenians had to make. 4 Having reached Lacedaemon they communicated their instructions, and concluded by telling the Lacedaemonians that unless they gave up their alliance with the Boeotians, in the event of their not acceding to the treaty, the Athenians for their part would ally themselves with the Argives and their friends. The Lacedaemonians, however, refused to give up the Boeotian alliance — the party of Xenares the Ephor, and such as shared their view, carrying the day upon this point — but renewed the oaths at the request of Nicias, who feared to return without having accomplished anything and to be disgraced; as was indeed his fate, he being held the author of the treaty with Lacedaemon. 5 When he returned, and the Athenians heard that nothing had been done at Lacedaemon, they flew into a passion, and deciding that faith had not been kept with them, took advantage of the presence of the Argives and their allies, who had been introduced by Alcibiades, and made a treaty and alliance with them upon the terms following: -


nannan, In the assembly held the next day, Nicias, in spite of the Lacedaemonians having been deceived themselves, and having allowed him to be deceived also in not admitting that they had come with full powers, still maintained that it was best to be friends with the Lacedaemonians, and, letting the Argive proposals stand over, to send once more to Lacedaemon and learn her intentions. The adjournment of the war could only increase their own prestige and injure that of their rivals; the excellent state of their affairs making it their interest to preserve this prosperity as long as possible, while those of Lacedaemon were so desperate that the sooner she could try her fortune again the better. ,He succeeded accordingly in persuading them to send ambassadors, himself being among the number, to invite the Lacedaemonians, if they were really sincere, to restore Panactum intact with Amphipolis, and to abandon their alliance with the Boeotians (unless they consented to accede to the treaty), agreeably to the stipulation which forbade either party to treat without the other. ,The ambassadors were also directed to say that the Athenians, had they wished to play false, might already have made alliance with the Argives, who were indeed come to Athens for that very purpose, and went off furnished with instructions as to any other complaints that the Athenians had to make. ,Having reached Lacedaemon they communicated their instructions, and concluded by telling the Lacedaemonians that unless they gave up their alliance with the Boeotians, in the event of their not acceding to the treaty, the Athenians for their part would ally themselves with the Argives and their friends. The Lacedaemonians, however, refused to give up the Boeotian alliance—the party of Xenares the Ephor, and such as shared their view, carrying the day upon this point—but renewed the oaths at the request of Nicias, who feared to return without having accomplished anything and to be disgraced; as was indeed his fate, he being held the author of the treaty with Lacedaemon . ,When he returned, and the Athenians heard that nothing had been done at Lacedaemon, they flew into a passion, and deciding that faith had not been kept with them, took advantage of the presence of the Argives and their allies, who had been introduced by Alcibiades, and made a treaty and alliance with them upon the terms following:—


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 4.27-4.28, 5.1, 5.11, 5.13, 5.16, 5.18-5.19, 5.23-5.24, 5.26-5.28, 5.43-5.44, 5.52-5.54, 5.56-5.57, 5.70, 5.82-5.83, 5.87, 5.97, 5.102-5.105, 5.113, 6.33-6.34, 7.11-7.15, 8.10, 8.12, 8.14-8.19, 8.35-8.37, 8.44-8.49, 8.52-8.56, 8.66, 8.81-8.82, 8.84, 8.86, 8.89, 8.97 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.7.16-1.7.33 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.7.16. After this Euryptolemus mounted the platform and spoke as follows in defence of the generals: I have come to the platform, men of Athens, partly to accuse Pericles, though he is my kinsman and intimate, and Diomedon, who is my friend, partly 406 B.C. to speak in their defence, and partly to advise the measures which seem to me to be best for the state as a whole.
3. Plutarch, Nicias, 9.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aison Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 22
alciphron Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
aristotle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 25
diogenes laertius Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
lesbos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
lichas, son of arcesilaus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
marcellinus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24, 25
nicias, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24, 166
peace of nicias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
politician, sophocles as Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
schwartz, e. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 25, 28
seneca, philosopher and poet Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 23, 621
sicily, niciass expedition to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
skaptesyle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24, 25
skirphondas Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
sparta, vs. athens Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
strategia, of sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
strategos, sophocles as Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
thespiae Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
thrace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
thrasyl(l)os Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
thucydides, son of melesias, book-division Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 23, 24
thucydides, son of melesias, chronology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 28
thucydides, son of melesias, death Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 23
thucydides, son of melesias, documents, letters, treaties etc. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 22
thucydides, son of melesias, editor, editions in antiquity Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14, 25
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 25
treaty, of nicias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 35
vergil, aeneid Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
vergil Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
xenophon, anabasis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 25
xenophon, hellenica' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
xenophon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14, 25