Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 5.26


nanThe history of this period has been also written by the same Thucydides, and Athenian, in the chronological order of events by summers and winters, to the time when the Lacedaemonians and their allies put an end to the Athenian empire, and took the Long Walls and Piraeus. The war had then lasted for twenty-seven years in all. 2 Only a mistaken judgment can object to including the interval of treaty in the war. Looked at by the light of facts it cannot, it will be found, be rationally considered a state of peace, where neither party either gave or got back all that they had agreed, apart from the violations of it which occurred on both sides in the Mantinean and Epidaurian wars and other instances, and the fact that the allies in the direction of Thrace were in as open hostility as ever, while the Boeotians had only a truce renewed every ten days. 3 So that the first ten years' war, the treacherous armistice that followed it, and the subsequent war will, calculating by the seasons, be found to make up the number of years which I have mentioned, with the difference of a few days, and to afford an instance of faith in oracles being for once justified by the event. 4 I certainly all along remember from the beginning to the end of the war its being commonly declared that it would last thrice nine years. 5 I lived through the whole of it, being of an age to comprehend events, and giving my attention to them in order to know the exact truth about them. It was also my fate to be an exile from my country for twenty years after my command at Amphipolis; and being present with both parties, and more especially with the Peloponnesians by reason of my exile, I had leisure to observe affairs somewhat particularly. 6 I will accordingly now relate the differences that arose after the ten years' war, the breach of the treaty, and the hostilities that followed.


nannan, The history of this period has been also written by the same Thucydides, an Athenian, in the chronological order of events by summers and winters, to the time when the Lacedaemonians and their allies put an end to the Athenian empire, and took the Long Walls and Piraeus . The war had then lasted for twenty-seven years in all. ,Only a mistaken judgment can object to including the interval of treaty in the war. Looked at by the light of facts it cannot, it will be found, be rationally considered a state of peace, where neither party either gave or got back all that they had agreed, apart from the violations of it which occurred on both sides in the Mantinean and Epidaurian wars and other instances, and the fact that the allies in the direction of Thrace were in as open hostility as ever, while the Boeotians had only a truce renewed every ten days. ,So that the first ten years' war, the treacherous armistice that followed it, and the subsequent war will, calculating by the seasons, be found to make up the number of years which I have mentioned, with the difference of a few days, and to afford an instance of faith in oracles being for once justified by the event. , I certainly all along remember from the beginning to the end of the war its being commonly declared that it would last thrice nine years. ,I lived through the whole of it, being of an age to comprehend events, and giving my attention to them in order to know the exact truth about them. It was also my fate to be an exile from my country for twenty years after my command at Amphipolis ; and being present with both parties, and more especially with the Peloponnesians by reason of my exile, I had leisure to observe affairs somewhat particularly. ,I will accordingly now relate the differences that arose after the ten years' war, the breach of the treaty, and the hostilities that followed.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.5.3 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.5.3. These are the stories of the Persians and the Phoenicians. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike.
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.2-1.19, 1.89-1.118, 1.126, 1.128-1.135, 2.47, 2.54, 2.65, 3.37, 3.41-3.42, 4.27-4.28, 4.81, 5.16.1, 5.18, 5.23, 5.27-5.28, 5.43-5.44, 5.46, 5.52-5.54, 5.56-5.57, 5.70, 5.82-5.83, 5.87, 5.97, 5.102-5.105, 5.103.1, 5.112.2, 5.113, 6.2-6.5, 6.15.2-6.15.4, 6.30.2, 6.31.6, 6.54-6.59, 6.90.2-6.90.3, 8.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.16.1. Now, however, after the Athenian defeat at Amphipolis, and the death of Cleon and Brasidas, who had been the two principal opponents of peace on either side—the latter from the success and honor which war gave him, the former because he thought that, if tranquillity were restored, his crimes would be more open to detection and his slanders less credited—the foremost candidates for power in either city, Pleistoanax, son of Pausanias, king of Lacedaemon, and Nicias, son of Niceratus, the most fortunate general of his time, each desired peace more ardently than ever. Nicias, while still happy and honored, wished to secure his good fortune, to obtain a present release from trouble for himself and his countrymen, and hand down to posterity a name as an ever-successful statesman, and thought the way to do this was to keep out of danger and commit himself as little as possible to fortune, and that peace alone made this keeping out of danger possible. Pleistoanax, again, was assailed by his enemies for his restoration, and regularly held up by them to the prejudice of his countrymen, upon every reverse that befell them, as though his unjust restoration were the cause; 5.103.1. ‘Hope, danger's comforter, may be indulged in by those who have abundant resources, if not without loss at all events without ruin; but its nature is to be extravagant, and those who go so far as to put their all upon the venture see it in its true colors only when they are ruined; but so long as the discovery would enable them to guard against it, it is never found wanting. 5.112.2. ‘Our resolution, Athenians, is the same as it was at first. We will not in a moment deprive of freedom a city that has been inhabited these seven hundred years; but we put our trust in the fortune by which the gods have preserved it until now, and in the help of men, that is, of the Lacedaemonians; and so we will try and save ourselves. 6.15.2. By far the warmest advocate of the expedition was, however, Alcibiades, son of Clinias, who wished to thwart Nicias both as his political opponent and also because of the attack he had made upon him in his speech, and who was, besides, exceedingly ambitious of a command by which he hoped to reduce Sicily and Carthage, and personally to gain in wealth and reputation by means of his successes. 6.15.3. For the position he held among the citizens led him to indulge his tastes beyond what his real means would bear, both in keeping horses and in the rest of his expenditure; and this later on had not a little to do with the ruin of the Athenian state. 6.15.4. Alarmed at the greatness of his license in his own life and habits, and of the ambition which he showed in all things soever that he undertook, the mass of the people set him down as a pretender to the tyranny, and became his enemies; and although publicly his conduct of the war was as good as could be desired individually, his habits gave offence to every one, and caused them to commit affairs to other hands, and thus before long to ruin the city. 6.30.2. With them also went down the whole population, one may say, of the city, both citizens and foreigners; the inhabitants of the country each escorting those that belonged to them, their friends, their relatives, or their sons, with hope and lamentation upon their way, as they thought of the conquests which they hoped to make, or of the friends whom they might never see again, considering the long voyage which they were going to make from their country. 6.31.6. Indeed the expedition became not less famous for its wonderful boldness and for the splendour of its appearance, than for its overwhelming strength as compared with the peoples against whom it was directed, and for the fact that this was the longest passage from home hitherto attempted, and the most ambitious in its objects considering the resources of those who undertook it. 6.90.2. We sailed to Sicily first to conquer, if possible, the Siceliots, and after them the Italiots also, and finally to assail the empire and city of Carthage . 6.90.3. In the event of all or most of these schemes succeeding, we were then to attack Peloponnese, bringing with us the entire force of the Hellenes lately acquired in those parts, and taking a number of barbarians into our pay, such as the Iberians and others in those countries, confessedly the most warlike known, and building numerous galleys in addition to those which we had already, timber being plentiful in Italy ; and with this fleet blockading Peloponnese from the sea and assailing it with our armies by land, taking some of the cities by storm, drawing works of circumvallation round others, we hoped without difficulty to effect its reduction, and after this to rule the whole of the Hellenic name.
3. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.7.16-1.7.33 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.7.16. After this Euryptolemus mounted the platform and spoke as follows in defence of the generals: I have come to the platform, men of Athens, partly to accuse Pericles, though he is my kinsman and intimate, and Diomedon, who is my friend, partly 406 B.C. to speak in their defence, and partly to advise the measures which seem to me to be best for the state as a whole.
4. Cicero, Brutus, 29 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Brutus, 29 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

29. huic aetati suppares Alcibiades Critias Critias vulg. : Critas L Theramenes; quibus temporibus quod dicendi genus viguerit ex Thucydidi scriptis, qui ipse tum fuit, intellegi maxime potest. Grandes erant verbis, crebri crebri F2 : crebris L sententiis, compressione compressione L : comprehensione Stangl rerum breves et ob eam ipsam causam interdum subobscuri.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aison Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
alcibiades Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 144; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 22, 286, 716
alciphron Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
aristotle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 25
artemis, ephesian artemis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 705
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 19
attic dialect Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 704
cicero Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 716
cleon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 458
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 143
danger, hope as a dangerous emotion/state of mind Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 144
diodorus siculus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 716, 741
diodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 458
diogenes laertius Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14, 705
dionysius of halicarnassus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 741
epos, epic poetry Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286
harpocration Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 716
hellenica oxyrrhynchia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 704
kynossema Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 741
larkin, ph. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 421
lesbos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
lichas, son of arcesilaus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
marcellinus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24, 25
melian dialogue Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 144
nepos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 716
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24, 458
philochorus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 15
plataea Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 421
plataeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 421
pleistoanax Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 458
plutarch Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 19, 741
politics, hope in greek and roman Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 144
schwartz, e. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 15, 25, 28
seneca, philosopher and poet Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
sicilian expedition Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 144; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 23, 458, 621
skaptesyle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 19, 24, 25
skirphondas Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
sophists, sophistic movement' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 143
thespiae Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
thirty tyrants Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 19
thrace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 15, 19, 24
thrasyl(l)os Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
thucydides, son of melesias, archaeology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286
thucydides, son of melesias, book-division Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 23, 24, 716, 741
thucydides, son of melesias, causes, causality Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 741
thucydides, son of melesias, chronology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 28
thucydides, son of melesias, death Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 23
thucydides, son of melesias, documents, letters, treaties etc. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 22
thucydides, son of melesias, editor, editions in antiquity Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14, 25, 704, 705, 716, 741
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 15, 25
thucydides, son of melesias, generalship Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 705
thucydides, son of melesias, historical truth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 741
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript tradition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 704, 741
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286
vergil, aeneid Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
vergil Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
xenophon, anabasis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 25
xenophon, cynegeticus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 704
xenophon, hellenica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
xenophon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14, 15, 25