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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 5.19


nanThe treaty begins from the Ephoralty of Pleistolas in Lacedaemon, on the 27th day of the month of Artemisium, and from the Archonship of Alcaeus at Athens, on the 25th day of the month of Elaphebolion. 2 Those who took the oath and poured the libations for the Lacedaemonians were Pleistoanax, Agis, Pleistolas, Damagetus, Chionis, Metagenes, Acanthus, Daithus, Ischagoras, Philocharidas, Zeuxidas, Antippus, Tellis, Alcinadas, Empedias, Menas, and Laphilus; for the Athenians, Lampon, Isthmionicus, Nicias, Laches, Euthydemus, Procles, Pythodorus, Hagnon, Myrtilus, Thrasycles, Theagenes, Aristocrates, Iolcius, Timocrates, Leon, Lamachus and Demosthenes.


nannan, The treaty begins from the Ephoralty of Pleistolas in Lacedaemon, on the 27th day of the month of Artemisium, and from the Archonship of Alcaeus at Athens, on the 25th day of the month of Elaphebolion. ,Those who took the oath and poured the libations for the Lacedaemonians were Pleistoanax, Agis, Pleistolas, Damagetus, Chionis, Metagenes, Acanthus, Daithus, Ischagoras, Philocharidas, Zeuxidas, Antippus, Tellis, Alcinadas, Empedias, Menas, and Laphilus; for the Athenians, Lampon, Isthmionicus, Nicias, Laches, Euthydemus, Procles, Pythodorus, Hagnon, Myrtilus, Thrasycles, Theagenes, Aristocrates, Iolcius, Timocrates, Leon, Lamachus and Demosthenes.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Aristophanes, Knights, 1126-1150, 1321-1322, 396, 1125 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1125. αὐτός τε γὰρ ἥδομαι
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.139.1, 1.140.4-1.140.5, 2.20.4, 2.21.3, 2.58.1, 2.59.1-2.59.2, 2.63.2, 2.65, 2.65.4, 4.27-4.28, 4.28.5, 4.102, 5.1, 5.11, 5.13, 5.16, 5.16.1, 5.18, 5.23-5.24, 5.27-5.28, 5.43-5.44, 5.46, 5.52-5.54, 5.56-5.57, 5.70, 5.82-5.83, 7.11-7.15, 8.10, 8.12, 8.14-8.19, 8.15.1, 8.35-8.37, 8.44-8.49, 8.52-8.56, 8.66, 8.81-8.82, 8.84, 8.86, 8.89, 8.97 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.139.1. To return to the Lacedaemonians. The history of their first embassy, the injunctions which it conveyed, and the rejoinder which it provoked, concerning the expulsion of the accursed persons, have been related already. It was followed by a second, which ordered Athens to raise the siege of Potidaea, and to respect the independence of Aegina . Above all, it gave her most distinctly to understand that war might be prevented by the revocation of the Megara decree, excluding the Megarians from the use of Athenian harbors and of the market of Athens . 1.140.4. I hope that you will none of you think that we shall be going to war for a trifle if we refuse to revoke the Megara decree, which appears in front of their complaints, and the revocation of which is to save us from war, or let any feeling of self-reproach linger in your minds, as if you went to war for slight cause. 1.140.5. Why, this trifle contains the whole seal and trial of your resolution. If you give way, you will instantly have to meet some greater demand, as having been frightened into obedience in the first instance; while a firm refusal will make them clearly understand that they must treat you more as equals. 2.21.3. Knots were formed in the streets and engaged in hot discussion; for if the proposed sally was warmly recommended, it was also in some cases opposed. Oracles of the most various import were recited by the collectors, and found eager listeners in one or other of the disputants. Foremost in pressing for the sally were the Acharnians, as constituting no small part of the army of the state, and as it was their land that was being ravaged. In short, the whole city was in a most excited state; Pericles was the object of general indignation; his previous counsels were totally forgotten; he was abused for not leading out the army which he commanded, and was made responsible for the whole of the public suffering. 2.58.1. The same summer Hagnon, son of Nicias, and Cleopompus, son of Clinias, the colleagues of Pericles, took the armament of which he had lately made use, and went off upon an expedition against the Chalcidians in the direction of Thrace and Potidaea, which was still under siege. As soon as they arrived, they brought up their engines against Potidaea and tried every means of taking it 2.59.1. After the second invasion of the Peloponnesians a change came over the spirit of the Athenians. Their land had now been twice laid waste; and war and pestilence at once pressed heavy upon them. 2.59.2. They began to find fault with Pericles, as the author of the war and the cause of all their misfortunes, and became eager to come to terms with Lacedaemon, and actually sent ambassadors thither, who did not however succeed in their mission. Their despair was now complete and all vented itself upon Pericles. 2.63.2. Besides, to recede is no longer possible, if indeed any of you in the alarm of the moment has become enamored of the honesty of such an unambitious part. For what you hold is, to speak somewhat plainly, a tyranny; to take it perhaps was wrong, but to let it go is unsafe. 2.65.4. Not long afterwards, however, according to the way of the multitude, they again elected him general and committed all their affairs to his hands, having now become less sensitive to their private and domestic afflictions, and understanding that he was the best man of all for the public necessities. 5.16.1. Now, however, after the Athenian defeat at Amphipolis, and the death of Cleon and Brasidas, who had been the two principal opponents of peace on either side—the latter from the success and honor which war gave him, the former because he thought that, if tranquillity were restored, his crimes would be more open to detection and his slanders less credited—the foremost candidates for power in either city, Pleistoanax, son of Pausanias, king of Lacedaemon, and Nicias, son of Niceratus, the most fortunate general of his time, each desired peace more ardently than ever. Nicias, while still happy and honored, wished to secure his good fortune, to obtain a present release from trouble for himself and his countrymen, and hand down to posterity a name as an ever-successful statesman, and thought the way to do this was to keep out of danger and commit himself as little as possible to fortune, and that peace alone made this keeping out of danger possible. Pleistoanax, again, was assailed by his enemies for his restoration, and regularly held up by them to the prejudice of his countrymen, upon every reverse that befell them, as though his unjust restoration were the cause; 8.15.1. While the revolted places were all engaged in fortifying and preparing for the war, news of Chios speedily reached Athens . The Athenians thought the danger by which they were now menaced great and unmistakable, and that the rest of their allies would not consent to keep quiet after the secession of the greatest of their number. In the consternation of the moment they at once took off the penalty attaching to whoever proposed or put to the vote a proposal for using the thousand talents which they had jealously avoided touching throughout the whole war, and voted to employ them to man a large number of ships, and to send off at once under Strombichides, son of Diotimus, the eight vessels, forming part of the blockading fleet at Spiraeum, which had left the blockade and had returned after pursuing and failing to overtake the vessels with Chalcideus. These were to be followed shortly afterwards by twelve more under Thrasycles, also taken from the blockade.
3. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.3.30 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.3.30. Now to let you know that this man’s present doings are nothing new, but that he is, rather, a traitor by nature, I will recall to you his past deeds. This man in the beginning, although he had received honours at the hands of the democracy, was extremely eager, like his father Hagnon, to change the democracy into the oligarchy of the Four Hundred, See note on I. vii. 28. and he was a leader in that government. When, 404 B.C. however, he perceived that some opposition to the oligarchy was gathering, he look the lead again—as champion of the democrats against the oligarchs! That is the reason, you know, why he is nicknamed Buskin :
4. Xenophon, Constitution of The Athenians, 2.18 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Plutarch, Pericles, 32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acharnians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
akamantis tribe Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 636
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 22, 505
alethestate prophasis' Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 191
amphiaraus, peace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
aristophanes, on the probouloi Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 639
armistice / truce / alliance ofnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 505, 602
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
attic dialect Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 505
aïgeis tribe Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 636
dicaeopolis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
diogenes laertius Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
eion Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 602
hagnon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 639
hermippus (comic poet), fates Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
herodotus Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 191
lycurgus Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 191
lykidas Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 191
marcellinus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
megara Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 191
megarian decree Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 191
nicias, and hagnon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 639
nicias, career of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 636
nicias, peace of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 636
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
olynthians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 602
pallene Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 602
peace of nicias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 636
peloponnesian war Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 191
plague Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
plato Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
probouloi Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 639
schwartz, e. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 28, 29
scionaeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 602
scione Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 602
seneca, philosopher and poet Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
skaptesyle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
strategos ex hapantōn Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 636
theramenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 639
thrace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 505
thucydides, son of melesias, book-division Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
thucydides, son of melesias, chronology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 28
thucydides, son of melesias, documents, letters, treaties etc. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 22
thucydides, son of melesias, editor, editions in antiquity Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 505, 602
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
vergil, aeneid Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
vergil Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 24
xenophon, hellenica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
xenophon, ps.-xenophon, ath. pol. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552
xenophon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 14
zeus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 552