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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 5.113


nanSuch was the answer of the Melians. The Athenians now departing from the conference said, 'Well, you alone, as it seems to us, judging from these resolutions, regard what is future as more certain than what is before your eyes, and what is out of sight, in your eagerness, as already coming to pass; and as you have staked most on, and trusted most in, the Lacedaemonians, your fortune, and your hopes, so will you be most completely deceived.'


nannan, Such was the answer of the Melians. The Athenians now departing from the conference said, ‘Well, you alone, as it seems to us, judging from these resolutions, regard what is future as more certain than what is before your eyes, and what is out of sight, in your eagerness, as already coming to pass; and as you have staked most on, and trusted most in, the Lacedaemonians, your fortune, and your hopes, so will you be most completely deceived.’


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Esther, 3.8, 9.5, 9.7-9.10, 9.13-9.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.8. וַיֹּאמֶר הָמָן לַמֶּלֶךְ אֲחַשְׁוֵרוֹשׁ יֶשְׁנוֹ עַם־אֶחָד מְפֻזָּר וּמְפֹרָד בֵּין הָעַמִּים בְּכֹל מְדִינוֹת מַלְכוּתֶךָ וְדָתֵיהֶם שֹׁנוֹת מִכָּל־עָם וְאֶת־דָּתֵי הַמֶּלֶךְ אֵינָם עֹשִׂים וְלַמֶּלֶךְ אֵין־שֹׁוֶה לְהַנִּיחָם׃ 9.5. וַיַּכּוּ הַיְּהוּדִים בְּכָל־אֹיְבֵיהֶם מַכַּת־חֶרֶב וְהֶרֶג וְאַבְדָן וַיַּעֲשׂוּ בְשֹׂנְאֵיהֶם כִּרְצוֹנָם׃ 9.7. וְאֵת פַּרְשַׁנְדָּתָא וְאֵת דַּלְפוֹן וְאֵת אַסְפָּתָא׃ 9.8. וְאֵת פּוֹרָתָא וְאֵת אֲדַלְיָא וְאֵת אֲרִידָתָא׃ 9.9. וְאֵת פַּרְמַשְׁתָּא וְאֵת אֲרִיסַי וְאֵת אֲרִדַי וְאֵת וַיְזָתָא׃ 9.13. וַתֹּאמֶר אֶסְתֵּר אִם־עַל־הַמֶּלֶךְ טוֹב יִנָּתֵן גַּם־מָחָר לַיְּהוּדִים אֲשֶׁר בְּשׁוּשָׁן לַעֲשׂוֹת כְּדָת הַיּוֹם וְאֵת עֲשֶׂרֶת בְּנֵי־הָמָן יִתְלוּ עַל־הָעֵץ׃ 9.14. וַיֹּאמֶר הַמֶּלֶךְ לְהֵעָשׂוֹת כֵּן וַתִּנָּתֵן דָּת בְּשׁוּשָׁן וְאֵת עֲשֶׂרֶת בְּנֵי־הָמָן תָּלוּ׃ 3.8. And Haman said unto king Ahasuerus: ‘There is a certain people scattered abroad and dispersed among the peoples in all the provinces of thy kingdom; and their laws are diverse from those of every people; neither keep they the king’s laws; therefore it profiteth not the king to suffer them." 9.5. And the Jews smote all their enemies with the stroke of the sword, and with slaughter and destruction, and did what they would unto them that hated them." 9.7. And Parshandatha, and Dalphon, and Aspatha," 9.8. and Poratha, and Adalia, and Aridatha," 9.9. and Parmashta, and Arisai, and Aridai, and Vaizatha," 9.10. the ten sons of Haman the son of Hammedatha, the Jews’enemy, slew they; but on the spoil they laid not their hand." 9.13. Then said Esther: ‘If it please the king, let it be granted to the Jews that are in Shushan to do to-morrow also according unto this day’s decree, and let Haman’s ten sons be hanged upon the gallows.’" 9.14. And the king commanded it so to be done; and a decree was given out in Shushan; and they hanged Haman’s ten sons."
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.22.1, 1.140.1, 2.27, 2.42-2.43, 2.62.5, 3.2-3.3, 3.3.1, 3.36-3.50, 3.36.6, 3.42.1, 3.42.5, 3.44.4, 3.46.1, 3.52, 3.73, 3.81-3.83, 4.27-4.29, 4.108.4, 5.14.1-5.14.2, 5.26, 5.46, 5.52, 5.83-5.112, 5.103.1-5.103.2, 5.112.2, 5.114-5.116, 6.8-6.26, 6.9.3, 6.11.4, 6.13.1, 6.15.2, 6.24.3, 8.45-8.46 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.22.1. With reference to the speeches in this history, some were delivered before the war began, others while it was going on; some I heard myself, others I got from various quarters; it was in all cases difficult to carry them word for word in one's memory, so my habit has been to make the speakers say what was in my opinion demanded of them by the various occasions, of course adhering as closely as possible to the general sense of what they really said. 1.140.1. ‘There is one principle, Athenians, which I hold to through everything, and that is the principle of no concession to the Peloponnesians. I know that the spirit which inspires men while they are being persuaded to make war, is not always retained in action; that as circumstances change, resolutions change. Yet I see that now as before the same, almost literally the same, counsel is demanded of me; and I put it to those of you, who are allowing yourselves to be persuaded, to support the national resolves even in the case of reverses, or to forfeit all credit for their wisdom in the event of success. For sometimes the course of things is as arbitrary as the plans of man; indeed this is why we usually blame chance for whatever does not happen as we expected. 2.62.5. And where the chances are the same, knowledge fortifies courage by the contempt which is its consequence, its trust being placed, not in hope, which is the prop of the desperate, but in a judgment grounded upon existing resources, whose anticipations are more to be depended upon. 3.3.1. However, the Athenians, distressed by the plague, and by the war that had recently broken out and was now raging, thought it a serious matter to add Lesbos with its fleet and untouched resources to the list of their enemies; and at first would not believe the charge, giving too much weight to their wish that it might not be true. But when an embassy which they sent had failed to persuade the Mitylenians to give up the union and preparations complained of, they became alarmed, and resolved to strike the first blow. 3.36.6. An assembly was therefore at once called, and after much expression of opinion upon both sides, Cleon, son of Cleaenetus, the same who had carried the former motion of putting the Mitylenians to death, the most violent man at Athens, and at that time by far the most powerful with the commons, came forward again and spoke as follows:— 3.42.1. ‘I do not blame the persons who have reopened the case of the Mitylenians, nor do I approve the protests which we have heard against important questions being frequently debated. I think the two things most opposed to good counsel are haste and passion; haste usually goes hand in hand with folly, passion with coarseness and narrowness of mind. 3.42.5. The good citizen ought to triumph not by frightening his opponents but by beating them fairly in argument; and a wise city without over-distinguishing its best advisers, will nevertheless not deprive them of their due, and far from punishing an unlucky counsellor will not even regard him as disgraced. 3.44.4. And I require you not to reject my useful considerations for his specious ones: his speech may have the attraction of seeming the more just in your present temper against Mitylene ; but we are not in a court of justice, but in a political assembly; and the question is not justice, but how to make the Mitylenians useful to Athens . 3.46.1. We must not, therefore, commit ourselves to a false policy through a belief in the efficacy of the punishment of death, or exclude rebels from the hope of repentance and an early atonement of their error. 4.108.4. Indeed there seemed to be no danger in so doing; their mistake in their estimate of the Athenian power was as great as that power afterwards turned out to be, and their judgment was based more upon blind wishing than upon any sound prevision; for it is a habit of mankind to entrust to careless hope what they long for, and to use sovereign reason to thrust aside what they do not fancy. 5.14.1. Indeed it so happened that directly after the battle of Amphipolis and the retreat of Ramphias from Thessaly, both sides ceased to prosecute the war and turned their attention to peace. Athens had suffered severely at Delium, and again shortly afterwards at Amphipolis, and had no longer that confidence in her strength which had made her before refuse to treat, in the belief of ultimate victory which her success at the moment had inspired; 5.14.2. besides, she was afraid of her allies being tempted by her reverses to rebel more generally, and repented having let go the splendid opportunity for peace which the affair of Pylos had offered. 5.103.1. ‘Hope, danger's comforter, may be indulged in by those who have abundant resources, if not without loss at all events without ruin; but its nature is to be extravagant, and those who go so far as to put their all upon the venture see it in its true colors only when they are ruined; but so long as the discovery would enable them to guard against it, it is never found wanting. 5.103.2. Let not this be the case with you, who are weak and hang on a single turn of the scale; nor be like the vulgar, who, abandoning such security as human means may still afford, when visible hopes fail them in extremity, turn to invisible, to prophecies and oracles, and other such inventions that delude men with hopes to their destruction.’ 5.112.2. ‘Our resolution, Athenians, is the same as it was at first. We will not in a moment deprive of freedom a city that has been inhabited these seven hundred years; but we put our trust in the fortune by which the gods have preserved it until now, and in the help of men, that is, of the Lacedaemonians; and so we will try and save ourselves. 6.9.3. Against your character any words of mine would be weak enough; if I were to advise your keeping what you have got and not risking what is actually yours for advantages which are dubious in themselves, and which you may or may not attain. I will, therefore, content myself with showing that your ardour is out of season, and your ambition not easy of accomplishment. 6.11.4. The Hellenes in Sicily would fear us most if we never went there at all, and next to this, if after displaying our power we went away again as soon as possible. We all know that that which is farthest off and the reputation of which can least be tested, is the object of admiration; at the least reverse they would at once begin to look down upon us, and would join our enemies here against us. 6.13.1. When I see such persons now sitting here at the side of that same individual and summoned by him, alarm seizes me; and I, in my turn, summon any of the older men that may have such a person sitting next him, not to let himself be shamed down, for fear of being thought a coward if he do not vote for war, but, remembering how rarely success is got by wishing and how often by forecast, to leave to them the mad dream of conquest, and as a true lover of his country, now threatened by the greatest danger in its history, to hold up his hand on the other side; to vote that the Siceliots be left in the limits now existing between us, limits of which no one can complain (the Ionian sea for the coasting voyage, and the Sicilian across the open main), to enjoy their own possessions and to settle their own quarrels; 6.15.2. By far the warmest advocate of the expedition was, however, Alcibiades, son of Clinias, who wished to thwart Nicias both as his political opponent and also because of the attack he had made upon him in his speech, and who was, besides, exceedingly ambitious of a command by which he hoped to reduce Sicily and Carthage, and personally to gain in wealth and reputation by means of his successes. 6.24.3. All alike fell in love with the enterprise. The older men thought that they would either subdue the places against which they were to sail, or at all events, with so large a force, meet with no disaster; those in the prime of life felt a longing for foreign sights and spectacles, and had no doubt that they should come safe home again; while the idea of the common people and the soldiery was to earn wages at the moment, and make conquests that would supply a never-ending fund of pay for the future.
3. Aeschines, Letters, 2.115, 3.107-3.109 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, preferred to verbal constructions Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
aison Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
alciphron Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
articular infinitive Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
athenian character Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193
athenians at melos (speech of), self-confident tone of…about necessity Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
athens Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75, 76; Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 74
athens and athenians, and mytilenean revolt Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
choice (primarily in thucydides), and freedom Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 298
choice (primarily in thucydides), impairment / erasure of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 296, 298
cleon Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 143
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193
corinthians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193
desire, and human nature Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 296
destruction Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75, 76
diodorus siculus Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 31
diodotus Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157; Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 143
ephorus Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 31
genocide Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75, 76
greece Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 76
honor Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75
invisible things (τὰ ἀφανῆ) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157, 296, 298
irrational impulses, and choice Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 296, 298
irrational impulses, and human nature Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 296, 298
irrational impulses, athenians beset by Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
irrational impulses, dominating intellect Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 296, 298
law, international Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 404
legitimacy Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75, 76
lesbos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
lichas, son of arcesilaus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
melian dialogue Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 404; Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 143
melos/melians Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 31
melos Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75; Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 74
military Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 76
mytilene, secession of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
mytilene Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75
mytilenean debate Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 404
narrative Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75, 76
nicias Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 31
peloponnesian war Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 74
pericles, exceptionality of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 298
persia Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75
phrynichos (politician) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 450
political theory, and law. Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 404
politics, hope in greek and roman Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 143
power Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 76
rebellion (rebel) Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75
revenge Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75
rome Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 76
sicilian debate Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 193, 450
skirphondas Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
sparta/spartans Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 31
status Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75, 76
story Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75
thespiae Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
thracian allies of athens Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 296, 298
thrasyl(l)os Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 621
threat of violence Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 75, 76
thucydides Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 404; Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 31
trojan women (euripides), historical context' Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 74
trojan women (euripides) Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 74
τὸ ἀνθρώπινον and τὸ ἀνθρώπειον (the human), beyond human control Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
τὸ ἀνθρώπινον and τὸ ἀνθρώπειον (the human), in melian dialogue Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
ἐλπίς (hope or expectation) and ἐλπίζω and εὔελπις, and melian dialogue Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
ἐλπίς (hope or expectation) and ἐλπίζω and εὔελπις, and sicilian expedition Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
ἐλπίς (hope or expectation) and ἐλπίζω and εὔελπις, and thracian allies Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 296, 298
ἐλπίς (hope or expectation) and ἐλπίζω and εὔελπις, diodotus on Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157
ἔρως, and sicilian expedition Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 157