Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 5.10.9


τὸ δὲ δεξιὸν τῶν Ἀθηναίων ἔμενέ [τε] μᾶλλον, καὶ ὁ μὲν Κλέων, ὡς τὸ πρῶτον οὐ διενοεῖτο μένειν, εὐθὺς φεύγων καὶ καταληφθεὶς ὑπὸ Μυρκινίου πελταστοῦ ἀποθνῄσκει, οἱ δὲ αὐτοῦ ξυστραφέντες ὁπλῖται ἐπὶ τὸν λόφον τόν τε Κλεαρίδαν ἠμύνοντο καὶ δὶς ἢ τρὶς προσβαλόντα, καὶ οὐ πρότερον ἐνέδοσαν πρὶν ἥ τε Μυρκινία καὶ ἡ Χαλκιδικὴ ἵππος καὶ οἱ πελτασταὶ περιστάντες καὶ ἐσακοντίζοντες αὐτοὺς ἔτρεψαν.The Athenian right made a better stand, and though Cleon, who from the first had no thought of fighting, at once fled and was overtaken and slain by a Myrcinian targeteer, his infantry forming in close order upon the hill twice or thrice repulsed the attacks of Clearidas, and did not finally give way until they were surrounded and routed by the missiles of the Myrcinian and Chalcidian horse and the targeteers.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

1 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.10.3, 1.21.1, 2.102.5, 3.36, 3.76.1, 3.81.5, 3.82, 3.83.1, 3.94.5, 4.24.5, 5.43, 5.65.3, 5.68.2, 6.2.1, 6.15, 6.17.5, 6.92, 7.29, 8.86 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.10.3. We have therefore no right to be skeptical, nor to content ourselves with an inspection of a town to the exclusion of a consideration of its power; but we may safely conclude that the armament in question surpassed all before it, as it fell short of modern efforts; if we can here also accept the testimony of Homer's poems, in which, without allowing for the exaggeration which a poet would feel himself licensed to employ, we can see that it was far from equalling ours. 1.21.1. On the whole, however, the conclusions I have drawn from the proofs quoted may, I believe, safely be relied on. Assuredly they will not be disturbed either by the lays of a poet displaying the exaggeration of his craft, or by the compositions of the chroniclers that are attractive at truth's expense; the subjects they treat of being out of the reach of evidence, and time having robbed most of them of historical value by enthroning them in the region of legend. Turning from these, we can rest satisfied with having proceeded upon the clearest data, and having arrived at conclusions as exact as can be expected in matters of such antiquity. 2.102.5. The islands in question are uninhabited and of no great size. There is also a story that Alcmaeon, son of Amphiaraus, during his wanderings after the murder of his mother was bidden by Apollo to inhabit this spot, through an oracle which intimated that he would have no release from his terrors until he should find a country to dwell in which had not been seen by the sun; or existed as land at the time he slew his mother; all else being to him polluted ground. 3.76.1. At this stage in the revolution, on the fourth or fifth day after the removal of the men to the island, the Peloponnesian ships arrived from Cyllene where they had been stationed since their return from Ionia, fifty-three in number, still under the command of Alcidas, but with Brasidas also on board as his adviser; and dropping anchor at Sybota, a harbor on the mainland, at daybreak made sail for Corcyra . 3.81.5. Death thus raged in every shape; and, as usually happens at such times, there was no length to which violence did not go; sons were killed by their fathers, and suppliants dragged from the altar or slain upon it; while some were even walled up in the temple of Dionysus and died there. 3.83.1. Thus every form of iniquity took root in the Hellenic countries by reason of the troubles. The ancient simplicity into which honor so largely entered was laughed down and disappeared; and society became divided into camps in which no man trusted his fellow. 3.94.5. The plan which they recommended was to attack first the Apodotians, next the Ophionians, and after these the Eurytanians, who are the largest tribe in Aetolia, and speak, as is said, a language exceedingly difficult to understand, and eat their flesh raw. These once subdued, the rest would easily come in. 4.24.5. The strait in question consists of the sea between Rhegium and Messina, at the point where Sicily approaches nearest to the continent, and is the Charybdis through which the story makes Ulysses sail; and the narrowness of the passage and the strength of the current that pours in from the vast Tyrrhenian and Sicilian mains, have rightly given it a bad reputation. 5.68.2. though as to putting down the numbers of either host, or of the contingents composing it, I could not do so with any accuracy. Owing to the secrecy of their government the number of the Lacedaemonians was not known, and men are so apt to brag about the forces of their country that the estimate of their opponents was not trusted. The following calculation, however, makes it possible to estimate the numbers of the Lacedaemonians present upon this occasion. 6.2.1. It was settled originally as follows, and the peoples that occupied it are these. The earliest inhabitants spoken of in any part of the country are the Cyclopes and Laestrygones; but I cannot tell of what race they were, or whence they came or whither they went, and must leave my readers to what the poets have said of them and to what may be generally known concerning them. 6.17.5. Moreover, the Siceliots have not so many heavy infantry as they boast; just as the Hellenes generally did not prove so numerous as each state reckoned itself, but Hellas greatly over-estimated their numbers, and has hardly had an adequate force of heavy infantry throughout this war.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
ability to handle good fortune Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
acanthus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 604
ainos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
alcibiades Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 244
brutality Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
chalcidians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
cleon Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
cowardice Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
epipolai Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 244
evaluative phrasing Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
hellespont Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
kyrrhos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
oath-breaking Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
olynthos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 604
oral tradition' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 244
piety Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
scione Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
scythians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
self-seeking Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
sermylia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 604
seuthes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
singos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 604
thucydides, son of melesias, archaeology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 244
thucydides, son of melesias, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
thucydides Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 211
xenophon, anabasis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614
xenophon, hellenica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 614