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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 4.81


nanBrasidas himself was sent out by the Lacedaemonians mainly at his own desire, although the Chalcidians also were eager to have a man so thorough as he had shown himself whenever there was anything to be done at Sparta, and whose after service abroad proved of the utmost use to his country. 2 At the present moment his just and moderate conduct towards the towns generally succeeded in procuring their revolt, besides the places which he managed to take by treachery; and thus when the Lacedaemonians desired to treat, as they ultimately did, they had places to offer in exchange, and the burden of war meanwhile shifted from Peloponnese. Later on in the war, after the events in Sicily, the present valour and conduct of Brasidas, known by experience to some, by hearsay to others, was what mainly created in the allies of Athens a feeling for the Lacedaemonians. 3 He was the first who went out and showed himself so good a man at all points as to leave behind him the conviction that the rest were like him.


nannan, Brasidas himself was sent out by the Lacedaemonians mainly at his own desire, although the Chalcidians also were eager to have a man so thorough as he had shown himself whenever there was anything to be done at Sparta, and whose after service abroad proved of the utmost use to his country. ,At the present moment his just and moderate conduct towards the towns generally succeeded in procuring their revolt, besides the places which he managed to take by treachery; and thus when the Lacedaemonians desired to treat, as they ultimately did, they had places to offer in exchange, and the burden of war meanwhile shifted from Peloponnese . Later on in the war, after the events in Sicily, the present valour and conduct of Brasidas, known by experience to some, by hearsay to others, was what mainly created in the allies of Athens a feeling for the Lacedaemonians. , He was the first who went out and showed himself so good a man at all points as to leave behind him the conviction that the rest were like him.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.443 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.443. /a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter
2. Gorgias, Helena, 17 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Herodotus, Histories, 1.5.3 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.5.3. These are the stories of the Persians and the Phoenicians. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike.
4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.2-1.19, 1.88-1.118, 1.126, 1.128-1.135, 1.139, 2.8.4, 2.65, 4.10, 4.40, 4.80, 4.84-4.89, 4.102, 4.106.1, 4.108, 4.121.1, 5.26, 6.2-6.5, 6.15.3-6.15.4, 6.54-6.59, 7.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.121.1. The Scionaeans were elated by his language, and even those who had at first disapproved of what was being done catching the general confidence, they determined on a vigorous conduct of the war, and welcomed Brasidas with all possible honours, publicly crowning him with a crown of gold as the liberator of Hellas ; while private persons crowded round him and decked him with garlands as though he had been an athlete. 6.15.3. For the position he held among the citizens led him to indulge his tastes beyond what his real means would bear, both in keeping horses and in the rest of his expenditure; and this later on had not a little to do with the ruin of the Athenian state. 6.15.4. Alarmed at the greatness of his license in his own life and habits, and of the ambition which he showed in all things soever that he undertook, the mass of the people set him down as a pretender to the tyranny, and became his enemies; and although publicly his conduct of the war was as good as could be desired individually, his habits gave offence to every one, and caused them to commit affairs to other hands, and thus before long to ruin the city.
5. Xenophon, Hellenica, 3.4.6, 3.4.11, 6.2.27, 6.2.32, 7.5.26-7.5.27 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.4.6. After this agreement had been reached, Tissaphernes made oath to the commissioners who were sent to him, Herippidas, Dercylidas, and Megillus, that in very truth and without guile he would negotiate the peace, and they in turn made oath on behalf of Agesilaus to Tissaphernes that in very truth, if he did this, Agesilaus would steadfastly observe the truce. Now Tissaphernes straightway violated the oaths which he had sworn; for instead of keeping peace he sent to the King for a large army in addition to that which he had before. But Agesilaus, though he was aware of this, nevertheless continued to abide by the truce. 3.4.11. Now when Tissaphernes, growing confident because of the army which had come down from the King, declared war upon Agesilaus if he did not depart from Asia, the allies and the Lacedaemonians who were present showed that they were greatly disturbed, thinking that the force which Agesilaus had was inferior to the King’s array; but Agesilaus, his countece radiant, ordered the ambassadors to carry back word to Tissaphernes that he felt very grateful to him because, by violating his oath, he had made the gods enemies of his side and allies of the Greeks. Then he straightway gave orders to the soldiers to pack up for a campaign, and sent word to the cities which had to be visited by anyone who marched upon Caria, that they should make ready a market. He also dispatched orders to the Ionians, Aeolians, and Hellespontines to send to him at Ephesus troops which should take part in the campaign. 6.2.27. As for Iphicrates, when he began his voyage around Peloponnesus he went on with all needful preparations for a naval battle as he sailed; for at the outset he had left his large sails behind him at Athens, since he expected to fight, and now, further, he made but slight use of his smaller sails, even if the wind was favourable; by making his voyage, then, with the oar, he kept his men in better condition of body and caused the ships to go faster. 6.2.32. Now I am aware that all these matters of practice and training are customary whenever men expect to engage in a battle by sea, but that which I commend in Iphicrates is this, that when it was incumbent upon him to arrive speedily at the place where he supposed he should fight with the enemy, he discovered a way to keep his men from being either, by reason of the voyage they had made, unskilled in the tactics of fighting at sea, or, by reason of their having been trained in such tactics, any the more tardy in arriving at their destination. 7.5.26. When these things had taken place, the opposite of what all men believed would happen was brought to pass. For since well-nigh all the people of Greece had come together and formed themselves in opposing lines, there was no one who did not suppose that if a battle were fought, those who proved victorious would be the rulers and those who were defeated would be their subjects; but the deity so ordered it that both parties set up a trophy as though victorious and neither tried to hinder those who set 362 B.C. them up, that both gave back the dead under a truce as though victorious, and both received back their dead under a truce as though defeated, and that while each party claimed to be victorious 7.5.27. neither was found to be any better off, as regards either additional territory, or city, or sway, than before the battle took place; but there was even more confusion and disorder in Greece after the battle than before. Thus far be it written by me; the events after these will perhaps be the concern of another.
6. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
"moralising, abstract or generalised" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
acanthus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
aetolia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 379
agesilaus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286, 287
alcidas Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 466
aristotle Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 97
arrabaeus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
athens Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93, 97
brasidas Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219; Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93, 94, 97
chalcidice, chalcidic peninsula, chalcidian cities (northern greece)nan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 379
cnemos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 466
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 295
corinth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290, 379
egypt Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
emotions Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 97
epos, epic poetry Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286, 287
fear Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93, 97
gorgias Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 97
herodotus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
homer/homeric Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 94
juxtaposition, as a means of moralising Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
lamachus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
leadership Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
narrative Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93, 97
oath-breaking Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
odrysians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
odysseus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 287
oxyrhynchus historian Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
pericles Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 94
piety Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
polemics Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
readers Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93, 94
scione Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 466
sicilian expedition Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 287
sicyon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
sitalkes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
speeches Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93
theopompus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
thessaly Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
thrace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290, 379, 466
thucydides, son of melesias, archaeology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286
thucydides, son of melesias, death Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 287
thucydides, son of melesias, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 290
thucydides, son of melesias, dramatic elements Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 379
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 286
thucydides Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219; Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 93, 94, 97
wit Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
xenophon Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 219
ēthos' Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 97