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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 2.97


nanThe empire of the Odrysians extended along the seaboard from Abdera to the mouth of the Danube in the Euxine. The navigation of this coast by the shortest route takes a merchantman four days and four nights with a wind astern the whole way: by land an active man, travelling by the shortest road, can get from Abdera to the Danube in eleven days. 2 Such was the length of its coast line. Inland from Byzantium to the Laeaeans and the Strymon, the farthest limit of its extension into the interior, it is a journey of thirteen days for an active man. 3 The tribute from all the barbarian districts and the Hellenic cities, taking what they brought in under Seuthes, the successor of Sitalces, who raised it to its greatest height, amounted to about four hundred talents in gold and silver. There were also presents in gold and silver to a no less amount, besides stuff, plain and embroidered, and other articles, made not only for the king, but also for the Odrysian lords and nobles. 4 For there was here established a custom opposite to that prevailing in the Persian kingdom, namely, of taking rather than giving; more disgrace being attached to not giving when asked than to asking and being refused; and although this prevailed elsewhere in Thrace, it was practised most extensively among the powerful Odrysians, it being impossible to get anything done without a present. 5 It was thus a very powerful kingdom; in revenue and general prosperity surpassing all in Europe between the Ionian Sea and the Euxine, and in numbers and military resources coming decidedly next to the Scythians, 6 with whom indeed no people in Europe can bear comparison, there not being even in Asia any nation singly a match for them if unanimous, though of course they are not on a level with other races in general intelligence and the arts of civilized life.


nannan, The empire of the Odrysians extended along the seaboard from Abdera to the mouth of the Danube in the Euxine. The navigation of this coast by the shortest route takes a merchantman four days and four nights with a wind astern the whole way: by land an active man, travelling by the shortest road, can get from Abdera to the Danube in eleven days. ,Such was the length of its coast line. Inland from Byzantium to the Laeaeans and the Strymon, the farthest limit of its extension into the interior, it is a journey of thirteen days for an active man. ,The tribute from all the barbarian districts and the Hellenic cities, taking what they brought in under Seuthes, the successor of Sitalces, who raised it to its greatest height, amounted to about four hundred talents in gold and silver. There were also presents in gold and silver to a no less amount, besides stuff, plain and embroidered, and other articles, made not only for the king, but also for the Odrysian lords and nobles. ,For there was here established a custom opposite to that prevailing in the Persian kingdom, namely, of taking rather than giving; more disgrace being attached to not giving when asked than to asking and being refused; and although this prevailed elsewhere in Thrace, it was practised most extensively among the powerful Odrysians, it being impossible to get anything done without a present. ,It was thus a very powerful kingdom; in revenue and general prosperity surpassing all in Europe between the Ionian gulf and the Euxine, and in numbers and military resources coming decidedly next to the Scythians, ,with whom indeed no people in Europe can bear comparison, there not being even in Asia any nation singly a match for them if unanimous, though of course they are not on a level with other races in general intelligence and the arts of civilized life.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 4.87, 6.134, 6.139-6.140 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.87. After having viewed the Pontus, Darius sailed back to the bridge, whose architect was Mandrocles of Samos; and when he had viewed the Bosporus also, he set up two pillars of white marble by it, engraving on the one in Assyrian and on the other in Greek characters the names of all the nations that were in his army: all the nations subject to him. The full census of these, over and above the fleet, was seven hundred thousand men, including horsemen, and the number of ships assembled was six hundred. ,These pillars were afterward carried by the Byzantines into their city and there used to build the altar of Orthosian Artemis, except for one column covered with Assyrian writing that was left beside the temple of Dionysus at Byzantium. Now if my reckoning is correct, the place where king Darius bridged the Bosporus was midway between Byzantium and the temple at the entrance of the sea. 6.134. All the Greeks tell the same story up to this point; after this the Parians themselves say that the following happened: as Miltiades was in a quandary, a captive woman named Timo, Parian by birth and an under-priestess of the goddesses of the dead, came to talk with him. ,Coming before Miltiades, she advised him, if taking Paros was very important to him, to do whatever she suggested. Then, following her advice, he passed through to the hill in front of the city and jumped over the fence of the precinct of Demeter the Lawgiver, since he was unable to open the door. After leaping over, he went to the shrine, whether to move something that should not be moved, or with some other intention. When he was right at the doors, he was immediately seized with panic and hurried back by the same route; leaping down from the wall he twisted his thigh, but some say he hit his knee. 6.139. But when the Pelasgians had murdered their own sons and women, their land brought forth no fruit, nor did their wives and their flocks and herds bear offspring as before. Crushed by hunger and childlessness, they sent to Delphi to ask for some release from their present ills. ,The Pythian priestess ordered them to pay the Athenians whatever penalty the Athenians themselves judged. The Pelasgians went to Athens and offered to pay the penalty for all their wrongdoing. ,The Athenians set in their town-hall a couch adorned as finely as possible, and placed beside it a table covered with all manner of good things, then ordered the Pelasgians to deliver their land to them in the same condition. ,The Pelasgians answered, “We will deliver it when a ship with a north wind accomplishes the voyage from your country to ours in one day”; they supposed that this was impossible, since Attica is far to the south of Lemnos. 6.140. At the time that was all. But a great many years later, when the Chersonese on the Hellespont was made subject to Athens, Miltiades son of Cimon accomplished the voyage from Elaeus on the Chersonese to Lemnos with the Etesian winds then constantly blowing; he proclaimed that the Pelasgians must leave their island, reminding them of the oracle which the Pelasgians thought would never be fulfilled. ,The Hephaestians obeyed, but the Myrinaeans would not agree that the Chersonese was Attica and were besieged, until they too submitted. Thus did Miltiades and the Athenians take possession of Lemnos.
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.22.1-1.22.3, 1.23.1, 1.24.1, 1.77, 1.89-1.118, 1.97.2, 1.129.3, 1.130, 2.15, 2.29.3, 2.40, 2.67-2.68, 3.104, 4.50.1, 6.54-6.59, 6.76.3, 6.82.3, 8.53.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.22.1. With reference to the speeches in this history, some were delivered before the war began, others while it was going on; some I heard myself, others I got from various quarters; it was in all cases difficult to carry them word for word in one's memory, so my habit has been to make the speakers say what was in my opinion demanded of them by the various occasions, of course adhering as closely as possible to the general sense of what they really said. 1.22.2. And with reference to the narrative of events, far from permitting myself to derive it from the first source that came to hand, I did not even trust my own impressions, but it rests partly on what I saw myself, partly on what others saw for me, the accuracy of the report being always tried by the most severe and detailed tests possible. 1.22.3. My conclusions have cost me some labour from the want of coincidence between accounts of the same occurrences by different eye-witnesses, arising sometimes from imperfect memory, sometimes from undue partiality for one side or the other. 1.23.1. The Median war, the greatest achievement of past times, yet found a speedy decision in two actions by sea and two by land. The Peloponnesian war was prolonged to an immense length, and long as it was it was short without parallel for the misfortunes that it brought upon Hellas . 1.24.1. The city of Epidamnus stands on the right of the entrance of the Ionic gulf. Its vicinity is inhabited by the Taulantians, an Illyrian people. 1.97.2. My excuse for relating these events, and for venturing on this digression, is that this passage of history has been omitted by all my predecessors, who have confined themselves either to Hellenic history before the Median war, or to the Median war itself. Hellanicus, it is true, did touch on these events in his Athenian history; but he is somewhat concise and not accurate in his dates. Besides, the history of these events contains an explanation of the growth of the Athenian empire. 1.129.3. which contained the following answer:—‘Thus saith King Xerxes to Pausanias. For the men whom you have saved for me across sea from Byzantium, an obligation is laid up for you in our house, recorded forever; and with your proposals I am well pleased. Let neither night nor day stop you from diligently performing any of your promises to me, neither for cost of gold nor of silver let them be hindered, nor yet for number of troops, wherever it may be that their presence is needed; but with Artabazus, an honorable man whom I send you, boldly advance my objects and yours, as may be most for the honor and interest of us both.’ 2.29.3. This Teres is in no way related to Tereus who married Pandion's daughter Procne from Athens ; nor indeed did they belong to the same part of Thrace . Tereus lived in Daulis, part of what is now called Phocis, but which at that time was inhabited by Thracians. It was in this land that the women perpetrated the outrage upon Itys; and many of the poets when they mention the nightingale call it the Daulian bird. Besides, Pandion in contracting an alliance for his daughter would consider the advantages of mutual assistance, and would naturally prefer a match at the above moderate distance to the journey of many days which separates Athens from the Odrysians. Again the names are different; and this Teres was king of the Odrysians, the first by the way who attained to any power. 6.76.3. No; but the same policy which has proved so successful in Hellas is now being tried in Sicily . After being chosen as the leaders of the Ionians and of the other allies of Athenian origin, to punish the Mede, the Athenians accused some of failure in military service, some of fighting against each other, and others, as the case might be, upon any colourable pretext that could be found, until they thus subdued them all. 6.82.3. After the Median war we had a fleet, and so got rid of the empire and supremacy of the Lacedaemonians, who had no right to give orders to us more than we to them, except that of being the strongest at that moment; and being appointed leaders of the king's former subjects, we continue to be so, thinking that we are least likely to fall under the dominion of the Peloponnesians, if we have a force to defend ourselves with, and in strict truth having done nothing unfair in reducing to subjection the Ionians and islanders, the kinsfolk whom the Syracusans say we have enslaved. 8.53.3. Upon their replying that they had not, he then plainly said to them: ‘This we cannot have unless we have a more moderate form of government, and put the offices into fewer hands, and so gain the king's confidence, and forthwith restore Alcibiades, who is the only man living that can bring this about. The safety of the state, not the form of its government, is for the moment the most pressing question, as we can always change afterwards whatever we do not like.'
3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.603, 1.839-1.841, 4.1537-4.1548, 4.1551-4.1553 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.603. ὅσσον ἐς ἔνδιόν κεν ἐύστολος ὁλκὰς ἀνύσσαι 1.839. ἐξείπω κατὰ κόσμον. ἀνακτορίη δὲ μελέσθω 1.840. σοίγʼ αὐτῇ καὶ νῆσος· ἔγωγε μὲν οὐκ ἀθερίζων 1.841. χάζομαι, ἀλλά με λυγροὶ ἐπισπέρχουσιν ἄεθλοι.’ 4.1537. ἀλλʼ ὅτε δή ῥʼ ἐπὶ νηὸς ἔβαν, πρήσοντος ἀήτεω 4.1538. ἂμ πέλαγος νοτίοιο, πόρους τʼ ἀπετεκμήραντο 4.1539. λίμνης ἐκπρομολεῖν Τριτωνίδος, οὔτινα μῆτιν 4.1540. δὴν ἔχον, ἀφραδέως δὲ πανημέριοι φορέοντο. 4.1541. ὡς δὲ δράκων σκολιὴν εἱλιγμένος ἔρχεται οἶμον 4.1542. εὖτέ μιν ὀξύτατον θάλπει σέλας ἠελίοιο· 4.1543. ῥοίζῳ δʼ ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα κάρη στρέφει, ἐν δέ οἱ ὄσσε 4.1544. σπινθαρύγεσσι πυρὸς ἐναλίγκια μαιμώοντι 4.1545. λάμπεται, ὄφρα μυχόνδε διὰ ῥωχμοῖο δύηται· 4.1546. ὧς Ἀργὼ λίμνης στόμα ναύπορον ἐξερέουσα 4.1547. ἀμφεπόλει δηναιὸν ἐπὶ χρόνον. αὐτίκα δʼ Ὀρφεὺς 4.1548. κέκλετʼ Ἀπόλλωνος τρίποδα μέγαν ἔκτοθι νηὸς 4.1551. τοῖσιν δʼ αἰζηῷ ἐναλίγκιος ἀντεβόλησεν 4.1552. τρίτων εὐρυβίης, γαίης δʼ ἀνὰ βῶλον ἀείρας 4.1553. ξείνιʼ ἀριστήεσσι προΐσχετο, φώνησέν τε·
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.69.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.69.7.  Now as for the stories invented by Herodotus and certain writers on Egyptian affairs, who deliberately preferred to the truth the telling of marvellous tales and the invention of myths for the delectation of their readers, these we shall omit, and we shall set forth only what appears in the written records of the priests of Egypt and has passed our careful scrutiny.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acusilaus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666
alternative versions Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
antioch Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
apollo Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
artaphernes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666
asia minor Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
assyrian writing Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
berossus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
black sea, metal trade Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
black sea Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
bosporus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
byzantium Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
colchis, colchians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
constantine Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
egypt, egyptians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
ethnography Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32, 33
europe Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
fowler, r. Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32, 33
greeks, and scythia Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
greeks, and thrace Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
hebros Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
hecataeus, of abdera Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
hecataeus, of miletus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
hellanicus, atthis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
hellanicus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
herodotus, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
herodotus, proem Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
herodotus, sources Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
herodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666
ister, river Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
jason Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
lateiner, d. Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
lemnos, lemnians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
libya, libyans Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
lydia, lydians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
magic Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
marincola, j. Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
maritsa Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
medea Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
menelaus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
metal trade, between black sea andgreece Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
metalwork, produced in black sea Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
metalwork, traded there Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
miltiades Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
modello-codice, herodotus as Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32, 33
modello-codice, homer as Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
modello-codice Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
modello-esemplare, herodotus as Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
mopsus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
nile, river Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
nomoi Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
non-greeks Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
odrysians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
odyssey, homers Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
oligarchic conspiracy/revolution (nan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666
orpheus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
persia, persians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
pherecydes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
pindar Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
pisander Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666
polybius Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
pontus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 25
sadokos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
scythia, and greeks Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
scythia, scythians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
sitalkes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51, 612
sources, historiographical approach to Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
thrace, and greeks Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
thrace, thracians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32
thucydides, son of melesias, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
thucydides, son of melesias, documents, letters, treaties etc. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
thucydides Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 32, 33, 136
timaeus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 33
tribute, as form of trade, in black sea Parkins and Smith, Trade, Traders and the Ancient City (1998) 66
tripod, offered by argonauts' Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
triton Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
tritonis, lake Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 136
xerxes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 666