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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 2.60.5


καίτοι ἐμοὶ τοιούτῳ ἀνδρὶ ὀργίζεσθε ὃς οὐδενὸς ἥσσων οἴομαι εἶναι γνῶναί τε τὰ δέοντα καὶ ἑρμηνεῦσαι ταῦτα, φιλόπολίς τε καὶ χρημάτων κρείσσων.And yet if you are angry with me, it is with one who, as I believe, is second to no man either in knowledge of the proper policy, or in the ability to expound it, and who is moreover not only a patriot but an honest one.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.70, 1.73, 1.92, 1.263, 1.265-1.273, 1.277-1.281, 9.434-9.435, 9.437, 9.440-9.443 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.70. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.73. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.92. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.263. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.265. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.266. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.267. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.268. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.269. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.270. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.271. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.272. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.273. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.277. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.278. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.279. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.280. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.281. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 9.434. /So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence, marveling at his words; for with exceeding vehemence did he deny them. But at length there spake among them the old horseman Phoenix, bursting into tears, for that greatly did he fear for the ships of the Achaeans:If verily thou layest up in thy mind, glorious Achilles 9.435. /the purpose of returning, neither art minded at all to ward from the swift ships consuming fire, for that wrath hath fallen upon thy heart; how can I then, dear child, be left here without thee, alone? It was to thee that the old horseman Peleus sent me on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon, forth from Phthia 9.437. /the purpose of returning, neither art minded at all to ward from the swift ships consuming fire, for that wrath hath fallen upon thy heart; how can I then, dear child, be left here without thee, alone? It was to thee that the old horseman Peleus sent me on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon, forth from Phthia 9.440. /a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.441. /a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.442. /a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.443. /a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter
2. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1081 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1081. κἀκεῖνος ὡς ἥττων ἔρωτός ἐστι καὶ γυναικῶν:
3. Euripides, Andromache, 630-631, 629 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

629. ἀλλ', ὡς ἐσεῖδες μαστόν, ἐκβαλὼν ξίφος
4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.114.1, 1.127.1, 1.138.3, 1.139.4, 1.140.1, 2.21.3, 2.22.1, 2.34.6, 2.34.8, 2.37.1, 2.38.1-2.38.2, 2.39-2.40, 2.40.1, 2.44-2.45, 2.48.3, 2.59.1, 2.59.3, 2.60-2.64, 2.60.1, 2.61.3, 2.64.1, 2.65.1, 2.65.3, 2.65.8-2.65.10, 3.45.4-3.45.5, 3.82.8, 3.87, 6.15.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.114.1. This was soon afterwards followed by the revolt of Euboea from Athens . Pericles had already crossed over with an army of Athenians to the island, when news was brought to him that Megara had revolted, that the Peloponnesians were on the point of invading Attica, and that the Athenian garrison had been cut off by the Megarians, with the exception of a few who had taken refuge in Nisaea . The Megarians had introduced the Corinthians, Sicyonians, and Epidaurians into the town before they revolted. Meanwhile Pericles brought his army back in all haste from Euboea . 1.138.3. For Themistocles was a man who exhibited the most indubitable signs of genius; indeed, in this particular he has a claim on our admiration quite extraordinary and unparalleled. By his own native capacity, alike unformed and unsupplemented by study, he was at once the best judge in those sudden crises which admit of little or of no deliberation, and the best prophet of the future, even to its most distant possibilities. An able theoretical expositor of all that came within the sphere of his practice, he was not without the power of passing an adequate judgment in matters in which he had no experience. He could also excellently divine the good and evil which lay hid in the unseen future. In fine, whether we consider the extent of his natural powers, or the slightness of his application, this extraordinary man must be allowed to have surpassed all others in the faculty of intuitively meeting an emergency. 1.139.4. There were many speakers who came forward and gave their support to one side or the other, urging the necessity of war, or the revocation of the decree and the folly of allowing it to stand in the way of peace. Among them came forward Pericles, son of Xanthippus, the first man of his time at Athens, ablest alike in counsel and in action, and gave the following advice:— 1.140.1. ‘There is one principle, Athenians, which I hold to through everything, and that is the principle of no concession to the Peloponnesians. I know that the spirit which inspires men while they are being persuaded to make war, is not always retained in action; that as circumstances change, resolutions change. Yet I see that now as before the same, almost literally the same, counsel is demanded of me; and I put it to those of you, who are allowing yourselves to be persuaded, to support the national resolves even in the case of reverses, or to forfeit all credit for their wisdom in the event of success. For sometimes the course of things is as arbitrary as the plans of man; indeed this is why we usually blame chance for whatever does not happen as we expected. 2.21.3. Knots were formed in the streets and engaged in hot discussion; for if the proposed sally was warmly recommended, it was also in some cases opposed. Oracles of the most various import were recited by the collectors, and found eager listeners in one or other of the disputants. Foremost in pressing for the sally were the Acharnians, as constituting no small part of the army of the state, and as it was their land that was being ravaged. In short, the whole city was in a most excited state; Pericles was the object of general indignation; his previous counsels were totally forgotten; he was abused for not leading out the army which he commanded, and was made responsible for the whole of the public suffering. 2.22.1. He, meanwhile, seeing anger and infatuation just now in the ascendant, and confident of his wisdom in refusing a sally, would not call either assembly or meeting of the people, fearing the fatal results of a debate inspired by passion and not by prudence. Accordingly, he addressed himself to the defence of the city, and kept it as quiet as possible 2.34.6. After the bodies have been laid in the earth, a man chosen by the state, of approved wisdom and eminent reputation, pronounces over them an appropriate panegyric; after which all retire. 2.34.8. Meanwhile these were the first that had fallen, and Pericles, son of Xanthippus, was chosen to pronounce their eulogium. When the proper time arrived, he advanced from the sepulchre to an elevated platform in order to be heard by as many of the crowd as possible, and spoke as follows: 2.37.1. Our constitution does not copy the laws of neighboring states; we are rather a pattern to others than imitators ourselves. Its administration favors the many instead of the few; this is why it is called a democracy. If we look to the laws, they afford equal justice to all in their private differences; if to social standing, advancement in public life falls to reputation for capacity, class considerations not being allowed to interfere with merit; nor again does poverty bar the way, if a man is able to serve the state, he is not hindered by the obscurity of his condition. 2.38.1. Further, we provide plenty of means for the mind to refresh itself from business. We celebrate games and sacrifices all the year round, and the elegance of our private establishments forms a daily source of pleasure and helps to banish the spleen; 2.38.2. while the magnitude of our city draws the produce of the world into our harbor, so that to the Athenian the fruits of other countries are as familiar a luxury as those of his own. 2.40.1. We cultivate refinement without extravagance and knowledge without effeminacy; wealth we employ more for use than for show, and place the real disgrace of poverty not in owning to the fact but in declining the struggle against it. 2.48.3. All speculation as to its origin and its causes, if causes can be found adequate to produce so great a disturbance, I leave to other writers, whether lay or professional; for myself, I shall simply set down its nature, and explain the symptoms by which perhaps it may be recognized by the student, if it should ever break out again. This I can the better do, as I had the disease myself, and watched its operation in the case of others. 2.59.1. After the second invasion of the Peloponnesians a change came over the spirit of the Athenians. Their land had now been twice laid waste; and war and pestilence at once pressed heavy upon them. 2.59.3. When he saw them exasperated at the present turn of affairs and acting exactly as he had anticipated, he called an assembly, being (it must be remembered) still general, with the double object of restoring confidence and of leading them from these angry feelings to a calmer and more hopeful state of mind. He accordingly came forward and spoke as follows: 2.60.1. ‘I was not unprepared for the indignation of which I have been the object, as I know its causes; and I have called an assembly for the purpose of reminding you upon certain points, and of protesting against your being unreasonably irritated with me, or cowed by your sufferings. 2.61.3. For before what is sudden, unexpected, and least within calculation the spirit quails; and putting all else aside, the plague has certainly been an emergency of this kind. 2.64.1. But you must not be seduced by citizens like these nor be angry with me,—who, if I voted for war, only did as you did yourselves,—in spite of the enemy having invaded your country and done what you could be certain that he would do, if you refused to comply with his demands; and although besides what we counted for, the plague has come upon us—the only point indeed at which our calculation has been at fault. It is this, I know, that has had a large share in making me more unpopular than I should otherwise have been,—quite undeservedly, unless you are also prepared to give me the credit of any success with which chance may present you. 2.65.1. Such were the arguments by which Pericles tried to cure the Athenians of their anger against him and to divert their thoughts from their immediate afflictions. 2.65.3. In fact, the public feeling against him did not subside until he had been fined. 2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen. 2.65.10. With his successors it was different. More on a level with one another, and each grasping at supremacy, they ended by committing even the conduct of state affairs to the whims of the multitude. 3.45.4. Either then some means of terror more terrible than this must be discovered, or it must be owned that this restraint is useless; and that as long as poverty gives men the courage of necessity, or plenty fills them with the ambition which belongs to insolence and pride, and the other conditions of life remain each under the thraldom of some fatal and master passion, so long will the impulse never be wanting to drive men into danger. 3.45.5. Hope also and cupidity, the one leading and the other following, the one conceiving the attempt, the other suggesting the facility of succeeding, cause the widest ruin, and, although invisible agents, are far stronger than the dangers that are seen. 3.82.8. The cause of all these evils was the lust for power arising from greed and ambition; and from these passions proceeded the violence of parties once engaged in contention. The leaders in the cities, each provided with the fairest professions, on the one side with the cry of political equality of the people, on the other of a moderate aristocracy, sought prizes for themselves in those public interests which they pretended to cherish, and, recoiling from no means in their struggles for ascendancy, engaged in the direct excesses; in their acts of vengeance they went to even greater lengths, not stopping at what justice or the good of the state demanded, but making the party caprice of the moment their only standard, and invoking with equal readiness the condemnation of an unjust verdict or the authority of the strong arm to glut the animosities of the hour. Thus religion was in honor with neither party; but the use of fair phrases to arrive at guilty ends was in high reputation. Meanwhile the moderate part of the citizens perished between the two, either for not joining in the quarrel, or because envy would not suffer them to escape. 6.15.2. By far the warmest advocate of the expedition was, however, Alcibiades, son of Clinias, who wished to thwart Nicias both as his political opponent and also because of the attack he had made upon him in his speech, and who was, besides, exceedingly ambitious of a command by which he hoped to reduce Sicily and Carthage, and personally to gain in wealth and reputation by means of his successes.
5. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Demosthenes, Orations, 20.141 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.55 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.55. So far Pisistratus. To return to Solon: one of his sayings is that 70 years are the term of man's life.He seems to have enacted some admirable laws; for instance, if any man neglects to provide for his parents, he shall be disfranchised; moreover there is a similar penalty for the spendthrift who runs through his patrimony. Again, not to have a settled occupation is made a crime for which any one may, if he pleases, impeach the offender. Lysias, however, in his speech against Nicias ascribes this law to Draco, and to Solon another depriving open profligates of the right to speak in the Assembly. He curtailed the honours of athletes who took part in the games, fixing the allowance for an Olympic victor at 500 drachmae, for an Isthmian victor at 100 drachmae, and proportionately in all other cases. It was in bad taste, he urged, to increase the rewards of these victors, and to ignore the exclusive claims of those who had fallen in battle, whose sons ought, moreover, to be maintained and educated by the State.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, as subjects Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, circumstances / conditions / states of affairs stressed by Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 282
alcmeonids Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 533
ananke Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 186
anonymus iamblichi, money and wealth in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 280
appropriate (suitable), emotion Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 540
athens and athenians, exposed to forces beyond their control Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
avarice Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 294
causation in thucydides, and idea of contest Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279
chronology (development), of aristotles thought Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 405
citizens virtue in relation to office and constitution Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 294
cleon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 440
comedy, old comedy' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 440
constitutions Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 294, 328
definition, of emotion Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
deliberation, means-end deliberation Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 294
deliberative oratory Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 327, 328
desire, for more (πλεονεξία) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279
emotion, strong and weak emotions Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
emotion Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
emotional appeal Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
enargeia Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 186
epiphany Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 186
fear, pericles confronted with Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
friend of the city Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 287, 294, 327, 328, 405
friendly feelings, emotion of friendship Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
goodwill (wishing well), an emotion Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
hate Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
herodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 151
individuals, withstanding necessity Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279, 282
irrational impulses, athenians beset by Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279, 282
liturgy/liturgist Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 186
locke, john Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 280
money, anonymus iamblichi on Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 280
moral virtue Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 294
mycalessus, and compounds of πίπτω Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
pain, involvement in emotion Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75
peloponnesian war, as attacker Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
periautologia Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 186
pericles, and balance Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 282
pericles, and stronger Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279
pericles, prevailing over irrationality Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279, 282
pericles Spatharas, Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens (2019) 186
persuasion through character Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 75, 287, 294, 327, 328, 405
piraeus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 533
plague, and compounds of πίπτω Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
plutarch Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 440
practical wisdom Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 294
present things / circumstances (τὰ παρόντα, τὰ ὑπάρχοντα, τὰ πράγματα etc.) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 282
proof, demonstration Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 287, 294
solon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 540
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 540
thucydides, son of melesias, language Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 533
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 533
tragic perspective of thucydides Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
tuchē (chance, luck, fortune) Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 280
uprightness Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 327
useful (advantageous, beneficial) Fortenbaugh, Aristotle's Practical Side: On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric (2006) 294
wealth, anonymus iamblichi on Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 280
γνώμη (and γιγνώσκω), championed by pericles Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 282
γνώμη (and γιγνώσκω), meaning of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 282
γνώμη (and γιγνώσκω), vs. passion Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 282
κρείσσων (stronger), passions as Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279
ἔρως, and sicilian expedition Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 275
ἔρως, diodotus on Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279
ἵστημι, compounds of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 279
ὀργή and ὀργίζομαι Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 282