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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 2.29.3


Τηρεῖ δὲ τῷ Πρόκνην τὴν Πανδίονος ἀπ’ Ἀθηνῶν σχόντι γυναῖκα προσήκει ὁ Τήρης οὗτος οὐδέν, οὐδὲ τῆς αὐτῆς Θρᾴκης ἐγένοντο, ἀλλ’ ὁ μὲν ἐν Δαυλίᾳ τῆς Φωκίδος νῦν καλουμένης γῆς [ὁ Τηρεὺς ] ᾤκει, τότε ὑπὸ Θρᾳκῶν οἰκουμένης, καὶ τὸ ἔργον τὸ περὶ τὸν Ἴτυν αἱ γυναῖκες ἐν τῇ γῇ ταύτῃ ἔπραξαν ʽπολλοῖς δὲ καὶ τῶν ποιητῶν ἐν ἀηδόνος μνήμῃ Δαυλιὰς ἡ ὄρνις ἐπωνόμασταἰ, εἰκός τε καὶ τὸ κῆδος Πανδίονα ξυνάψασθαι τῆς θυγατρὸς διὰ τοσούτου ἐπ’ ὠφελίᾳ τῇ πρὸς ἀλλήλους μᾶλλον ἢ διὰ πολλῶν ἡμερῶν ἐς Ὀδρύσας ὁδοῦ. Τήρης δὲ οὐδὲ τὸ αὐτὸ ὄνομα ἔχων βασιλεύς [τε] πρῶτος ἐν κράτει Ὀδρυσῶν ἐγένετο.This Teres is in no way related to Tereus who married Pandion's daughter Procne from Athens ; nor indeed did they belong to the same part of Thrace . Tereus lived in Daulis, part of what is now called Phocis, but which at that time was inhabited by Thracians. It was in this land that the women perpetrated the outrage upon Itys; and many of the poets when they mention the nightingale call it the Daulian bird. Besides, Pandion in contracting an alliance for his daughter would consider the advantages of mutual assistance, and would naturally prefer a match at the above moderate distance to the journey of many days which separates Athens from the Odrysians. Again the names are different; and this Teres was king of the Odrysians, the first by the way who attained to any power.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 566 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

566. Him pastures but rotate around the land
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.22.1-1.22.3, 1.23.1, 1.24.1, 1.89-1.118, 1.97.2, 2.15, 2.68, 2.97, 3.104 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.22.1. With reference to the speeches in this history, some were delivered before the war began, others while it was going on; some I heard myself, others I got from various quarters; it was in all cases difficult to carry them word for word in one's memory, so my habit has been to make the speakers say what was in my opinion demanded of them by the various occasions, of course adhering as closely as possible to the general sense of what they really said. 1.22.2. And with reference to the narrative of events, far from permitting myself to derive it from the first source that came to hand, I did not even trust my own impressions, but it rests partly on what I saw myself, partly on what others saw for me, the accuracy of the report being always tried by the most severe and detailed tests possible. 1.22.3. My conclusions have cost me some labour from the want of coincidence between accounts of the same occurrences by different eye-witnesses, arising sometimes from imperfect memory, sometimes from undue partiality for one side or the other. 1.23.1. The Median war, the greatest achievement of past times, yet found a speedy decision in two actions by sea and two by land. The Peloponnesian war was prolonged to an immense length, and long as it was it was short without parallel for the misfortunes that it brought upon Hellas . 1.24.1. The city of Epidamnus stands on the right of the entrance of the Ionic gulf. Its vicinity is inhabited by the Taulantians, an Illyrian people. 1.97.2. My excuse for relating these events, and for venturing on this digression, is that this passage of history has been omitted by all my predecessors, who have confined themselves either to Hellenic history before the Median war, or to the Median war itself. Hellanicus, it is true, did touch on these events in his Athenian history; but he is somewhat concise and not accurate in his dates. Besides, the history of these events contains an explanation of the growth of the Athenian empire.
3. Papyri, P.Oxy., 3013



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
athens, and procne myth Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
athens, politicisation of myth Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
cannibalism Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
euripides, innovation Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
hebros Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
hellanicus, atthis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
hellanicus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
herodotus, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
herodotus, proem Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
herodotus, sources Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51
infanticide myths Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
maritsa Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
myth, innovative treatment of Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
nightingale, myth of, in sophocles tereus Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
odrysians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
politicisation of myth Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
procne, myth of, and athens Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
procne, myth of, in sophocles tereus Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
sadokos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
sitalkes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 51, 612
sophocles, innovations in myth Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
sophocles, tereus Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
swinburne, algernon charles, itylus Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
theatre, political function Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
thucydides, son of melesias, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
thucydides, son of melesias, exile' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 612
tragedy, infanticide myths Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137
treatment of myth Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 137