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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 1.75.4


καὶ οὐκ ἀσφαλὲς ἔτι ἐδόκει εἶναι τοῖς πολλοῖς ἀπηχθημένους, καί τινων καὶ ἤδη ἀποστάντων κατεστραμμένων, ὑμῶν τε ἡμῖν οὐκέτι ὁμοίως φίλων, ἀλλ’ ὑπόπτων καὶ διαφόρων ὄντων, ἀνέντας κινδυνεύειν: καὶ γὰρ ἂν αἱ ἀποστάσεις πρὸς ὑμᾶς ἐγίγνοντο.And at last, when almost all hated us, when some had already revolted and had been subdued, when you had ceased to be the friends that you once were, and had become objects of suspicion and dislike, it appeared no longer safe to give up our empire; especially as all who left us would fall to you.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.17, 1.23.4, 1.70.3, 1.73-1.74, 1.76.1-1.76.2, 1.124, 1.139.1, 2.2.1, 2.39-2.40, 2.63.2, 3.37.2, 3.81.5, 3.82.8, 3.83.1, 6.85.1, 7.18.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.23.4. which was begun by the Athenians and Peloponnesians by the dissolution of the thirty years' truce made after the conquest of Euboea . 1.70.3. Again, they are adventurous beyond their power, and daring beyond their judgment, and in danger they are sanguine; your wont is to attempt less than is justified by your power, to mistrust even what is sanctioned by your judgment, and to fancy that from danger there is no release. 1.76.1. You, at all events, Lacedaemonians, have used your supremacy to settle the states in Peloponnese as is agreeable to you. And if at the period of which we were speaking you had persevered to the end of the matter, and had incurred hatred in your command, we are sure that you would have made yourselves just as galling to the allies, and would have been forced to choose between a strong government and danger to yourselves. 1.76.2. It follows that it was not a very wonderful action, or contrary to the common practice of mankind, if we did accept an empire that was offered to us, and refused to give it up under the pressure of three of the strongest motives, fear, honor, and interest. And it was not we who set the example, for it has always been the law that the weaker should be subject to the stronger. Besides, we believed ourselves to be worthy of our position, and so you thought us till now, when calculations of interest have made you take up the cry of justice—a consideration which no one ever yet brought forward to hinder his ambition when he had a chance of gaining anything by might. 1.139.1. To return to the Lacedaemonians. The history of their first embassy, the injunctions which it conveyed, and the rejoinder which it provoked, concerning the expulsion of the accursed persons, have been related already. It was followed by a second, which ordered Athens to raise the siege of Potidaea, and to respect the independence of Aegina . Above all, it gave her most distinctly to understand that war might be prevented by the revocation of the Megara decree, excluding the Megarians from the use of Athenian harbors and of the market of Athens . 2.2.1. The thirty years' truce which was entered into after the conquest of Euboea lasted fourteen years. In the fifteenth, in the forty-eighth year of the priestess-ship of Chrysis at Argos, in the Ephorate of Aenesias at Sparta, in the last month but two of the Archonship of Pythodorus at Athens, and six months after the battle of Potidaea, just at the beginning of spring, a Theban force a little over three hundred strong, under the command of their Boeotarchs, Pythangelus, son of Phyleides, and Diemporus, son of Onetorides, about the first watch of the night, made an armed entry into Plataea, a town of Boeotia in alliance with Athens . 2.63.2. Besides, to recede is no longer possible, if indeed any of you in the alarm of the moment has become enamored of the honesty of such an unambitious part. For what you hold is, to speak somewhat plainly, a tyranny; to take it perhaps was wrong, but to let it go is unsafe. 3.81.5. Death thus raged in every shape; and, as usually happens at such times, there was no length to which violence did not go; sons were killed by their fathers, and suppliants dragged from the altar or slain upon it; while some were even walled up in the temple of Dionysus and died there. 3.82.8. The cause of all these evils was the lust for power arising from greed and ambition; and from these passions proceeded the violence of parties once engaged in contention. The leaders in the cities, each provided with the fairest professions, on the one side with the cry of political equality of the people, on the other of a moderate aristocracy, sought prizes for themselves in those public interests which they pretended to cherish, and, recoiling from no means in their struggles for ascendancy, engaged in the direct excesses; in their acts of vengeance they went to even greater lengths, not stopping at what justice or the good of the state demanded, but making the party caprice of the moment their only standard, and invoking with equal readiness the condemnation of an unjust verdict or the authority of the strong arm to glut the animosities of the hour. Thus religion was in honor with neither party; but the use of fair phrases to arrive at guilty ends was in high reputation. Meanwhile the moderate part of the citizens perished between the two, either for not joining in the quarrel, or because envy would not suffer them to escape. 3.83.1. Thus every form of iniquity took root in the Hellenic countries by reason of the troubles. The ancient simplicity into which honor so largely entered was laughed down and disappeared; and society became divided into camps in which no man trusted his fellow. 7.18.2. But the Lacedaemonians derived most encouragement from the belief that Athens, with two wars on her hands, against themselves and against the Siceliots, would be more easy to subdue, and from the conviction that she had been the first to infringe the truce. In the former war, they considered, the offence had been more on their own side, both on account of the entrance of the Thebans into Plataea in time of peace, and also of their own refusal to listen to the Athenian offer of arbitration, in spite of the clause in the former treaty that where arbitration should be offered there should be no appeal to arms. For this reason they thought that they deserved their misfortunes, and took to heart seriously the disaster at Pylos and whatever else had befallen them.
2. Plutarch, Pericles, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30.1. They say that when an embassy had come from Lacedaemon to Athens to treat of these matters, and Pericles was shielding himself behind the plea that a certain law prevented his taking down the tablet on which the decree was inscribed, Polyalces, one of the ambassadors, cried: Well then, don’t take it down, but turn the tablet to the wall; surely there’s no law preventing that. Clever as the proposal was, however, not one whit the more did Pericles give in.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, and perfect forms with static implications Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, and personification Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, circumstances / conditions / states of affairs stressed by Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
athenians at sparta (speech of), and depersonalizing style Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
athenians at sparta (speech of), and greatest things (fear, honour, and advantage) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90, 127
athenians at sparta (speech of), on necessity of athenian empire Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
cleon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 271
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 476
corinth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 475
desire, for more (πλεονεξία) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 127
diodotus, on human nature Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 127
herodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 475
inner vs. outer, distinction of…collapsed Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 127
irrational impulses, and human nature Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 127
mardonios Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 475
necessity (in thucydides), and circumstances / material conditions / states of affairs Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 127
necessity (in thucydides), and processes Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
necessity (in thucydides), hard vs. practical Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
necessity (in thucydides), impersonal element in Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
necessity (in thucydides), of athenian empire Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
plague' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 484
plutarch Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 476
quest for power, as bare fact Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 127
quest for power, as necessity Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90, 127
thirty years peace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 476
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 476
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 271
xerxes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 475
νικάω Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
πάθος, πάθημα, and παθητικός, definition of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 127
ἵστημι, compounds of, and κατάστασις Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90
ἵστημι, compounds of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 90