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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 1.70-1.71


nanBesides, we consider that we have as good a right as any one to point out a neighbor's faults, particularly when we contemplate the great contrast between the two national characters; a contrast of which, as far as we can see, you have little perception, having never yet considered what sort of antagonists you will encounter in the Athenians, how widely, how absolutely different from yourselves. 2 The Athenians are addicted to innovation, and their designs are characterized by swiftness alike in conception and execution; you have a genius for keeping what you have got, accompanied by a total want of invention, and when forced to act you never go far enough. 3 Again, they are adventurous beyond their power, and daring beyond their judgment, and in danger they are sanguine; your wont is to attempt less than is justified by your power, to mistrust even what is sanctioned by your judgment, and to fancy that from danger there is no release. 4 Further, there is promptitude on their side against procrastination on yours; they are never at home, you are never from it: for they hope by their absence to extend their acquisitions, you fear by your advance to endanger what you have left behind. 5 They are swift to follow up a success, and slow to recoil from a reverse. 6 Their bodies they spend ungrudgingly in their country's cause; their intellect they jealously husband to be employed in her service. 7 A scheme unexecuted is with them a positive loss, a successful enterprise a comparative failure. The deficiency created by the miscarriage of an undertaking is soon filled up by fresh hopes; for they alone are enabled to call a thing hoped for a thing got, by the speed with which they act upon their resolutions. 8 Thus they toil on in trouble and danger all the days of their life, with little opportunity for enjoying, being ever engaged in getting: their only idea of a holiday is to do what the occasion demands, and to them laborious occupation is less of a misfortune than the peace of a quiet life. 9 To describe their character in a word, one might truly say that they were born into the world to take no rest themselves and to give none to others.


nannan,Besides, we consider that we have as good a right as any one to point out a neighbor's faults, particularly when we contemplate the great contrast between the two national characters; a contrast of which, as far as we can see, you have little perception, having never yet considered what sort of antagonists you will encounter in the Athenians, how widely, how absolutely different from yourselves. ,The Athenians are addicted to innovation, and their designs are characterized by swiftness alike in conception and execution; you have a genius for keeping what you have got, accompanied by a total want of invention, and when forced to act you never go far enough. ,Again, they are adventurous beyond their power, and daring beyond their judgment, and in danger they are sanguine; your wont is to attempt less than is justified by your power, to mistrust even what is sanctioned by your judgment, and to fancy that from danger there is no release. ,Further, there is promptitude on their side against procrastination on yours; they are never at home, you are never from it: for they hope by their absence to extend their acquisitions, you fear by your advance to endanger what you have left behind. ,They are swift to follow up a success, and slow to recoil from a reverse. , Their bodies they spend ungrudgingly in their country's cause; their intellect they jealously husband to be employed in her service. ,A scheme unexecuted is with them a positive loss, a successful enterprise a comparative failure. The deficiency created by the miscarriage of an undertaking is soon filled up by fresh hopes; for they alone are enabled to call a thing hoped for a thing got, by the speed with which they act upon their resolutions. ,Thus they toil on in trouble and danger all the days of their life, with little opportunity for enjoying, being ever engaged in getting: their only idea of a holiday is to do what the occasion demands, and to them laborious occupation is less of a misfortune than the peace of a quiet life. ,To describe their character in a word, one might truly say that they were born into the world to take no rest themselves and to give none to others.


nanSuch is Athens, your antagonist. And yet, Lacedaemonians, you still delay, and fail to see that peace stays longest with those, who are not more careful to use their power justly than to show their determination not to submit to injustice. On the contrary, your ideal of fair dealing is based on the principle that if you do not injure others, you need not risk your own fortunes in preventing others from injuring you. 2 Now you could scarcely have succeeded in such a policy even with a neighbor like yourselves; but in the present instance, as we have just shown, your habits are old-fashioned as compared with theirs. 3 It is the law as in art, so in politics, that improvements ever prevail; and though fixed usages may be best for undisturbed communities, constant necessities of action must be accompanied by the constant improvement of methods. Thus it happens that the vast experience of Athens has carried her further than you on the path of innovation. 4 Here, at least, let your procrastination end. For the present, assist your allies and Potidaea in particular, as you promised, by a speedy invasion of Attica, and do not sacrifice friends and kindred to their bitterest enemies, and drive the rest of us in despair to some other alliance. 5 Such a step would not be condemned either by the gods who received our oaths, or by the men who witnessed them. The breach of a treaty cannot be laid to the people whom desertion compels to seek new relations, but to the power that fails to assist its confederate. 6 But if you will only act, we will stand by you; it would be unnatural for us to change, and never should we meet with such a congenial ally. 7 For these reasons choose the right course, and endeavor not to let Peloponnese under your supremacy degenerate from the prestige that it enjoyed under that of your ancestors.'


nannan, Such is Athens, your antagonist. And yet, Lacedaemonians, you still delay, and fail to see that peace stays longest with those, who are not more careful to use their power justly than to show their determination not to submit to injustice. On the contrary, your ideal of fair dealing is based on the principle that if you do not injure others, you need not risk your own fortunes in preventing others from injuring you. ,Now you could scarcely have succeeded in such a policy even with a neighbor like yourselves; but in the present instance, as we have just shown, your habits are old-fashioned as compared with theirs. ,It is the law as in art, so in politics, that improvements ever prevail; and though fixed usages may be best for undisturbed communities, constant necessities of action must be accompanied by the constant improvement of methods. Thus it happens that the vast experience of Athens has carried her further than you on the path of innovation. , Here, at least, let your procrastination end. For the present, assist your allies and Potidaea in particular, as you promised, by a speedy invasion of Attica, and do not sacrifice friends and kindred to their bitterest enemies, and drive the rest of us in despair to some other alliance. ,Such a step would not be condemned either by the gods who received our oaths, or by the men who witnessed them. The breach of a treaty cannot be laid to the people whom desertion compels to seek new relations, but to the power that fails to assist its confederate. ,But if you will only act, we will stand by you; it would be unnatural for us to change, and never should we meet with such a congenial ally. ,For these reasons choose the right course, and endeavor not to let Peloponnese under your supremacy degenerate from the prestige that it enjoyed under that of your ancestors.’


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 618-694, 411 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

411. In time when first your sickles for the field
2. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 306-310, 328-331, 343-345, 411, 417-418, 954, 232 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Herodotus, Histories, 3.81.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.1.1-1.1.2, 1.6.4, 1.18-1.19, 1.22.4, 1.23.1-1.23.3, 1.23.6, 1.24, 1.30, 1.32-1.43, 1.44.1, 1.46, 1.66, 1.68-1.69, 1.70.4, 1.71-1.118, 1.71.3, 1.76.2, 1.84.2, 1.84.4, 1.89.1, 1.107.4, 1.108.2-1.108.3, 1.118.2, 1.120, 1.124, 1.126-1.139, 1.138.3, 2.47-2.53, 2.59, 2.65, 2.65.5-2.65.13, 3.30, 3.37-3.48, 3.53-3.67, 3.81-3.84, 3.82.2, 4.40.1, 4.59-4.64, 4.85-4.87, 4.92, 5.43.2-5.43.3, 5.82, 6.5, 6.9-6.24, 6.32.41, 6.54-6.59, 8.24.2, 8.96.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.1.1. Thucydides, an Athenian, wrote the history of the war between the Peloponnesians and the Athenians, beginning at the moment that it broke out, and believing that it would be a great war, and more worthy of relation than any that had preceded it. This belief was not without its grounds. The preparations of both the combatants were in every department in the last state of perfection; and he could see the rest of the Hellenic race taking sides in the quarrel; those who delayed doing so at once having it in contemplation. 1.1.2. Indeed this was the greatest movement yet known in history, not only of the Hellenes, but of a large part of the barbarian world—I had almost said of mankind. 1.6.4. On the contrary a modest style of dressing, more in conformity with modern ideas, was first adopted by the Lacedaemonians, the rich doing their best to assimilate their way of life to that of the common people. 1.22.4. The absence of romance in my history will, I fear, detract somewhat from its interest; but if it be judged useful by those inquirers who desire an exact knowledge of the past as an aid to the interpretation of the future, which in the course of human things must resemble if it does not reflect it, I shall be content. In fine, I have written my work, not as an essay which is to win the applause of the moment, but as a possession for all time. 1.23.1. The Median war, the greatest achievement of past times, yet found a speedy decision in two actions by sea and two by land. The Peloponnesian war was prolonged to an immense length, and long as it was it was short without parallel for the misfortunes that it brought upon Hellas . 1.23.3. Old stories of occurrences handed down by tradition, but scantily confirmed by experience, suddenly ceased to be incredible; there were earthquakes of unparalleled extent and violence; eclipses of the sun occurred with a frequency unrecorded in previous history; there were great droughts in sundry places and consequent famines, and that most calamitous and awfully fatal visitation, the plague. All this came upon them with the late war 1.23.6. The real cause I consider to be the one which was formally most kept out of sight. The growth of the power of Athens, and the alarm which this inspired in Lacedaemon, made war inevitable. Still it is well to give the grounds alleged by either side, which led to the dissolution of the treaty and the breaking out of the war. 1.44.1. Such were the words of the Corinthians. When the Athenians had heard both out, two assemblies were held. In the first there was a manifest disposition to listen to the representations of Corinth ; in the second, public feeling had changed, and an alliance with Corcyra was decided on, with certain reservations. It was to be a defensive, not an offensive alliance. It did not involve a breach of the treaty with Peloponnese : Athens could not be required to join Corcyra in any attack upon Corinth . But each of the contracting parties had a right to the other's assistance against invasion, whether of his own territory, or that of an ally. 1.70.4. Further, there is promptitude on their side against procrastination on yours; they are never at home, you are never from it: for they hope by their absence to extend their acquisitions, you fear by your advance to endanger what you have left behind. 1.71.3. It is the law as in art, so in politics, that improvements ever prevail; and though fixed usages may be best for undisturbed communities, constant necessities of action must be accompanied by the constant improvement of methods. Thus it happens that the vast experience of Athens has carried her further than you on the path of innovation. 1.76.2. It follows that it was not a very wonderful action, or contrary to the common practice of mankind, if we did accept an empire that was offered to us, and refused to give it up under the pressure of three of the strongest motives, fear, honor, and interest. And it was not we who set the example, for it has always been the law that the weaker should be subject to the stronger. Besides, we believed ourselves to be worthy of our position, and so you thought us till now, when calculations of interest have made you take up the cry of justice—a consideration which no one ever yet brought forward to hinder his ambition when he had a chance of gaining anything by might. 1.84.2. The quality which they condemn is really nothing but a wise moderation; thanks to its possession, we alone do not become insolent in success and give way less than others in misfortune; we are not carried away by the pleasure of hearing ourselves cheered on to risks which our judgment condemns; nor, if annoyed, are we any the more convinced by attempts to exasperate us by accusation. 1.84.4. In practice we always base our preparations against an enemy on the assumption that his plans are good; indeed, it is right to rest our hopes not on a belief in his blunders, but on the soundness of our provisions. Nor ought we to believe that there is much difference between man and man, but to think that the superiority lies with him who is reared in the severest school. 1.89.1. The way in which Athens came to be placed in the circumstances under which her power grew was this. 1.108.2. After entering the Megarid and cutting down the fruit trees, the Lacedaemonians returned home across Geraneia and the isthmus. Sixty-two days after the battle the Athenians marched into Boeotia under the command of Myronides 1.108.3. defeated the Boeotians in battle at Oenophyta, and became masters of Boeotia and Phocis . They dismantled the walls of the Tanagraeans, took a hundred of the richest men of the Opuntian Locrians as hostages, and finished their own long walls. 1.118.2. All these actions of the Hellenes against each other and the barbarian occurred in the fifty years' interval between the retreat of Xerxes and the beginning of the present war. During this interval the Athenians succeeded in placing their empire on a firmer basis, and advanced their own home power to a very great height. The Lacedaemonians, though fully aware of it, opposed it only for a little while, but remained inactive during most of the period, being of old slow to go to war except under the pressure of necessity, and in the present instance being hampered by wars at home; until the growth of the Athenian power could be no longer ignored, and their own confederacy became the object of its encroachments. They then felt that they could endure it no longer, but that the time had come for them to throw themselves heart and soul upon the hostile power, and break it, if they could, by commencing the present war. 1.138.3. For Themistocles was a man who exhibited the most indubitable signs of genius; indeed, in this particular he has a claim on our admiration quite extraordinary and unparalleled. By his own native capacity, alike unformed and unsupplemented by study, he was at once the best judge in those sudden crises which admit of little or of no deliberation, and the best prophet of the future, even to its most distant possibilities. An able theoretical expositor of all that came within the sphere of his practice, he was not without the power of passing an adequate judgment in matters in which he had no experience. He could also excellently divine the good and evil which lay hid in the unseen future. In fine, whether we consider the extent of his natural powers, or the slightness of his application, this extraordinary man must be allowed to have surpassed all others in the faculty of intuitively meeting an emergency. 2.65.5. For as long as he was at the head of the state during the peace, he pursued a moderate and conservative policy; and in his time its greatness was at its height. When the war broke out, here also he seems to have rightly gauged the power of his country. 2.65.6. He outlived its commencement two years and six months, and the correctness of his previsions respecting it became better known by his death. 2.65.7. He told them to wait quietly, to pay attention to their marine, to attempt no new conquests, and to expose the city to no hazards during the war, and doing this, promised them a favorable result. What they did was the very contrary, allowing private ambitions and private interests, in matters apparently quite foreign to the war, to lead them into projects unjust both to themselves and to their allies—projects whose success would only conduce to the honor and advantage of private persons, and whose failure entailed certain disaster on the country in the war. 2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen. 2.65.10. With his successors it was different. More on a level with one another, and each grasping at supremacy, they ended by committing even the conduct of state affairs to the whims of the multitude. 2.65.11. This, as might have been expected in a great and sovereign state, produced a host of blunders, and amongst them the Sicilian expedition; though this failed not so much through a miscalculation of the power of those against whom it was sent, as through a fault in the senders in not taking the best measures afterwards to assist those who had gone out, but choosing rather to occupy themselves with private cabals for the leadership of the commons, by which they not only paralyzed operations in the field, but also first introduced civil discord at home. 2.65.12. Yet after losing most of their fleet besides other forces in Sicily, and with faction already domit in the city, they could still for three years make head against their original adversaries, joined not only by the Sicilians, but also by their own allies nearly all in revolt, and at last by the king's son, Cyrus, who furnished the funds for the Peloponnesian navy. Nor did they finally succumb till they fell the victims of their own intestine disorders. 2.65.13. So superfluously abundant were the resources from which the genius of Pericles foresaw an easy triumph in the war over the unaided forces of the Peloponnesians. 3.82.2. The sufferings which revolution entailed upon the cities were many and terrible, such as have occurred and always will occur, as long as the nature of mankind remains the same; though in a severer or milder form, and varying in their symptoms, according to the variety of the particular cases. In peace and prosperity states and individuals have better sentiments, because they do not find themselves suddenly confronted with imperious necessities; but war takes away the easy supply of daily wants, and so proves a rough master, that brings most men's characters to a level with their fortunes. 4.40.1. Nothing that happened in the war surprised the Hellenes so much as this. It was the opinion that no force or famine could make the Lacedaemonians give up their arms, but that they would fight on as they could, and die with them in their hands: 5.43.2. Foremost amongst these was Alcibiades, son of Clinias, a man yet young in years for any other Hellenic city, but distinguished by the splendor of his ancestry. Alcibiades thought the Argive alliance really preferable, not that personal pique had not also a great deal to do with his opposition; he being offended with the Lacedaemonians for having negotiated the treaty through Nicias and Laches, and having overlooked him on account of his youth, and also for not having shown him the respect due to the ancient connection of his family with them as their Proxeni, which, renounced by his grandfather, he had lately himself thought to renew by his attentions to their prisoners taken in the island. 8.24.2. Meanwhile Leon and Diomedon with the Athenian fleet from Lesbos issuing from the OeLacedaenussae, the isles off Chios, and from their forts of Sidussa and Pteleum in the Erythraeid, and from Lesbos, carried on the war against the Chians from the ships, having on board heavy infantry from the rolls pressed to serve as marines. 8.96.5. But here, as on so many other occasions the Lacedaemonians proved the most convenient people in the world for the Athenians to be at war with. The wide difference between the two characters, the slowness and want of energy of the Lacedaemonians as contrasted with the dash and enterprise of their opponents, proved of the greatest service, especially to a maritime empire like Athens . Indeed this was shown by the Syracusans, who were most like the Athenians in character, and also most successful in combating them.
5. Polybius, Histories, 3.31-3.32 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.31. 1.  It might be said by some of these who look on such things without discernment, that these are matters which it was not necessary for me to treat in such detail.,2.  My answer is, that if there were any man who considered that he had sufficient force in himself to face any circumstances, I should say perhaps that knowledge of the past was good for him, but not necessary;,3.  but if there is no one in this world at least who would venture to speak so of himself either as regards his private fortunes or those of his country — since, even if all is well with him now no man of sense could from his present circumstances have any reasonable confidence that he will be prosperous in the future —,4.  I affirm for this reason that such knowledge is not only good but in the highest degree necessary.,5.  For how can anyone when wronged himself or when his country is wronged find helpmates and allies; how can he, when desirous of acquiring some possession or initiating some project, stir to action those whose co-operation he wishes;,6.  how, finally, if he is content with present conditions, can he rightly stimulate others to establish his own convictions and maintain things as they are, if he knows nothing at all of the past history of those he would influence?,7.  For all men are given to adapt themselves to the present and assume a character suited to the times, so that from their words and actions it is difficult to judge of the principles of each, and in many cases the truth is quite overcast.,8.  But men's past actions, bringing to bear the test of actual fact, indicate truly the principles and opinions of each, and show us where we may look for gratitude, kindness, and help, and where for the reverse.,9.  It is by this means that we shall often and in many circumstances find those who will compassionate our distresses, who will share our anger or join us in being avenged on our enemies,,10.  all which is most helpful to life both in public and in private.,11.  Therefore both writers and readers of history should not pay so much attention to the actual narrative of events, as to what precedes, what accompanies, and what follows each.,12.  For if we take from history the discussion of why, how, and wherefore each thing was done, and whether the result was what we should have reasonably expected,,13.  what is left is a clever essay but not a lesson, and while pleasing for the moment of no possible benefit for the future. 3.32. 1.  For this reason I must pronounce those to be much mistaken who think that this my work is difficult to acquire and difficult to read owing to the number and length of the Books it contains.,2.  How much easier it is to acquire and peruse forty Books, all as it were connected by one thread, and thus to follow clearly events in Italy, Sicily, and Libya from the time of Pyrrhus to the capture of Carthage,,3.  and those in the rest of the world from the flight of Cleomenes of Sparta on till the battle of the Romans and Achaeans at the Isthmus, than to read or procure the works of those who treat of particular transactions.,4.  Apart from their being many times as long as my history, readers cannot gather anything with certainty from them, firstly because most of them give different accounts of the same matter,,5.  and next because they omit those contemporary events by a comparative review and estimation of which we can assign its true value to everything much more surely than by judging from particulars; and, finally, because it is out of their power even to touch on what is most essential.,6.  For I maintain that far the most essential part of history is the consideration of the remote or immediate consequences of events and especially that of causes.,7.  Thus I regard the war with Antiochus as deriving its origin from that with Philip, the latter as resulting from that with Hannibal, and the Hannibalic war as a consequence of that about Sicily, the intermediate events, however many and various their character, all tending to the same purpose.,8.  All this can be recognized and understood from a general history, but not at all from the historians of the wars themselves, such as the war with Perseus or that with Philip,,9.  unless indeed anyone reading their descriptions of the battles alone conceives that he has acquired an adequate knowledge of the management and nature of the whole war.,10.  This, however, is not at all so, and I consider that my history differs to its advantage as much from the works on particular episodes as learning does from listening.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abstract nominal forms (in ancient greek generally), overview of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 26
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, idiosyncratic by standards of greek prose Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 26
aegean Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 275
aeschylus, and athletics Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
aeschylus, and military training Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
aeschylus, and paideia Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
aeschylus, embodied response Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
aeschylus, institutional settings and vocabularies Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
aeschylus, social and behavioural bases Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
agricultural calendar Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
agriculture, as a metapoetic metaphor in hesiod Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259, 275, 449
alcidas Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 275, 465
anacreon Zanker, The Mask of Socrates: The Image of the Intellectual in Antiquity (1996) 31
archidamus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 106
architecture Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
ares, ares, temple of Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
aristotle Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
astyochus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 465
athenagoras Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 524
athenian character Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 141, 195, 208, 217, 275
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 208
athenians Miltsios, Leadership and Leaders in Polybius (2023) 114
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10, 105, 106
athens Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10; Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
athletics Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
attica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 275, 669
audience Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
authority, poetic Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
brasidas Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
camarina Miltsios, Leadership and Leaders in Polybius (2023) 114
carthaginians Miltsios, Leadership and Leaders in Polybius (2023) 114
cimon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 194
citizen Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
cleon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 208
cnemos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 465
comedy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
contingency Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
corcyra Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 106; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 191, 259, 524, 669
corcyraeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
corinth, corinthian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 106
corinth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259, 471, 669
corinthian gulf Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 449
corinthians Miltsios, Leadership and Leaders in Polybius (2023) 114; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 141
debate Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
democracy and monarchy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
diodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 208
ephialtes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 194
epidamnos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
eris Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
eros, patriotic Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
food Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
herodotus, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 191
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10, 105, 106; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 217, 561
hesiod Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
hipparchos (son of peisistratus) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 669
homer Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
hope Chaniotis, Unveiling Emotions: Sources and Methods for the Study of Emotions in the Greek World vol (2012) 151
imagination Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
ion of chios Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
kosmopolites, cultural Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
leucimme Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
literature Chaniotis, Unveiling Emotions: Sources and Methods for the Study of Emotions in the Greek World vol (2012) 151
localization Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
mantinea, battle of Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 471
megara, megarian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 106
memory, visual Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
military training and aesthetics Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
monarchy and democracy, debate between theseus and theban herald on Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
monuments Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
narrative Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 218, 275, 449
paideia Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
panegyric Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
pathology of war, locus classicus for abstract style Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 26
pericles Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92; Zanker, The Mask of Socrates: The Image of the Intellectual in Antiquity (1996) 31
perses Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
persian wars Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 106
phormio Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 218, 449
pindar Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
plague Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 191, 208
poetry, and aristocratic power Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
political life, aesthetic standards based in Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 196
politics, eros, patriotic Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
post-classical Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
potidaea Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 106
rhetoric Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
rhetorical exercise Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
ritual Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
romans Miltsios, Leadership and Leaders in Polybius (2023) 114
sicilian debate Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 218
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 449, 471
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 471, 561
society Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
space control Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10, 105, 106
speeches Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
statue, pindar Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
stesimbrotus, of thasos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
stoa, royal Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
suppliant women aithras intercession with theseus in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
suppliant women theban herald, debate on democracy and monarchy between theseus and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
suppliant women war, deliberation of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
symposium Zanker, The Mask of Socrates: The Image of the Intellectual in Antiquity (1996) 31
temple, of ares Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
teutiaplus Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
thebes Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
thucydides, son of melesias, archaeology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 561
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 471, 561
thucydides, son of melesias, authorial statements, judgementnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 275
thucydides, son of melesias, causes, causality Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 191
thucydides, son of melesias, digressions Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 191
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 561
thucydides, son of melesias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 194
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10, 105, 106; Chaniotis, Unveiling Emotions: Sources and Methods for the Study of Emotions in the Greek World vol (2012) 151; Miltsios, Leadership and Leaders in Polybius (2023) 114; Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
timeliness Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
topography, topographical Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
travel Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 105
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 88
troy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 10
tukhe(chance)' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 118
women Papaioannou Serafim and Demetriou, The Ancient Art of Persuasion across Genres and Topics (2019) 92
xanthippos Zanker, The Mask of Socrates: The Image of the Intellectual in Antiquity (1996) 31
xenophon, ps.-xenophon, ath. pol. Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 141