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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 1.30


nanAfter the engagement the Corcyraeans set up a trophy on Leukimme, a headland of Corcyra, and slew all their captives except the Corinthians, whom they kept as prisoners of war. 2 Defeated at sea, the Corinthians and their allies repaired home, and left the Corcyraeans masters of all the sea about those parts. Sailing to Leucas, a Corinthian colony, they ravaged their territory, and burnt Cyllene, the harbor of the Eleans, because they had furnished ships and money to Corinth. 3 For almost the whole of the period that followed the battle they remained masters of the sea, and the allies of Corinth were harassed by Corcyraean cruisers. At last Corinth, roused by the sufferings of her allies, sent out ships and troops in the fall of the summer, who formed an encampment at Actium and about Chimerium, in Thesprotis, for the protection of Leucas and the rest of the friendly cities. 4 The Corcyraeans on their part formed a similar station on Leukimme. Neither party made any movement, but they remained confronting each other till the end of the summer, and winter was at hand before either of them returned home.


nannan, After the engagement the Corcyraeans set up a trophy on Leukimme, a headland of Corcyra, and slew all their captives except the Corinthians, whom they kept as prisoners of war. ,Defeated at sea, the Corinthians and their allies repaired home, and left the Corcyraeans masters of all the sea about those parts. Sailing to Leucas, a Corinthian colony, they ravaged their territory, and burnt Cyllene, the harbor of the Eleans, because they had furnished ships and money to Corinth . ,For almost the whole of the period that followed the battle they remained masters of the sea, and the allies of Corinth were harassed by Corcyraean cruisers. At last Corinth, roused by the sufferings of her allies, sent out ships and troops in the fall of the summer, who formed an encampment at Actium and about Chimerium, in Thesprotis, for the protection of Leucas and the rest of the friendly cities. ,The Corcyraeans on their part formed a similar station on Leukimme. Neither party made any movement, but they remained confronting each other till the end of the summer, and winter was at hand before either of them returned home.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.61.1-1.61.3 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.61.3. The opinion of Hippias prevailing, that they should recover the sovereignty, they set out collecting contributions from all the cities that owed them anything. Many of these gave great amounts, the Thebans more than any
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.23.6, 1.24, 1.24.1, 1.25.2, 1.29, 1.32-1.43, 1.44.2, 1.46, 1.66, 1.70, 1.73, 1.84, 1.89-1.92, 1.94-1.95, 1.98, 1.101-1.103, 1.105-1.107, 1.113, 1.126-1.139, 2.47, 2.54, 6.5, 6.54-6.59, 6.55.1, 7.49 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.23.6. The real cause I consider to be the one which was formally most kept out of sight. The growth of the power of Athens, and the alarm which this inspired in Lacedaemon, made war inevitable. Still it is well to give the grounds alleged by either side, which led to the dissolution of the treaty and the breaking out of the war. 1.24.1. The city of Epidamnus stands on the right of the entrance of the Ionic gulf. Its vicinity is inhabited by the Taulantians, an Illyrian people. 1.25.2. So the Epidamnians went to Corinth, and delivered over the colony in obedience to the commands of the oracle. They showed that their founder came from Corinth, and revealed the answer of the god; and they begged them not to allow them to perish, but to assist them. 1.44.2. For it began now to be felt that the coming of the Peloponnesian war was only a question of time, and no one was willing to see a naval power of such magnitude as Corcyra sacrificed to Corinth ; though if they could let them weaken each other by mutual conflict, it would be no bad preparation for the struggle which Athens might one day have to wage with Corinth and the other naval powers. 6.55.1. That Hippias was the eldest son and succeeded to the government, is what I positively assert as a fact upon which I have had more exact accounts than others, and may be also ascertained by the following circumstance. He is the only one of the legitimate brothers that appears to have had children; as the altar shows, and the pillar placed in the Athenian Acropolis, commemorating the crime of the tyrants, which mentions no child of Thessalus or of Hipparchus, but five of Hippias, which he had by Myrrhine, daughter of Callias, son of Hyperechides; and naturally the eldest would have married first.
3. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 17.3-17.4, 18.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"historiography, classical" Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
agatharchides of cnidus Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
attica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 669
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259, 346, 347, 669
corcyraeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259, 347
corinth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259, 261, 346, 347, 669
epidamnos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 254, 259, 261, 346
harmodios, tyrannicide Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 196
hegistratos, son of peisistratos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 196
herodotus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 254
hipparchos, son peisistratos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 196
hipparchos (son of peisistratus) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 669
hippias, tyrant, son of peisistratos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 196
leucimme Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 259
nicias Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
omens Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
oracles Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
pallene Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 196
peisistratos, tyrant of athens Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 196
piety Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
sacrifices Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
thirty years peace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 346, 347
thucydides, son of melesias, causes, causality Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 346
thucydides, son of melesias, historical truth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 346, 347
thucydides, son of melesias, language' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 346
thucydides Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210
xenophon Hau, Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus (2017) 210