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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 1.18.1


ἐπειδὴ δὲ οἵ τε Ἀθηναίων τύραννοι καὶ οἱ ἐκ τῆς ἄλλης Ἑλλάδος ἐπὶ πολὺ καὶ πρὶν τυραννευθείσης οἱ πλεῖστοι καὶ τελευταῖοι πλὴν τῶν ἐν Σικελίᾳ ὑπὸ Λακεδαιμονίων κατελύθησαν ʽἡ γὰρ Λακεδαίμων μετὰ τὴν κτίσιν τῶν νῦν ἐνοικούντων αὐτὴν Δωριῶν ἐπὶ πλεῖστον ὧν ἴσμεν χρόνον στασιάσασα ὅμως ἐκ παλαιτάτου καὶ ηὐνομήθη καὶ αἰεὶ ἀτυράννευτος ἦν: ἔτη γάρ ἐστι μάλιστα τετρακόσια καὶ ὀλίγῳ πλείω ἐς τὴν τελευτὴν τοῦδε τοῦ πολέμου ἀφ’ οὗ Λακεδαιμόνιοι τῇ αὐτῇ πολιτείᾳ χρῶνται, καὶ δι’ αὐτὸ δυνάμενοι καὶ τὰ ἐν ταῖς ἄλλαις πόλεσι καθίστασαν̓, μετὰ δὲ τὴν τῶν τυράννων κατάλυσιν ἐκ τῆς Ἑλλάδος οὐ πολλοῖς ἔτεσιν ὕστερον καὶ ἡ ἐν Μαραθῶνι μάχη Μήδων πρὸς Ἀθηναίους ἐγένετο.But at last a time came when the tyrants of Athens and the far older tyrannies of the rest of Hellas were, with the exception of those in Sicily, once and for all put down by Lacedaemon ; for this city, though after the settlement of the Dorians, its present inhabitants, it suffered from factions for an unparalleled length of time, still at a very early period obtained good laws, and enjoyed a freedom from tyrants which was unbroken; it has possessed the same form of government for more than four hundred years, reckoning to the end of the late war, and has thus been in a position to arrange the affairs of the other states. Not many years after the deposition of the tyrants, the battle of Marathon was fought between the Medes and the Athenians.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 12.310-12.328 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

12.310. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.311. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.312. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.313. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.314. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.315. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.316. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.317. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.318. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.319. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.320. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.321. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.322. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.323. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.324. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.325. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us. 12.326. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us. 12.327. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us. 12.328. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us.
2. Tyrtaeus, Fragments, 1 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

3. Herodotus, Histories, 1.65, 5.22, 7.104.4-7.104.5 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.65. So Croesus learned that at that time such problems were oppressing the Athenians, but that the Lacedaemonians had escaped from the great evils and had mastered the Tegeans in war. In the kingship of Leon and Hegesicles at Sparta, the Lacedaemonians were successful in all their other wars but met disaster only against the Tegeans. ,Before this they had been the worst-governed of nearly all the Hellenes and had had no dealings with strangers, but they changed to good government in this way: Lycurgus, a man of reputation among the Spartans, went to the oracle at Delphi . As soon as he entered the hall, the priestess said in hexameter: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"You have come to my rich temple, Lycurgus, /l lA man dear to Zeus and to all who have Olympian homes. /l lI am in doubt whether to pronounce you man or god, /l lBut I think rather you are a god, Lycurgus. /l /quote ,Some say that the Pythia also declared to him the constitution that now exists at Sparta, but the Lacedaemonians themselves say that Lycurgus brought it from Crete when he was guardian of his nephew Leobetes, the Spartan king. ,Once he became guardian, he changed all the laws and took care that no one transgressed the new ones. Lycurgus afterwards established their affairs of war: the sworn divisions, the bands of thirty, the common meals; also the ephors and the council of elders. 5.22. Now that these descendants of Perdiccas are Greeks, as they themselves say, I myself chance to know and will prove it in the later part of my history. Furthermore, the Hellenodicae who manage the contest at Olympia determined that it is so, ,for when Alexander chose to contend and entered the lists for that purpose, the Greeks who were to run against him wanted to bar him from the race, saying that the contest should be for Greeks and not for foreigners. Alexander, however, proving himself to be an Argive, was judged to be a Greek. He accordingly competed in the furlong race and tied step for first place. This, then, is approximately what happened. 7.104.4. So is it with the Lacedaemonians; fighting singly they are as brave as any man living, and together they are the best warriors on earth. They are free, yet not wholly free: law is their master, whom they fear much more than your men fear you.
4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.4, 1.10.2, 1.13.6, 1.20, 1.21.2, 1.22.1-1.22.2, 1.78, 1.95.3, 1.140, 2.1, 2.61.3, 2.64.1, 4.17.4, 4.21.2, 4.41.4, 4.92.2, 4.106.1, 5.68.2, 6.4-6.5, 6.10.5, 6.15.4, 6.53-6.59, 6.83.1, 8.65.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.10.2. For I suppose if Lacedaemon were to become desolate, and the temples and the foundations of the public buildings were left, that as time went on there would be a strong disposition with posterity to refuse to accept her fame as a true exponent of her power. And yet they occupy two-fifths of Peloponnese and lead the whole, not to speak of their numerous allies without. Still, as the city is neither built in a compact form nor adorned with magnificent temples and public edifices, but composed of villages after the old fashion of Hellas, there would be an impression of inadequacy. Whereas, if Athens were to suffer the same misfortune, I suppose that any inference from the appearance presented to the eye would make her power to have been twice as great as it is. 1.13.6. Subsequently the Ionians attained to great naval strength in the reign of Cyrus, the first king of the Persians, and of his son Cambyses, and while they were at war with the former commanded for a while the Ionian sea. Polycrates also, the tyrant of Samos, had a powerful navy in the reign of Cambyses with which he reduced many of the islands, and among them Rhenea, which he consecrated to the Delian Apollo. About this time also the Phocaeans, while they were founding Marseilles, defeated the Carthaginians in a sea-fight. 1.21.2. To come to this war; despite the known disposition of the actors in a struggle to overrate its importance, and when it is over to return to their admiration of earlier events, yet an examination of the facts will show that it was much greater than the wars which preceded it. 1.22.1. With reference to the speeches in this history, some were delivered before the war began, others while it was going on; some I heard myself, others I got from various quarters; it was in all cases difficult to carry them word for word in one's memory, so my habit has been to make the speakers say what was in my opinion demanded of them by the various occasions, of course adhering as closely as possible to the general sense of what they really said. 1.22.2. And with reference to the narrative of events, far from permitting myself to derive it from the first source that came to hand, I did not even trust my own impressions, but it rests partly on what I saw myself, partly on what others saw for me, the accuracy of the report being always tried by the most severe and detailed tests possible. 1.95.3. In the meantime the Lacedaemonians recalled Pausanias for an investigation of the reports which had reached them. Manifold and grave accusations had been brought against him by Hellenes arriving in Sparta ; and, to all appearance, there had been in him more of the mimicry of a despot than of the attitude of a general. 2.61.3. For before what is sudden, unexpected, and least within calculation the spirit quails; and putting all else aside, the plague has certainly been an emergency of this kind. 2.64.1. But you must not be seduced by citizens like these nor be angry with me,—who, if I voted for war, only did as you did yourselves,—in spite of the enemy having invaded your country and done what you could be certain that he would do, if you refused to comply with his demands; and although besides what we counted for, the plague has come upon us—the only point indeed at which our calculation has been at fault. It is this, I know, that has had a large share in making me more unpopular than I should otherwise have been,—quite undeservedly, unless you are also prepared to give me the credit of any success with which chance may present you. 4.17.4. You can now, if you choose, employ your present success to advantage, so as to keep what you have got and gain honor and reputation besides, and you can avoid the mistake of those who meet with an extraordinary piece of good fortune, and are led on by hope to grasp continually at something further, through having already succeeded without expecting it. 4.21.2. The Athenians, however, having the men on the island, thought that the treaty would be ready for them whenever they chose to make it, and grasped at something further. 4.41.4. The Athenians, however, kept grasping at more, and dismissed envoy after envoy without their having effected anything. Such was the history of the affair of Pylos . 4.92.2. And if any one has taken up with the idea in question for reasons of safety, it is high time for him to change his mind. The party attacked, whose own country is in danger, can scarcely discuss what is prudent with the calmness of men who are in full enjoyment of what they have got, and are thinking of attacking a neighbour in order to get more. 5.68.2. though as to putting down the numbers of either host, or of the contingents composing it, I could not do so with any accuracy. Owing to the secrecy of their government the number of the Lacedaemonians was not known, and men are so apt to brag about the forces of their country that the estimate of their opponents was not trusted. The following calculation, however, makes it possible to estimate the numbers of the Lacedaemonians present upon this occasion. 6.10.5. A man ought, therefore, to consider these points, and not to think of running risks with a country placed so critically, or of grasping at another empire before we have secured the one we have already; for in fact the Thracian Chalcidians have been all these years in revolt from us without being yet subdued, and others on the continents yield us but a doubtful obedience. Meanwhile the Egestaeans, our allies, have been wronged, and we run to help them, while the rebels who have so long wronged us still wait for punishment. 6.15.4. Alarmed at the greatness of his license in his own life and habits, and of the ambition which he showed in all things soever that he undertook, the mass of the people set him down as a pretender to the tyranny, and became his enemies; and although publicly his conduct of the war was as good as could be desired individually, his habits gave offence to every one, and caused them to commit affairs to other hands, and thus before long to ruin the city. 6.83.1. We, therefore, deserve to rule because we placed the largest fleet and an unflinching patriotism at the service of the Hellenes, and because these, our subjects, did us mischief by their ready subservience to the Medes; and, desert apart, we seek to strengthen ourselves against the Peloponnesians. 8.65.2. Here they found most of the work already done by their associates. Some of the younger men had banded together, and secretly assassinated one Androcles, the chief leader of the commons, and mainly responsible for the banishment of Alcibiades; Androcles being singled out both because he was a popular leader, and because they sought by his death to recommend themselves to Alcibiades, who was, as they supposed, to be recalled, and to make Tissaphernes their friend. There were also some other obnoxious persons whom they secretly did away with in the same manner.
5. Xenophon, Constitution of The Spartans, 8.1-8.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 15.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.4. Then, going up to Ilium, he sacrificed to Athena and poured libations to the heroes. Furthermore, the gravestone of Achilles he anointed with oil, ran a race by it with his companions, naked, as is the custom, and then crowned it with garlands, pronouncing the hero happy in having, while he lived, a faithful friend, and after death, a great herald of his fame.
7. Plutarch, Lycurgus, 5.4-5.7, 7.2, 31.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.4. Thus encouraged, he tried to bring the chief men of Sparta over to his side, and exhorted them to put their hands to the work with him, explaining his designs secretly to his friends at first, then little by little engaging more and uniting them to attempt the task. And when the time for action came, he ordered thirty of the chief men to go armed into the market-place at break of day, to strike consternation and terror into those of the opposite party. The names of twenty of the most eminent among them have been recorded by Hermippus; but the man who had the largest share in all the undertakings of Lycurgus and cooperated with him in the enactment of his laws, bore the name of Arthmiadas. 5.6. Among the many innovations which Lycurgus made, the first and most important was his institution of a senate, or Council of Elders, which, as Plato says, Laws, p. 691 e. by being blended with the feverish government of the kings, and by having an equal vote with them in matters of the highest importance, brought safety and due moderation into counsels of state. For before this the civil polity was veering and unsteady, inclining at one time to follow the kings towards tyranny, and at another to follow the multitude towards democracy; 5.7. but now, by making the power of the senate a sort of ballast for the ship of state and putting her on a steady keel, it achieved the safest and the most orderly arrangement, since the twenty-eight senators always took the side of the kings when it was a question of curbing democracy, and, on the other hand, always strengthened the people to withstand the encroachments of tyranny. The number of the senators was fixed at twenty-eight because, according to Aristotle, two of the thirty original associates of Lycurgus abandoned the enterprise from lack of courage. 31.1. It was not, however, the chief design of Lycurgus then to leave his city in command over a great many others, but he thought that the happiness of an entire city, like that of a single individual, depended on the prevalence of virtue and concord within its own borders. The aim, therefore, of all his arrangements and adjustments was to make his people free-minded, self-sufficing, and moderate in all their ways, and to keep them so as long as possible.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
acropolis, of athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
agis Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 568
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 270, 568
alexander i of macedon Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
alexander iii (the great) of macedon Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
argos Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
argos and argives Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 41, 127
army Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
artaphernes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
assidui Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
astyochus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 568
athenian character Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 585
athenian empire Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 270
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
athletes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
cartledge, paul Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
chalcidian colonies, chalcidians (sicily)nan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
citizenship Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
civil strife Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
class, higher Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
class, lower Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
constitution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
councilmen, athenian (bouleutai), council, spartan (gerontes) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
cylon Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
delphi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
democracy, ancient and modern, definition of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
democracy, ancient and modern, preconditions for Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
demos (damos), empowerment of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
demos (damos), limitations placed on Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
drews, robert Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
egalitarianism Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
eion Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
election, considered undemocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
election Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
endius Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 568
ephors, qualifications for Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
ephors Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
equality Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
eretria Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
eryx Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
eunomia (eunomie) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41, 127
euthune, hoplite Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
finley, m. i. Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 41
freedmen Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
freedom Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
great rhetra Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 127
helots Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41, 127
heracles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
heraclids Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
herodotus, ethnic perspectives of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
herodotus, on sovereignty Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
herodotus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 241, 585
hippocrates of gela Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
history, historian Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 142, 158
homer, homeric, elite bias of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
hoplites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
ideology, of the homoioi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
kings Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
kingship, among greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
kingship, divine Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
kingship, homeric Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
kingship, macedonian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
kingship, spartan Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
kudos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
law, rule of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 41
lawgivers Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
leontinoi Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
lycia and lycians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
lycurgus (spartan) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 585
lycurgus (spartan lawgiver) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 41
macedon and macedonians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
mantinea, battle of Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 568, 585
messenia, messenians Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
metics Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
navy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
naxians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
naxos (sicily) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
nicias Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 585
nomos Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
oligarchy, oligarchs Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
olympia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
origine Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 158
participation in government, by all citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
participation in government, military service and Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 41, 127
participation in government Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
past Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 142, 158
phoenicians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
plebeians Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
plutarch, life of lycurgus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 585
plutarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 585
present Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 142
proletarii Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
protodemocracy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
public office, officials Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 41
representation Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
salaithos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 241
samos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 270
sicels Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
sikanians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
slavery, slaves Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41, 127
socrates Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 585
soldiers Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
sparta and spartans, and victors Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
sparta and spartans, kingship at Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
thetes, militarization of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 127
thucydides, son of melesias, archaeology Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 241, 270, 585
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 585
thucydides, son of melesias, chance Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 241, 270
thucydides, son of melesias, exile Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 568
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 270, 630, 658
tomb, of achilles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
troy and trojans, later visitors to Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
tyranny, and victory and conquest Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
veto Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40
warfare Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 40, 41, 127
wealth Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41
xenophanes of colophon Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
xenophon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 41; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 568, 585
xerxes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
zankle' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 630
zeus, and kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27
zeus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 27