Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 1.16.1


ἐπεγένετο δὲ ἄλλοις τε ἄλλοθι κωλύματα μὴ αὐξηθῆναι, καὶ Ἴωσι προχωρησάντων ἐπὶ μέγα τῶν πραγμάτων Κῦρος καὶ ἡ Περσικὴ βασιλεία Κροῖσον καθελοῦσα καὶ ὅσα ἐντὸς Ἅλυος ποταμοῦ πρὸς θάλασσαν ἐπεστράτευσε καὶ τὰς ἐν τῇ ἠπείρῳ πόλεις ἐδούλωσε, Δαρεῖός τε ὕστερον τῷ Φοινίκων ναυτικῷ κρατῶν καὶ τὰς νήσους.Various, too, were the obstacles which the national growth encountered in various localities. The power of the Ionians was advancing with rapid strides, when it came into collision with Persia, under King Cyrus, who, after having dethroned Croesus and overrun everything between the Halys and the sea, stopped not till he had reduced the cities of the coast; the islands being only left to be subdued by Darius and the Phoenician navy.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

1 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.2.6, 1.7, 1.13.6, 1.15.1, 1.15.3, 1.17, 1.19, 1.23.1, 1.73.4, 1.89-1.118, 1.89.2, 1.90.3, 1.96.1, 1.97.2, 1.98.1, 1.118.1, 2.34.5, 2.63.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.2.6. And here is no inconsiderable exemplification of my assertion, that the migrations were the cause of there being no correspondent growth in other parts. The most powerful victims of war or faction from the rest of Hellas took refuge with the Athenians as a safe retreat; and at an early period, becoming naturalized, swelled the already large population of the city to such a height that Attica became at last too small to hold them, and they had to send out colonies to Ionia . 1.13.6. Subsequently the Ionians attained to great naval strength in the reign of Cyrus, the first king of the Persians, and of his son Cambyses, and while they were at war with the former commanded for a while the Ionian sea. Polycrates also, the tyrant of Samos, had a powerful navy in the reign of Cambyses with which he reduced many of the islands, and among them Rhenea, which he consecrated to the Delian Apollo. About this time also the Phocaeans, while they were founding Marseilles, defeated the Carthaginians in a sea-fight. 1.15.1. The navies, then, of the Hellenes during the period we have traversed were what I have described. All their insignificance did not prevent their being an element of the greatest power to those who cultivated them, alike in revenue and in dominion. They were the means by which the islands were reached and reduced, those of the smallest area falling the easiest prey. 1.15.3. The nearest approach to a coalition took place in the old war between Chalcis and Eretria ; this was a quarrel in which the rest of the Hellenic name did to some extent take sides. 1.23.1. The Median war, the greatest achievement of past times, yet found a speedy decision in two actions by sea and two by land. The Peloponnesian war was prolonged to an immense length, and long as it was it was short without parallel for the misfortunes that it brought upon Hellas . 1.73.4. We assert that at Marathon we were at the front, and faced the barbarian single-handed. That when he came the second time, unable to cope with him by land we went on board our ships with all our people, and joined in the action at Salamis . This prevented his taking the Peloponnesian states in detail, and ravaging them with his fleet; when the multitude of his vessels would have made any combination for self-defence impossible. 1.89.2. After the Medes had returned from Europe, defeated by sea and land by the Hellenes, and after those of them who had fled with their ships to Mycale had been destroyed, Leotychides, King of the Lacedaemonians, the commander of the Hellenes at Mycale, departed home with the allies from Peloponnese . But the Athenians and the allies from Ionia and Hellespont, who had now revolted from the king, remained and laid siege to Sestos, which was still held by the Medes. After wintering before it, they became masters of the place on its evacuation by the barbarians; and after this they sailed away from Hellespont to their respective cities. 1.90.3. After the Lacedaemonians had thus spoken, they were, on the advice of Themistocles, immediately dismissed by the Athenians, with the answer that ambassadors should be sent to Sparta to discuss the question. Themistocles told the Athenians to send him off with all speed to Lacedaemon, but not to despatch his colleagues as soon as they had selected them, but to wait until they had raised their wall to the height from which defence was possible. Meanwhile the whole population in the city was to labour at the wall, the Athenians, their wives and their children, sparing no edifice, private or public, which might be of any use to the work, but throwing all down. 1.96.1. The Athenians having thus succeeded to the supremacy by the voluntary act of the allies through their hatred of Pausanias, fixed which cities were to contribute money against the barbarian, which ships; their professed object being to retaliate for their sufferings by ravaging the king's country. 1.97.2. My excuse for relating these events, and for venturing on this digression, is that this passage of history has been omitted by all my predecessors, who have confined themselves either to Hellenic history before the Median war, or to the Median war itself. Hellanicus, it is true, did touch on these events in his Athenian history; but he is somewhat concise and not accurate in his dates. Besides, the history of these events contains an explanation of the growth of the Athenian empire. 1.98.1. First the Athenians besieged and captured Eion on the Strymon from the Medes, and made slaves of the inhabitants, being under the command of Cimon, son of Miltiades. 1.118.1. After this, though not many years later, we at length come to what has been already related, the affairs of Corcyra and Potidaea, and the events that served as a pretext for the present war. 2.34.5. The dead are laid in the public sepulchre in the most beautiful suburb of the city, in which those who fall in war are always buried; with the exception of those slain at Marathon, who for their singular and extraordinary valor were interred on the spot where they fell. 2.63.2. Besides, to recede is no longer possible, if indeed any of you in the alarm of the moment has become enamored of the honesty of such an unambitious part. For what you hold is, to speak somewhat plainly, a tyranny; to take it perhaps was wrong, but to let it go is unsafe.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, agency of humans called into question / deemphasized by Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, and passive phrases / shades of meaning Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
abstract nominal phrases in thucydides, processes suggested by Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 83
alcibiades, and athenian decision in favour of sicilian expedition Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
archaeology, abstract nominal style in Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 83
archaeology, αὐξάνω in Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
artaphernes Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
athens and athenians, exposed to forces beyond their control Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
eion Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
eretria Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
naxians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
necessity (in thucydides), and circumstances / material conditions / states of affairs Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
necessity (in thucydides), and processes Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
necessity (in thucydides), of athenian empire Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
pentecontaetia, and archaeology Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
pentecontaetia, athenians presented as purposeful in? Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
pentecontaetia, depersonalizing style in Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
quest for power, and archaeology Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 83
quest for power, as uncontrollable Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
substantivized neuter phrases, based on adjectives Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 83
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
xerxes' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 658
αὐξάνω Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 96
ἵστημι, compounds of Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 83