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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10882
Thucydides, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, 1.12.3


Βοιωτοί τε γὰρ οἱ νῦν ἑξηκοστῷ ἔτει μετὰ Ἰλίου ἅλωσιν ἐξ Ἄρνης ἀναστάντες ὑπὸ Θεσσαλῶν τὴν νῦν μὲν Βοιωτίαν, πρότερον δὲ Καδμηίδα γῆν καλουμένην ᾤκισαν ʽἦν δὲ αὐτῶν καὶ ἀποδασμὸς πρότερον ἐν τῇ γῇ ταύτῃ, ἀφ’ ὧν καὶ ἐς Ἴλιον ἐστράτευσαν̓, Δωριῆς τε ὀγδοηκοστῷ ἔτει ξὺν Ἡρακλείδαις Πελοπόννησον ἔσχον.Sixty years after the capture of Ilium the modern Boeotians were driven out of Arne by the Thessalians, and settled in the present Boeotia, the former Cadmeis; though there was a division of them there before, some of whom joined the expedition to Ilium . Twenty years later the Dorians and the Heraclids became masters of Peloponnese ; so that much had to be done


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.494-2.516, 2.676-2.679 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.495. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.496. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.497. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.498. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.499. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.500. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.501. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.502. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.503. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.504. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.505. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.506. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.507. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.508. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.509. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.510. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.511. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.512. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.513. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.514. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. And they that dwelt in Aspledon and Orchomenus of the Minyae were led by Ascalaphus and Ialmenus, sons of Ares, whom, in the palace of Actor, son of Azeus, Astyoche, the honoured maiden, conceived of mighty Ares, when she had entered into her upper chamber; 2.515. /for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho 2.516. /for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho 2.676. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.677. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.678. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.679. /Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles.
2. Tyrtaeus, Fragments, 2 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

3. Hellanicus of Lesbos, Fgrh I P. 104., None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Herodotus, Histories, 7.176, 8.43 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.176. Artemisium is where the wide Thracian sea contracts until the passage between the island of Sciathus and the mainland of Magnesia is but narrow. This strait leads next to Artemisium, which is a beach on the coast of Euboea, on which stands a temple of Artemis. ,The pass through Trachis into Hellas is fifty feet wide at its narrowest point. It is not here, however, but elsewhere that the way is narrowest, namely, in front of Thermopylae and behind it; at Alpeni, which lies behind, it is only the breadth of a cart-way, and it is the same at the Phoenix stream, near the town of Anthele. ,To the west of Thermopylae rises a high mountain, inaccessible and precipitous, a spur of Oeta; to the east of the road there is nothing but marshes and sea. In this pass are warm springs for bathing, called the Basins by the people of the country, and an altar of Heracles stands nearby. Across this entry a wall had been built, and formerly there was a gate in it. ,It was the Phocians who built it for fear of the Thessalians when these came from Thesprotia to dwell in the Aeolian land, the region which they now possess. Since the Thessalians were trying to subdue them, the Phocians made this their protection, and in their search for every means to keep the Thessalians from invading their country, they then turned the stream from the hot springs into the pass, so that it might be a watercourse. ,The ancient wall had been built long ago and most of it lay in ruins; those who built it up again thought that they would in this way bar the foreigner's way into Hellas. Very near the road is a village called Alpeni, and it is from here that the Greeks expected to obtain provisions. 8.43. The following took part in the war: from the Peloponnese, the Lacedaemonians provided sixteen ships; the Corinthians the same number as at Artemisium; the Sicyonians furnished fifteen ships, the Epidaurians ten, the Troezenians five, the Hermioneans three. All of these except the Hermioneans are Dorian and Macedonian and had last come from Erineus and Pindus and the Dryopian region. The Hermioneans are Dryopians, driven out of the country now called Doris by Herakles and the Malians.
5. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.2.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.2.3. The richest soils were always most subject to this change of masters; such as the district now called Thessaly, Boeotia, most of the Peloponnese, Arcadia excepted, and the most fertile parts of the rest of Hellas .
6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.67.6-4.67.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.67.6.  Now Aeolus took possession of the islands in the Tyrrhenian Sea which are called after him "Aeolian" and founded a city to which he gave the name Lipara; but Boeotus sailed home to Aeolus, the father of Arnê, by whom he was adopted and in succession to him he took over the kingship of Aeolis; and the land he named Arnê after his mother, but the inhabitants Boeotians after himself. 4.67.7.  And Itonus, the son of Boeotus, begat four sons, Hippalcimus, Electryon, Archilycus, and Alegenor. of these sons Hippalcimus begat Penelos, Electryon begat Leïtus, Alegenor begat Clonius, and Archilycus begat Prothoënor and Arcesilaüs, who were the leaders of all the Boeotians in the expedition against Troy.
7. Strabo, Geography, 9.2.3-9.2.4, 9.2.29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.2.3. Be that as it may, Boeotia in earlier times was inhabited by barbarians, the Aones and the Temmices, who wandered thither from Sounion, and by the Leleges and the Hyantes. Then the Phoenicians occupied it, I mean the Phoenicians with Cadmus, the man who fortified the Cadmeia and left the dominion to his descendants. Those Phoenicians founded Thebes in addition to the Cadmeia, and preserved their dominion, commanding most of the Boeotians until the expedition of the Epigoni. On this occasion they left Thebes for a short time, but came back again. And, in the same way, when they were ejected by the Thracians and the Pelasgians, they established their government in Thessaly along with the Arnaei for a long time, so that they were all called Boeotians. Then they returned to the homeland, at the time when the Aeolian fleet, near Aulis in Boeotia, was now ready to set sail, I mean the fleet which the sons of Orestes were despatching to Asia. After adding the Orchomenian country to Boeotia (for in earlier times the Orchomenians were not a part of the Boeotian community, nor did Homer enumerate them with the Boeotians, but as a separate people, for he called them Minyae), they, with the Orchomenians, drove out the Pelasgians to Athens (it was after these that a part of the city was named Pelasgicon, though they took up their abode below Hymettus), and the Thracians to Parnassus; and the Hyantes founded a city Hyas in Phocis. 9.2.4. Ephorus says that the Thracians, after making a treaty with the Boeotians, attacked them by night when they, thinking that peace had been made, were encamping rather carelessly; and when the Boeotians frustrated the Thracians, at the same time making the charge that they were breaking the treaty, the Thracians asserted that they had not broken it, for the treaty said by day, whereas they had made the attack by night; whence arose the proverb, Thracian pretense; and the Pelasgians, when the war was still going on, went to consult the oracle, as did also the Boeotians. Now Ephorus is unable, he says, to tell the oracular response that was given to the Pelasgians, but the prophetess replied to the Boeotians that they would prosper if they committed sacrilege; and the messengers who were sent to consult the oracle, suspecting that the prophetess responded thus out of favor to the Pelasgians, because of her kinship with them (indeed, the sanctuary also was from the beginning Pelasgian), seized the woman and threw her upon a burning pile, for they considered that, whether she had acted falsely or had not, they were right in either case, since, if she uttered a false oracle, she had her punishment, whereas, if she did not act falsely, they had only obeyed the order of the oracle. Now those in charge of the sanctuary, he says, did not approve of putting to death without trial — and that too in the sanctuary — the men who did this, and therefore they brought them to trial, and summoned them before the priestesses, who were also the prophetesses, being the two survivors of the three; but when the Boeotians said that it was nowhere lawful for women to act as judges, they chose an equal number of men in addition to the women. Now the men, he says, voted for acquittal, but the women for conviction, and since the votes cast were equal, those for acquittal prevailed; and in consequence of this prophecies are uttered at Dodona by men to Boeotians only; the prophetesses, however, explain the oracle to mean that the god ordered the Boeotians to steal the tripods and take one of them to Dodona every year; and they actually do this, for they always take down one of the dedicated tripods by night and cover it up with garments, and secretly, as it were, carry it to Dodona. 9.2.29. Next Homer names Coroneia, Haliartus, Plataeae, and Glissas. Now Coroneia is situated on a height near Helicon. The Boeotians took possession of it on their return from the Thessalian Arne after the Trojan War, at which time they also occupied Orchomenus. And when they got the mastery of Coroneia, they built in the plain before the city the sanctuary of the Itonian Athena, bearing the same name as the Thessalian sanctuary; and they called the river which flowed past it Cuarius, giving it the same name as the Thessalian river. But Alcaeus calls it Coralius, when he says, Athena, warrior queen, who dost keep watch o'er the cornfields of Coroneia before thy temple on the banks of the Coralius River. Here, too, the Pamboeotian Festival used to be celebrated. And for some mystic reason, as they say, a statue of Hades was dedicated along with that of Athena. Now the people in Coroneia are called Coronii, whereas those in the Messenian Coroneia are called Coronaeis.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, and social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
agamemnon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
agasikles of thebes Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 143
aiatos, father of hero thessalos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
aiolians Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
aiolos, mythic eponym of aiolians Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 38
apollo, ismenios Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 143
apollo, ptoieus/ptoios Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 143
argos, argive Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
arne, city of boiotia Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35, 38
arne (mythical home of boiotians) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
asia minor Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
athena itonia in boiotia, origin Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 93, 96
athena itonia in boiotia, relation to identity of boiotian ethnos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 96
athena itonia in thessaly, in military and political history Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35, 38
athenocentrism, sometimes misleading, autochthony vs. immigration Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
battles, koroneia 447 bc( Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 143
boeotia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
boiotoi, early invaders of thessaly Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35, 96
boiotos, eponym hero Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 38
catalogue of ships Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 96
catchment area, of cults, regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
chios Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
cyprus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
cyrene Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
dialect, aiolic Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
dialect, northwest greek Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
dialect, thessalian Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
dialect, west greek Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
dorian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
epic cycle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
festival Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
heracles Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
identity, general, ethnic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
immigrant Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
ionian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
kierion/kiarion, city of thessaliotis Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
koroneia, boiotian city Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 93, 96
laconia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
laistrygones Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
locality, cults tied to Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
massilia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, tangibility of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
memories, social, and aetiology Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
memories, social, historicity of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
messenia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
migrations, invasions, to boiotia Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35, 38, 93, 96
migrations, invasions, to thessaly Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
migrations, myths of, boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
migrations, myths of, fostered in ritual practice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
migrations, myths of, narrative framework for expression of social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
myth, of social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
myth Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
neleid Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
oral tradition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
orchomenos, boiotian city Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 96
pelasgians, in boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
peloponnese Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
performances of myth and ritual (also song), embracing social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
phthiotis, se tetrad of thessaly Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
polis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
priestess Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 143
pylos Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
sacrifice, thysia Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 143
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
sikanians Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
sikanos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 50
sinope Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
social change, and myth' Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
thessalians, migrations of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
thessalians Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
thessaloi Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35, 38
thessalos, eponym of thessalians Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
thessaly, geography Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 35
thracians, in boioita Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
thucydides, and boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 328
trapezus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 228
trojan war Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 38, 93