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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10834
Theophrastus, Characters, 16.12
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 2, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1. ἀλλ' εἴ τις ἐς Βακχεῖον αὐτὰς ἐκάλεσεν
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 139, 470, 138 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

138. ἔχων ἱερὸν ἐνδυτόν, ἀγρεύων
3. Euripides, Fragments, 953-954, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hippolytus, 953-954, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Herodotus, Histories, 1.90-1.91, 4.79 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.90. When Cyrus heard this, he was exceedingly pleased, for he believed the advice good; and praising him greatly, and telling his guard to act as Croesus had advised, he said: “Croesus, now that you, a king, are determined to act and to speak with integrity, ask me directly for whatever favor you like.” ,“Master,” said Croesus, “you will most gratify me if you will let me send these chains of mine to that god of the Greeks whom I especially honored and to ask him if it is his way to deceive those who serve him well.” When Cyrus asked him what grudge against the god led him to make this request, ,Croesus repeated to him the story of all his own aspirations, and the answers of the oracles, and more particularly his offerings, and how the oracle had encouraged him to attack the Persians; and so saying he once more insistently pled that he be allowed to reproach the god for this. At this Cyrus smiled, and replied, “This I will grant you, Croesus, and whatever other favor you may ever ask me.” ,When Croesus heard this, he sent Lydians to Delphi, telling them to lay his chains on the doorstep of the temple, and to ask the god if he were not ashamed to have persuaded Croesus to attack the Persians, telling him that he would destroy Cyrus' power; of which power (they were to say, showing the chains) these were the first-fruits. They should ask this; and further, if it were the way of the Greek gods to be ungrateful. 1.91. When the Lydians came, and spoke as they had been instructed, the priestess (it is said) made the following reply. “No one may escape his lot, not even a god. Croesus has paid for the sin of his ancestor of the fifth generation before, who was led by the guile of a woman to kill his master, though he was one of the guard of the Heraclidae, and who took to himself the royal state of that master, to which he had no right. ,And it was the wish of Loxias that the evil lot of Sardis fall in the lifetime of Croesus' sons, not in his own; but he could not deflect the Fates. ,Yet as far as they gave in, he did accomplish his wish and favor Croesus: for he delayed the taking of Sardis for three years. And let Croesus know this: that although he is now taken, it is by so many years later than the destined hour. And further, Loxias saved Croesus from burning. ,But as to the oracle that was given to him, Croesus is wrong to complain concerning it. For Loxias declared to him that if he led an army against the Persians, he would destroy a great empire. Therefore he ought, if he had wanted to plan well, to have sent and asked whether the god spoke of Croesus' or of Cyrus' empire. But he did not understood what was spoken, or make further inquiry: for which now let him blame himself. ,When he asked that last question of the oracle and Loxias gave him that answer concerning the mule, even that Croesus did not understand. For that mule was in fact Cyrus, who was the son of two parents not of the same people, of whom the mother was better and the father inferior: ,for she was a Mede and the daughter of Astyages king of the Medes; but he was a Persian and a subject of the Medes and although in all respects her inferior he married this lady of his.” This was the answer of the priestess to the Lydians. They carried it to Sardis and told Croesus, and when he heard it, he confessed that the sin was not the god's, but his. And this is the story of Croesus' rule, and of the first overthrow of Ionia . 4.79. But when things had to turn out badly for him, they did so for this reason: he conceived a desire to be initiated into the rites of the Bacchic Dionysus; and when he was about to begin the sacred mysteries, he saw the greatest vision. ,He had in the city of the Borysthenites a spacious house, grand and costly (the same house I just mentioned), all surrounded by sphinxes and griffins worked in white marble; this house was struck by a thunderbolt. And though the house burnt to the ground, Scyles none the less performed the rite to the end. ,Now the Scythians reproach the Greeks for this Bacchic revelling, saying that it is not reasonable to set up a god who leads men to madness. ,So when Scyles had been initiated into the Bacchic rite, some one of the Borysthenites scoffed at the Scythians: “You laugh at us, Scythians, because we play the Bacchant and the god possesses us; but now this deity has possessed your own king, so that he plays the Bacchant and is maddened by the god. If you will not believe me, follow me now and I will show him to you.” ,The leading men among the Scythians followed him, and the Borysthenite brought them up secretly onto a tower; from which, when Scyles passed by with his company of worshippers, they saw him playing the Bacchant; thinking it a great misfortune, they left the city and told the whole army what they had seen.
6. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

782c. Ath. The custom of men sacrificing one another is, in fact, one that survives even now among many peoples; whereas amongst others we hear of how the opposite custom existed, when they were forbidden so much as to eat an ox, and their offerings to the gods consisted, not of animals, but of cakes of meal and grain steeped in honey, and other such bloodless sacrifices, and from flesh they abstained as though it were unholy to eat it or to stain with blood the altars of the gods; instead of that, those of us men who then existed lived what is called an Orphic life, keeping wholly to iimate food and
7. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Theophrastus, Characters, 16.1-16.6, 16.9, 16.11, 16.13 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

9. Plutarch, Sayings of The Spartans, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.37.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.37.5. By the image of the Mistress stands Anytus, represented as a man in armour. Those about the sanctuary say that the Mistress was brought up by Anytus, who was one of the Titans, as they are called. The first to introduce Titans into poetry was Homer, See Hom. Il. 14.279 . representing them as gods down in what is called Tartarus; the lines are in the passage about Hera's oath. From Homer the name of the Titans was taken by Onomacritus, who in the orgies he composed for Dionysus made the Titans the authors of the god's sufferings.
11. Epigraphy, Lsam, 29, 12

12. Epigraphy, Lscg, 55, 139

13. Epigraphy, Lss, 91

14. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1365



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agyrtes Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 120
animal material Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
banqueting hero reliefs Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
beans as prohibited foodstuff Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
bricoleur, bricolage Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
brimo Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
demeter/deo Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
dionysos, dionysos-bakchos Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
dionysos Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
divides year with apollo? and women Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divides year with apollo? iconographic retinue Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divides year with apollo? private rites for Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divination, not admitted in court by entrails Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 120
divination, not admitted in court individuals Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 120
dyssebes phren, eggs as prohibited foodstuff Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
eschatology, and gold leaves/orphics Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
gold leaves Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
greek literature Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
greek magic, ritual and religion Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
gurôb Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
hetaira Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 212
identity, proclamation of Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 72
initiations (private cults) Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 120, 325
justice, in gold leaves Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
katharos, in gold leaves of psyche/soul Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
kouretes Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
lamellae Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
maenads Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
mammals Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
metals Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
mother elective cults of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 120, 325
mother of the gods Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
mousaios Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
musaeus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
mystery cults, orphic Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
mystery cults Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
myth Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
offerings (including sacrifice) Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
oikos, oikia as entity active in religion Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
oikos, oikia votive reliefs depicting Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
onomacritus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
orpheotelestai Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
orpheus, as founder of mysteries and religious reformer Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
orpheus Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
orphic, life Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
orphism Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
pankrates, sanctuary of by ilissus votive reliefs from Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
persephone/kore Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
persephone Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
plato, on the orphic life Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
protective magic' Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
psyche as seat of purity/impurity, in the gold leaves Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
purification Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 72
rhea Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
sabazios Bortolani et al., William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions (2019) 49
sabazius Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
salvation, and orphism Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
scyles Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
sexual intercourse, in sanctuaries Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 212
sexual intercourse, polluting Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 212
shared with whom? Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
shower, purification and Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 212
sprinkling, lustral Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 212
theophrastus, characters, religion in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
theophrastus deisidaimonic man Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 72
theseus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
tiresias Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 120
titan Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 72
vegetarianism, and orphism Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 254
votive reliefs choice of worshippers in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
votive reliefs from asclepieum Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
votive reliefs from sanctuary of pankrates Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
votive reliefs of banqueting heroes Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 37
women and dionysus Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
women private festivals of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi and dionysus Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi private festivals of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325