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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10633
Tertullian, To Scapula, 5.1-5.2
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

34 results
1. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 32.29, 32.31 (1st cent. CE

32.31.  Who, pray, could praise a people with such a disposition? Is not that the reason why even to your own rulers you seem rather contemptible? Someone already, according to report, has expressed his opinion of you in these words: "But of the people of Alexandria what can one say, a folk to whom you need only throw plenty of bread and a ticket to the hippodrome, since they have no interest in anything else?" Why, inasmuch as, in case a leading citizen misbehaves publicly in the sight of all, you will visit him with your contempt and regard him as a worthless fellow, no matter if he has authority a thousand times as great as yours, you yourselves cannot succeed in maintaining a reputation for dignity and seriousness so long as you are guilty of like misconduct.
2. Ignatius, To Polycarp, 7.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.3. A Christian hath no authority over himself, but giveth his time to God. This is God's work, and yours also, when ye shall complete it: for I trust in the Divine grace, that ye are ready for an act of well- doing which is meet for God. Knowing the fervour of your sincerity, I have exhorted you in a short letter.
3. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 6.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.1. But if any one propound Judaism unto you, here him not: for it is better to hear Christianity from a man who is circumcised than Judaism from one uncircumcised. But if either the one or the other speak not concerning Jesus Christ, I look on them as tombstones and graves of the dead, whereon are inscribed only the names of men.
4. Ignatius, To The Ephesians, 11.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.2. Let nothing glitter in your eyes apart from Him, in whom I carry about my bonds, my spiritual pearls in which I would fain rise again through your prayer, whereof may it be my lot to be always a partaker, that I may be found in the company of those Christians of Ephesus who moreover were ever of one mind with the Apostles in the power of Jesus Christ.
5. Ignatius, To The Magnesians, 10.1, 10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.1. Therefore let us not be insensible to His goodness. For if He should imitate us according to our deeds, we are lost. For this cause, seeing that we are become His disciples, let us learn to live as beseemeth Christianity. For whoso is called by another name besides this, is not of God. 10.3. It is monstrous to talk of Jesus Christ and to practise Judaism. For Christianity did not believe in Judaism, but Judaism in Christianity, wherein every tongue believed and was gathered together unto God.
6. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 6.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.1. But if any one propound Judaism unto you, here him not: for it is better to hear Christianity from a man who is circumcised than Judaism from one uncircumcised. But if either the one or the other speak not concerning Jesus Christ, I look on them as tombstones and graves of the dead, whereon are inscribed only the names of men.
7. Ignatius, To The Romans, 3.2-3.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.2. Only pray that I may have power within and without, so that I may not only say it but also desire it; that I may not only be called a Christian, but also be found one. For if I shall be found so, then can I also be called one, and be faithful then, when I am no more visible to the world. 3.3. Nothing visible is good. For our God Jesus Christ, being in the Father, is the more plainly visible. The Work is not of persuasiveness, but Christianity is a thing of might, whensoever it is hated by the world.
8. Ignatius, To The Trallians, 6.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.1. I exhort you therefore -- yet not I, but the love of Jesus Christ -- take ye only Christian food, and abstain from strange herbage, which is heresy:
9. New Testament, 1 Peter, 1.1, 4.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the chosen ones who are living as strangers in the Dispersion in Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia 4.16. But if one of you suffers for being a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glorify God in this matter.
10. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 1.7-1.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.7. so that you became an example to all who believe in Macedonia and in Achaia. 1.8. For from you has sounded forth the word of the Lord, not only in Macedonia and Achaia, but also in every place your faith toward God has gone forth; so that we need not to say anything.
11. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 1.1, 2.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 1.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.15. This you know, that all who are in Asia turned away from me; of whom are Phygelus and Hermogenes.
13. New Testament, Acts, 11.26, 13.4, 18.12, 19.10, 23.34, 26.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.26. When he had found him, he brought him to Antioch. It happened, that even for a whole year they were gathered together with the assembly, and taught many people. The disciples were first called Christians in Antioch. 13.4. So, being sent out by the Holy Spirit, they went down to Seleucia. From there they sailed to Cyprus. 18.12. But when Gallio was proconsul of Achaia, the Jews with one accord rose up against Paul and brought him before the judgment seat 19.10. This continued for two years, so that all those who lived in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus, both Jews and Greeks. 23.34. When the governor had read it, he asked what province he was from. When he understood that he was from Cilicia, he said 26.28. Agrippa said to Paul, "With a little persuasion are you trying to make me a Christian?
14. New Testament, Luke, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.2. This was the first enrollment made when Quirinius was governor of Syria.
15. New Testament, Matthew, 4.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.24. The report about him went out into all Syria. They brought to him all who were sick, afflicted with various diseases and torments, possessed with demons, epileptics, and paralytics; and he healed them.
16. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 3.2, 10.1, 12.1-12.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.2. 2 So after this all the crowd, wondering at the nobility of the God-loving and God-fearing people of the Christians, cried out: "Away with the Atheists; let Polycarp be searched for. 10.1. 1 But when he persisted again, and said: "Swear by the genius of Caesar," he answered him: "If you vainly suppose that I will swear by the genius of Caesar, as you say, and pretend that you are ignorant who I am, listen plainly: I am a Christian. And if you wish to learn the doctrine of Christianity fix a day and listen. 12.1. 1 And with these and many other words he was filled with courage and joy, and his face was full of grace so that it not only did not fall with trouble at the things said to him, but that the Pro-Consul, on the other hand, was astounded and sent his herald into the midst of the arena to announce three times: "Polycarp has confessed that he is a Christian. 12.2. 2 When this had been said by the herald, all the multitude of heathen and Jews living in Smyrna cried out with uncontrollable wrath and a loud shout: "This is the teacher of Asia, the father of the Christians, the destroyer of our Gods, who teaches many neither to offer sacrifice nor to worship." And when they said this, they cried out and asked Philip the Asiarch to let loose a lion on Polycarp. But he said he could not legally do this, since he had closed the Sports.
17. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.21.2, 4.30.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Justin, First Apology, 4.5, 12.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 63.5, 110.5, 117.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Tertullian, To The Heathen, 1.3.2, 1.8.9-1.8.10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

24. Tertullian, To Scapula, 1.1, 1.3, 3.1, 3.3-3.5, 4.1, 5.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

25. Tertullian, Against Marcion, 1.1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Tertullian, Apology, 2.4, 2.6, 21.24, 32.1, 50.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Tertullian, On Flight In Persecution, 9.4, 12.1, 12.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

28. Tertullian, On Idolatry, 13.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

29. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 7.11 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

30. Eusebius of Caesarea, Martyrs of Palestine, 3.2-3.4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

31. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.9.1-4.9.3, 4.26.5, 5.1, 5.16.16-5.16.18, 5.16.21, 5.21, 8.2.1, 8.9.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.9.1. To Minucius Fundanus. I have received an epistle, written to me by Serennius Granianus, a most illustrious man, whom you have succeeded. It does not seem right to me that the matter should be passed by without examination, lest the men be harassed and opportunity be given to the informers for practicing villainy. 4.9.2. If, therefore, the inhabitants of the province can clearly sustain this petition against the Christians so as to give answer in a court of law, let them pursue this course alone, but let them not have resort to men's petitions and outcries. For it is far more proper, if any one wishes to make an accusation, that you should examine into it. 4.9.3. If any one therefore accuses them and shows that they are doing anything contrary to the laws, do you pass judgment according to the heinousness of the crime. But, by Hercules! If any one bring an accusation through mere calumny, decide in regard to his criminality, and see to it that you inflict punishment.Such are the contents of Hadrian's rescript. 4.26.5. But in his book addressed to the emperor he records that the following events happened to us under him: For, what never before happened, the race of the pious is now suffering persecution, being driven about in Asia by new decrees. For the shameless informers and coveters of the property of others, taking occasion from the decrees, openly carry on robbery night and day, despoiling those who are guilty of no wrong. And a little further on he says: If these things are done by your command, well and good. For a just ruler will never take unjust measures; and we indeed gladly accept the honor of such a death. 5.16.16. He says again in the same book that the holy bishops of that time attempted to refute the spirit in Maximilla, but were prevented by others who plainly co-operated with the spirit. 5.16.17. He writes as follows:And let not the spirit, in the same work of Asterius Urbanus, say through Maximilla, 'I am driven away from the sheep like a wolf. I am not a wolf. I am word and spirit and power.' But let him show clearly and prove the power in the spirit. And by the spirit let him compel those to confess him who were then present for the purpose of proving and reasoning with the talkative spirit, — those eminent men and bishops, Zoticus, from the village Comana, and Julian, from Apamea, whose mouths the followers of Themiso muzzled, refusing to permit the false and seductive spirit to be refuted by them. 5.16.18. Again in the same work, after saying other things in refutation of the false prophecies of Maximilla, he indicates the time when he wrote these accounts, and mentions her predictions in which she prophesied wars and anarchy. Their falsehood he censures in the following manner: 5.16.21. For some of the heresies have a great many martyrs; but surely we shall not on that account agree with them or confess that they hold the truth. And first, indeed, those called Marcionites, from the heresy of Marcion, say that they have a multitude of martyrs for Christ; yet they do not confess Christ himself in truth.A little farther on he continues: 8.2.1. All these things were fulfilled in us, when we saw with our own eyes the houses of prayer thrown down to the very foundations, and the Divine and Sacred Scriptures committed to the flames in the midst of the market-places, and the shepherds of the churches basely hidden here and there, and some of them captured ignominiously, and mocked by their enemies. When also, according to another prophetic word, Contempt was poured out upon rulers, and he caused them to wander in an untrodden and pathless way. 8.9.5. And we beheld the most wonderful ardor, and the truly divine energy and zeal of those who believed in the Christ of God. For as soon as sentence was pronounced against the first, one after another rushed to the judgment seat, and confessed themselves Christians. And regarding with indifference the terrible things and the multiform tortures, they declared themselves boldly and undauntedly for the religion of the God of the universe. And they received the final sentence of death with joy and laughter and cheerfulness; so that they sang and offered up hymns and thanksgivings to the God of the universe till their very last breath.
32. Origen, Against Celsus, 8.65-8.66 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.65. Moreover, we are to despise ingratiating ourselves with kings or any other men, not only if their favour is to be won by murders, licentiousness, or deeds of cruelty, but even if it involves impiety towards God, or any servile expressions of flattery and obsequiousness, which things are unworthy of brave and high-principled men, who aim at joining with their other virtues that highest of virtues, patience and fortitude. But while we do nothing which is contrary to the law and word of God, we are not so mad as to stir up against us the wrath of kings and princes, which will bring upon us sufferings and tortures, or even death. For we read: Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God. Whosoever therefore resists the power, resists the ordice of God. These words we have in our exposition of the Epistle to the Romans, to the best of our ability, explained at length, and with various applications; but for the present we have taken them in their more obvious and generally received acceptation, to meet the saying of Celsus, that it is not without the power of demons that kings have been raised to their regal dignity. Here much might be said on the constitution of kings and rulers, for the subject is a wide one, embracing such rulers as reign cruelly and tyrannically, and such as make the kingly office the means of indulging in luxury and sinful pleasures. We shall therefore, for the present, pass over the full consideration of this subject. We will, however, never swear by the fortune of the king, nor by ought else that is considered equivalent to God. For if the word fortune is nothing but an expression for the uncertain course of events, as some say, although they seem not to be agreed, we do not swear by that as God which has no existence, as though it did really exist and was able to do something, lest we should bind ourselves by an oath to things which have no existence. If, on the other hand (as is thought by others, who say that to swear by the fortune of the king of the Romans is to swear by his demon), what is called the fortune of the king is in the power of demons, then in that case we must die sooner than swear by a wicked and treacherous demon, that ofttimes sins along with the man of whom it gains possession, and sins even more than he. 8.66. Then Celsus, following the example of those who are under the influence of demons- at one time recovering, at another relapsing, as though he were again becoming sensible - says: If, however, any worshipper of God should be ordered to do anything impious, or to say anything base, such a command should in no way be regarded; but we must encounter all kinds of torment, or submit to any kind of death, rather than say or even think anything unworthy of God. Again, however, from ignorance of our principles, and in entire confusion of thought, he says: But if any one commands you to celebrate the sun, or to sing a joyful triumphal song in praise of Minerva, you will by celebrating their praises seem to render the higher praise to God; for piety, in extending to all things, becomes more perfect. To this our answer is, that we do not wait for any command to celebrate the praises of the sun; for we have been taught to speak well not only of those creatures that are obedient to the will of God, but even of our enemies. We therefore praise the sun as the glorious workmanship of God, which obeys His laws and hearkens to the call, Praise the Lord, sun and moon, and with all your powers show forth the praises of the Father and Creator of all. Minerva, however, whom Celsus classes with the sun, is the subject of various Grecian myths, whether these contain any hidden meaning or not. They say that Minerva sprang fully armed from the brain of Jupiter; that when she was pursued by Vulcan, she fled from him to preserve her honour; and that from the seed which fell to the ground in the heat of Vulcan's passion, there grew a child whom Minerva brought up and called Erichthonius, That owed his nurture to the blue-eyed maid, But from the teeming furrow took his birth, The mighty offspring of the foodful earth. It is therefore evident, that if we admit Minerva the daughter of Jupiter, we must also admit many fables and fictions which can be allowed by no one who discards fables and seeks after truth.
33. John Malalas, History, 11.10 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

34. Pseudo-Tertullian, Martyrdom of Perpetua And Felicitas, 2.1, 4.3-4.6, 5.6, 6.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(p. de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
acta martyrum ix Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 171
acts of martyrs (acta martyrum) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
alexander, doctor from phrygia de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
alexander (martyr at lugdunum) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 172
alexandria (egypt) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
anonymous (anti-montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6
antonines de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
antoninus pius, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
arrius antoninus Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 190, 210, 231, 257
asia, province de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131, 167
asia (roman province), montanism Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 231
asia (roman province) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 190, 231, 257
asia minor Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 231
aspasius paternus (proconsul) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 257
aurelian, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
caesarea (palestine) de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131
callistus, pope de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
christian citizenship Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
christianity/christians, persecution Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
decius, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
diocletian Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
domitian, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
egypt, egyptians de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131
egyptian martyrs de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131
epagethus, vettius de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
eusebius of caesarea, church father Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
eusebius of caesarea de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131
exaggerations de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131, 167
faith/the faith Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 231
galatarches, president of the commonalty of galatia Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
games de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131
governors' attitudes" "554.0_131.0@governors' attitudes" de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
governors' attitudes" '554.0_132.0@influence on martyrs de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
heresy named after founder Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
herod the great de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
hippolytus de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
ignatios of antioch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
ignatius of antioch de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
josephus de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
justin martyr Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
lactantius, christian writer Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
lyons de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
macabees de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
marcus aurelius Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 829; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 172
martyrdom, and role of roman authorities Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 23
martyrdom, defined, voluntary vs. mandated Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg, Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity (2023) 436
martyrdom, greco-roman models Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 818
martyrdom/martyrs Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6, 172, 190, 210, 231
martyrdom Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 818
martyrs/martyrdom Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
martyrs de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
mavilus of hadrumetum Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 190
maximian, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
maximian (emperor) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 210
maximilla Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6
maximinus daia, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
minucius fundanus Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 171
montanists de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
neolithic/chalcolithic age (ca. Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
nero, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
new testament Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
oracles/sayings logia (montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6
palestine de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131
pantainos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
paul, and thecla Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 23
perpetua Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 231
persecutions Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6, 171, 172, 190, 257
persecutions of christians Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
phrygia, montanism in Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6
phrygia Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6, 210
pliny, letter to trajan on christians Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 829
pliny the younger Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 171
polycarp of smyrna, bishop and martyr Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
punishments of de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
reciprocity, for good actions Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 23
right of accused to trial Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 829
roman/byzantine empire Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6
roman empire, governor and crowds Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 829
roman empire, petitions Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 829
roman empire, unity of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
roman empire as a unit Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178
sardinia de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
saturus Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 231
scapula Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 190
septimus severus Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
slavery, slaves de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
synagogues de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 167
tattoo Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 6
tertullian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 178; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 190, 231, 257; de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131, 167
thebaid de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131
thecla, and paul Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 23
thecla, and the governor Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 23
traja Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 171
trajan, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
trajan de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 132
valerian, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 536
voluntary martyrdom ix, xxxvi' Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 190
voluntary martyrdom ix, xxxvi Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 171, 172, 210, 231, 257
volunteer martyrs de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 131, 132, 167