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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10633
Tertullian, To Scapula, 4.8
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 71.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2. Tertullian, To Scapula, 1.1, 4.7, 5.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 5.5.1-5.5.4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

5.5.1. It is reported that Marcus Aurelius Caesar, brother of Antoninus, being about to engage in battle with the Germans and Sarmatians, was in great trouble on account of his army suffering from thirst. But the soldiers of the so-called Melitene legion, through the faith which has given strength from that time to the present, when they were drawn up before the enemy, kneeled on the ground, as is our custom in prayer, and engaged in supplications to God. 5.5.2. This was indeed a strange sight to the enemy, but it is reported that a stranger thing immediately followed. The lightning drove the enemy to flight and destruction, but a shower refreshed the army of those who had called on God, all of whom had been on the point of perishing with thirst. 5.5.3. This story is related by non-Christian writers who have been pleased to treat the times referred to, and it has also been recorded by our own people. By those historians who were strangers to the faith, the marvel is mentioned, but it is not acknowledged as an answer to our prayers. But by our own people, as friends of the truth, the occurrence is related in a simple and artless manner. 5.5.4. Among these is Apolinarius, who says that from that time the legion through whose prayers the wonder took place received from the emperor a title appropriate to the event, being called in the language of the Romans the Thundering Legion.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
africa proconsularis (north africa) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
apollinarius of hierapolis Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
cassius dio Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
imperial cult Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
legio xii fulminata Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
marcus aurelius (emperor) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
martyrdom/martyrs Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
mauretania Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
mavilus of hadrumetum Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
numidia (algeria) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
persecutions' Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
prayer Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
quadi Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
rain / lightning miracle Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233
roman/byzantine empire Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
scapula Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
tertullian Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233; Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 191
victory, military Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 233