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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10655
Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 32
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Ignatius, To The Ephesians, 21.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21.1. I am devoted to you and to those whom for the honour of God ye sent to Smyrna; whence also I write unto you with thanksgiving to the Lord, having love for Polycarp as I have for you also. Remember me, even as I would that Jesus Christ may also remember you.
2. Mishnah, Berachot, 5.5 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.5. One who is praying and makes a mistake, it is a bad sign for him. And if he is the messenger of the congregation (the prayer leader) it is a bad sign for those who have sent him, because one’s messenger is equivalent to one’s self. They said about Rabbi Hanina ben Dosa that he used to pray for the sick and say, “This one will die, this one will live.” They said to him: “How do you know?” He replied: “If my prayer comes out fluently, I know that he is accepted, but if not, then I know that he is rejected.”"
3. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 3.2, 11.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.2. I fed you with milk, not withmeat; for you weren't yet ready. Indeed, not even now are you ready 11.19. For there also mustbe factions among you, that those who are approved may be revealedamong you.
4. New Testament, 2 Peter, 2.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.1. But there also arose false prophets among the people, as among you also there will be false teachers, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies, denying even the Master who bought them, bringing on themselves swift destruction.
5. New Testament, Acts, 20.9-20.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20.9. A certain young man named Eutychus sat in the window, weighed down with deep sleep. As Paul spoke still longer, being weighed down by his sleep, he fell down from the third story, and was taken up dead. 20.10. Paul went down, and fell on him, and embracing him said, "Don't be troubled, for his life is in him. 20.11. When he had gone up, and had broken bread, and eaten, and had talked with them a long while, even until break of day, he departed. 20.12. They brought the boy alive, and were not a little comforted.
6. New Testament, Mark, 9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. New Testament, Matthew, 7.15, 13.29, 16.18-16.19, 24.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7.15. Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly are ravening wolves. 13.29. But he said, 'No, lest perhaps while you gather up the darnel, you root up the wheat with them. 16.18. I also tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my assembly, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. 16.19. I will give to you the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven. 24.11. Many false prophets will arise, and will lead many astray.
8. Polycarp of Smyrna, Letter To The Philippians, 3.1-3.2, 4.1-4.3, 5.3, 6.1, 11.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 2.2, 16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2. 2 For who would not admire their nobility and patience and love of their Master? For some were torn by scourging until the mechanism of their flesh was seen even to the lower veins and arteries, and they endured so that even the bystanders pitied them and mourned. And some even reached such a pitch of nobility that none of them groaned or wailed, showing to all of us that at that hour of their torture the noble martyrs of Christ were absent from the flesh, or rather that the Lord was standing by and talking with them. 16.2. 2 And of the elect was he indeed one, the wonderful martyr, Polycarp, who in our days was an apostolic and prophetic teacher, bishop of the Catholic Church in Smyrna. For every word which he uttered from his mouth both was fulfilled and will be fulfilled.
10. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.9.5, 3.2, 3.2.1-3.2.2, 3.3.2-3.3.4, 3.4.3, 5.20 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.20. Herodotus, then, asserts that Hercules, when driving the oxen of Geryon from Erytheia, came into Scythia, and that, being wearied with travel-ling, he retired into some desert spot and slept for a short time. But while he slumbered his horse disappeared, seated on which he had performed his lengthened journey. On being aroused from repose, he, however, instituted a diligent search through the desert, endeavouring to discover his horse. And though he is unsuccessful in his search after the horse, he yet finds in the desert a certain damsel, half of whose form was that of woman, and proceeded to question her if she had seen the horse anywhere. The girl, however, replies that she had seen (the animal), but that she would not show him unless Hercules previously would come along with her for the purpose of sexual intercourse. Now Herodotus informs us that her upper parts as far as the groin were those of a virgin, but that everything below the body after the groin presented some horrible appearance of a snake. In anxiety, however, for the discovery of his horse, Hercules complies with the monster's request; for he knew her (carnally), and made her pregt. And he foretold, after coition, that she had by him in her womb three children at the same time, who were destined to become illustrious. And he ordered that she, on bringing forth, should impose on the children as soon as born the following names: Agathyrsus, Gelonus, and Scytha. And as the reward of this (favour) receiving his horse from the beast-like damsel, he went on his way, taking with him the cattle also. But after these (details), Herodotus has a protracted account; adieu, however, to it for the present. But what the opinions are of Justinus, who transfers this legend into (his account of) the generation of the universe, we shall explain.
11. Tertullian, On Baptism, 17 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

17. For concluding our brief subject, it remains to put you in mind also of the due observance of giving and receiving baptism. of giving it, the chief priest (who is the bishop) has the right: in the next place, the presbyters and deacons, yet not without the bishop's authority, on account of the honour of the Church, which being preserved, peace is preserved. Beside these, even laymen have the right; for what is equally received can be equally given. Unless bishops, or priests, or deacons, be on the spot, other disciples are called i.e. to the work. The word of the Lord ought not to be hidden by any: in like manner, too, baptism, which is equally God's property, can be administered by all. But how much more is the rule of reverence and modesty incumbent on laymen- seeing that these powers belong to their superiors - lest they assume to themselves the specific function of the bishop! Emulation of the episcopal office is the mother of schisms. The most holy apostle has said, that all things are lawful, but not all expedient. Let it suffice assuredly, in cases of necessity, to avail yourself (of that rule, if at any time circumstance either of place, or of time, or of person compels you (so to do); for then the steadfast courage of the succourer, when the situation of the endangered one is urgent, is exceptionally admissible; inasmuch as he will be guilty of a human creature's loss if he shall refrain from bestowing what he had free liberty to bestow. But the woman of pertness, who has usurped the power to teach, will of course not give birth for herself likewise to a right of baptizing, unless some new beast shall arise like the former; so that, just as the one abolished baptism, so some other should in her own right confer it! But if the writings which wrongly go under Paul's name, claim Thecla's example as a licence for women's teaching and baptizing, let them know that, in Asia, the presbyter who composed that writing, as if he were augmenting Paul's fame from his own store, after being convicted, and confessing that he had done it from love of Paul, was removed from his office. For how credible would it seem, that he who has not permitted a woman even to learn with over-boldness, should give a female the power of teaching and of baptizing! Let them be silent, he says, and at home consult their own husbands. 1 Corinthians 14:34-35
12. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 21-24, 26-27, 29-31, 33-34, 36-37, 42, 18 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

13. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.25.6, 3.36.1, 3.36.10, 4.14.2-4.14.4, 4.14.6, 4.22.3-4.22.5, 5.5.8, 5.15, 5.16.7, 5.20.4-5.20.8, 5.24.4, 5.24.16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.25.6. It is confirmed likewise by Caius, a member of the Church, who arose under Zephyrinus, bishop of Rome. He, in a published disputation with Proclus, the leader of the Phrygian heresy, speaks as follows concerning the places where the sacred corpses of the aforesaid apostles are laid: 3.36.1. At that time Polycarp, a disciple of the apostles, was a man of eminence in Asia, having been entrusted with the episcopate of the church of Smyrna by those who had seen and heard the Lord. 3.36.10. These things he wrote from the above-mentioned city to the churches referred to. And when he had left Smyrna he wrote again from Troas to the Philadelphians and to the church of Smyrna; and particularly to Polycarp, who presided over the latter church. And since he knew him well as an apostolic man, he commended to him, like a true and good shepherd, the flock at Antioch, and besought him to care diligently for it. 4.14.2. And the same writer gives another account of Polycarp which I feel constrained to add to that which has been already related in regard to him. The account is taken from the third book of Irenaeus' work Against Heresies, and is as follows: 4.22.3. And when I had come to Rome I remained there until Anicetus, whose deacon was Eleutherus. And Anicetus was succeeded by Soter, and he by Eleutherus. In every succession, and in every city that is held which is preached by the law and the prophets and the Lord. 4.22.4. The same author also describes the beginnings of the heresies which arose in his time, in the following words: And after James the Just had suffered martyrdom, as the Lord had also on the same account, Symeon, the son of the Lord's uncle, Clopas, was appointed the next bishop. All proposed him as second bishop because he was a cousin of the Lord.Therefore, they called the Church a virgin, for it was not yet corrupted by vain discourses. 4.22.5. But Thebuthis, because he was not made bishop, began to corrupt it. He also was sprung from the seven sects among the people, like Simon, from whom came the Simonians, and Cleobius, from whom came the Cleobians, and Dositheus, from whom came the Dositheans, and Gorthaeus, from whom came the Goratheni, and Masbotheus, from whom came the Masbothaeans. From them sprang the Medrianists, and Marcionists, and Carpocratians, and Valentinians, and Basilidians, and Saturnilians. Each introduced privately and separately his own peculiar opinion. From them came false Christs, false prophets, false apostles, who divided the unity of the Church by corrupt doctrines uttered against God and against his Christ. 5.5.8. Pothinus having died with the other martyrs in Gaul at ninety years of age, Irenaeus succeeded him in the episcopate of the church at Lyons. We have learned that, in his youth, he was a hearer of Polycarp. 5.16.7. There is said to be a certain village called Ardabau in that part of Mysia, which borders upon Phrygia. There first, they say, when Gratus was proconsul of Asia, a recent convert, Montanus by name, through his unquenchable desire for leadership, gave the adversary opportunity against him. And he became beside himself, and being suddenly in a sort of frenzy and ecstasy, he raved, and began to babble and utter strange things, prophesying in a manner contrary to the constant custom of the Church handed down by tradition from the beginning. 5.20.4. In the letter to Florinus, of which we have spoken, Irenaeus mentions again his intimacy with Polycarp, saying:These doctrines, O Florinus, to speak mildly, are not of sound judgment. These doctrines disagree with the Church, and drive into the greatest impiety those who accept them. These doctrines, not even the heretics outside of the Church, have ever dared to publish. These doctrines, the presbyters who were before us, and who were companions of the apostles, did not deliver to you. 5.20.5. For when I was a boy, I saw you in lower Asia with Polycarp, moving in splendor in the royal court, and endeavoring to gain his approbation. 5.20.6. I remember the events of that time more clearly than those of recent years. For what boys learn, growing with their mind, becomes joined with it; so that I am able to describe the very place in which the blessed Polycarp sat as he discoursed, and his goings out and his comings in, and the manner of his life, and his physical appearance, and his discourses to the people, and the accounts which he gave of his intercourse with John and with the others who had seen the Lord. And as he remembered their words, and what he heard from them concerning the Lord, and concerning his miracles and his teaching, having received them from eyewitnesses of the 'Word of life,' Polycarp related all things in harmony with the Scriptures. 5.20.7. These things being told me by the mercy of God, I listened to them attentively, noting them down, not on paper, but in my heart. And continually, through God's grace, I recall them faithfully. And I am able to bear witness before God that if that blessed and apostolic presbyter had heard any such thing, he would have cried out, and stopped his ears, and as was his custom, would have exclaimed, O good God, unto what times have you spared me that I should endure these things? And he would have fled from the place where, sitting or standing, he had heard such words. 5.20.8. And this can be shown plainly from the letters which he sent, either to the neighboring churches for their confirmation, or to some of the brethren, admonishing and exhorting them. Thus far Irenaeus. 5.24.4. And Polycarp in Smyrna, who was a bishop and martyr; and Thraseas, bishop and martyr from Eumenia, who fell asleep in Smyrna. 5.24.16. And when the blessed Polycarp was at Rome in the time of Anicetus, and they disagreed a little about certain other things, they immediately made peace with one another, not caring to quarrel over this matter. For neither could Anicetus persuade Polycarp not to observe what he had always observed with John the disciple of our Lord, and the other apostles with whom he had associated; neither could Polycarp persuade Anicetus to observe it as he said that he ought to follow the customs of the presbyters that had preceded him.
14. Origen, Homilies On Luke, 1 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Homilies, 2.24 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of paul Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
age, youth Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
alexandria Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
antioch Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
apelles Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
apocrypha Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
apostle, paul Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
apostle Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
apostles Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
authenticity Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
authority Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
biography (lives) Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
bishop Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
cathedra Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
christ, and authority Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
church Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
clement, first (clement of rome) Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
clement Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
collection of letters Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
community Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
cyprian Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
deacon/deaconess Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
death Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
demosthenes Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
dionysius of corinth Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
disciple, john, son of zebedee Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
divine being, muses Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
epigram Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
episcopal Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
episkopos Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
eusebius (of caesarea) Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
forgery Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
fragment Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
gelasius i Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
gospels, reference to Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
greek Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
hegesippus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
heresy, catholic christianity, heretics Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 536
heresy, rabbinic judaism, use of minim for all opponents Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 536
heretics see also donatists manichaeans, tertullians scriptural interpretation against Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
hermogenes Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
ignatius of antioch Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46; Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
interpolation Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
irenaeus of lyon Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
irenaeus of lyons Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
isocrates Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
jesus Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
justin martyr Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
luke (evangelist) Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
magisterial authority Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
marcion Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437; Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
martyrdom Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
martyrdom of paul Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
milk Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
minim, use for all opponents of rabbinic judaism' Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 536
montanus Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 536
nero Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
origen Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
patroclus Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
paul, death of Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
paul Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46, 216; Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
paul (apostle) Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
peter, as model Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 97
peter (apostle) Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
philippi, christian community Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
philippi Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
philosopher Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
polycarp Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178; Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
popes (roman), anacletus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 216
popes (roman), anicetus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
popes (roman), linus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 216
presbyter/πρεσβύτερος Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97
primacy Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
prophecy Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
pseudepigraphy Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
religion passim, sacrifice Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
repetition Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
rhetoric, declamation Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
rhetoric, second sophistic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
rhetorician Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
rome Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
saint Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
sender Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
simon magus Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 536
smyrna Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
spirit, divine Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 212
tertullian, adversus hermogenem Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
tertullian, de praescriptione haereticorum Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
tertullian, scriptural interpretation against heretics Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
tertullian Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 216; Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178; Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
transmission (of text) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
tropaia Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
unity/disunity Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 178
valentinus Yates and Dupont, The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE) (2020) 96
vatican hill Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
veneration Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 437
via appia Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
virgin Ogereau, Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century (2023) 97