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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10655
Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 21.7
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. New Testament, Philippians, 2.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.4. each of you not just looking to his own things, but each of you also to the things of others.
2. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 1.2, 5.1, 8.1, 19.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.2. 2 For he waited to be betrayed as also the Lord had done, that we too might become his imitators, "not thinking of ourselves alone, but also of our neighbours." For it is the mark of true and steadfast love, not to wish that oneself may be saved alone, but all the brethren also. 5.1. 1 But the most wonderful Polycarp, when he first heard it, was not disturbed, but wished to remain in the city; but the majority persuaded him to go away quietly, and he went out quietly to a farm, not far distant from the city, and stayed with a few friends, doing nothing but pray night and day for all, and for the Churches throughout the world, as was his custom. 8.1. 1 Now when he had at last finished his prayer, after remembering all who had ever even come his way, both small and great, high and low, and the whole Catholic Church throughout the world, the hour came for departure, and they set him on an ass, and led him into the city, on a "great Sabbath day. 19.1. 1 Such was the lot of the blessed Polycarp, who though he was, together with those from Philadelphia, the twelfth martyr in Smyrna, is alone especially remembered by all, so that he is spoken of in every place, even by the heathen. He was not only a famous teacher, but also a notable martyr, whose martyrdom all desire to imitate, for it followed the Gospel of Christ.
3. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.3.2-3.3.3, 3.12.5, 3.14.2, 4.33.8, 5.33.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 7.10-7.11, 20.4-20.9, 21.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.25.8, 4.23.1, 4.23.10, 5.24.2-5.24.6, 5.24.11-5.24.17, 5.25 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.25.8. And that they both suffered martyrdom at the same time is stated by Dionysius, bishop of Corinth, in his epistle to the Romans, in the following words: You have thus by such an admonition bound together the planting of Peter and of Paul at Rome and Corinth. For both of them planted and likewise taught us in our Corinth. And they taught together in like manner in Italy, and suffered martyrdom at the same time. I have quoted these things in order that the truth of the history might be still more confirmed. 4.23.1. And first we must speak of Dionysius, who was appointed bishop of the church in Corinth, and communicated freely of his inspired labors not only to his own people, but also to those in foreign lands, and rendered the greatest service to all in the catholic epistles which he wrote to the churches. 4.23.10. For from the beginning it has been your practice to do good to all the brethren in various ways, and to send contributions to many churches in every city. Thus relieving the want of the needy, and making provision for the brethren in the mines by the gifts which you have sent from the beginning, you Romans keep up the hereditary customs of the Romans, which your blessed bishop Soter has not only maintained, but also added to, furnishing an abundance of supplies to the saints, and encouraging the brethren from abroad with blessed words, as a loving father his children. 5.24.2. We observe the exact day; neither adding, nor taking away. For in Asia also great lights have fallen asleep, which shall rise again on the day of the Lord's coming, when he shall come with glory from heaven, and shall seek out all the saints. Among these are Philip, one of the twelve apostles, who fell asleep in Hierapolis; and his two aged virgin daughters, and another daughter, who lived in the Holy Spirit and now rests at Ephesus; and, moreover, John, who was both a witness and a teacher, who reclined upon the bosom of the Lord, and, being a priest, wore the sacerdotal plate. 5.24.3. He fell asleep at Ephesus. 5.24.4. And Polycarp in Smyrna, who was a bishop and martyr; and Thraseas, bishop and martyr from Eumenia, who fell asleep in Smyrna. 5.24.5. Why need I mention the bishop and martyr Sagaris who fell asleep in Laodicea, or the blessed Papirius, or Melito, the Eunuch who lived altogether in the Holy Spirit, and who lies in Sardis, awaiting the episcopate from heaven, when he shall rise from the dead? 5.24.6. All these observed the fourteenth day of the passover according to the Gospel, deviating in no respect, but following the rule of faith. And I also, Polycrates, the least of you all, do according to the tradition of my relatives, some of whom I have closely followed. For seven of my relatives were bishops; and I am the eighth. And my relatives always observed the day when the people put away the leaven. 5.24.11. Among them was Irenaeus, who, sending letters in the name of the brethren in Gaul over whom he presided, maintained that the mystery of the resurrection of the Lord should be observed only on the Lord's day. He fittingly admonishes Victor that he should not cut off whole churches of God which observed the tradition of an ancient custom and after many other words he proceeds as follows: 5.24.12. For the controversy is not only concerning the day, but also concerning the very manner of the fast. For some think that they should fast one day, others two, yet others more; some, moreover, count their day as consisting of forty hours day and night. 5.24.13. And this variety in its observance has not originated in our time; but long before in that of our ancestors. It is likely that they did not hold to strict accuracy, and thus formed a custom for their posterity according to their own simplicity and peculiar mode. Yet all of these lived none the less in peace, and we also live in peace with one another; and the disagreement in regard to the fast confirms the agreement in the faith. 5.24.14. He adds to this the following account, which I may properly insert:Among these were the presbyters before Soter, who presided over the church which you now rule. We mean Anicetus, and Pius, and Hyginus, and Telesphorus, and Xystus. They neither observed it themselves, nor did they permit those after them to do so. And yet though not observing it, they were none the less at peace with those who came to them from the parishes in which it was observed; although this observance was more opposed to those who did not observe it. 5.24.15. But none were ever cast out on account of this form; but the presbyters before you who did not observe it, sent the eucharist to those of other parishes who observed it. 5.24.16. And when the blessed Polycarp was at Rome in the time of Anicetus, and they disagreed a little about certain other things, they immediately made peace with one another, not caring to quarrel over this matter. For neither could Anicetus persuade Polycarp not to observe what he had always observed with John the disciple of our Lord, and the other apostles with whom he had associated; neither could Polycarp persuade Anicetus to observe it as he said that he ought to follow the customs of the presbyters that had preceded him. 5.24.17. But though matters were in this shape, they communed together, and Anicetus conceded the administration of the eucharist in the church to Polycarp, manifestly as a mark of respect. And they parted from each other in peace, both those who observed, and those who did not, maintaining the peace of the whole church.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
barnabas, letter of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
bible Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
christianity / christians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
church Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
city, symbolic city Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
dialectic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
dionysios of corinth Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
eusebios Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
faith Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
gnostics Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
hegesippos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
heresy /\u2009heretics Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
ignatios of antioch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
irenaeus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
jerusalem Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
jews Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
paul Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
platonism / platonic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
polykarpos of smyrna Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
polykrates of ephesos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
providence (pronoia) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
roman church Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
tertullian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 207
theophilos of caesarea Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
victor, bishop of rome Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
vienne and lugdunum, letter from' Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203