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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10640
Tertullian, On The Soul, 50
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 5.24 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5.24. וַיִּתְהַלֵּךְ חֲנוֹךְ אֶת־הָאֱלֹהִים וְאֵינֶנּוּ כִּי־לָקַח אֹתוֹ אֱלֹהִים׃ 5.24. And Enoch walked with God, and he was not; for God took him."
2. Democritus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Zechariah, 4.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.3. וּשְׁנַיִם זֵיתִים עָלֶיהָ אֶחָד מִימִין הַגֻּלָּה וְאֶחָד עַל־שְׂמֹאלָהּ׃ 4.3. and two olive-trees by it, one upon the right side of the bowl, and the other upon the left side thereof.’"
4. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

114d. Now it would not be fitting for a man of sense to maintain that all this is just as I have described it, but that this or something like it is true concerning our souls and their abodes, since the soul is shown to be immortal, I think he may properly and worthily venture to believe; for the venture is well worth while; and he ought to repeat such things to himself as if they were magic charms, which is the reason why I have been lengthening out the story so long. This then is why a man should be of good cheer about his soul, who in his life
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Eternity of The World, 135, 134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

134. And these men appear to be ignorant of the manner in which they are produced, since if they had not been, perhaps they would have been silent out of shame; but still there is no reason why we should not teach them; but there is nothing new in what is now said, neither are they our words but the ancient sayings of wise men, by whom nothing which was necessary for knowledge has been left uninvestigated;
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.141.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.345 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.345. But we who are the followers and disciples of the prophet Moses, will never abandon our investigation into the nature of the true God; looking upon the knowledge of him as the true end of happiness; and thinking that the true everlasting life, as the law says, {49}{#de 4:4.} is to live in obedience to and worship of God; in which precept it gives us a most important and philosophical lesson; for in real truth those who are atheists are dead as to their souls, but those who are marshalled in the ranks of the true living God, as his servants, enjoy an everlasting Life.{50}{yonge's translation includes a separate treatise title at this point: On the Commandment that the Wages of a Harlot Are Not To Be Received in the Sacred Treasury.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

20. but they take up their abode outside of walls, or gardens, or solitary lands, seeking for a desert place, not because of any ill-natured misanthropy to which they have learnt to devote themselves, but because of the associations with people of wholly dissimilar dispositions to which they would otherwise be compelled, and which they know to be unprofitable and mischievous. III.
9. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.32, 1.38, 1.42, 1.90, 1.106 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.32. And we must consider that the man who was formed of earth, means the mind which is to be infused into the body, but which has not yet been so infused. And this mind would be really earthly and corruptible, if it were not that God had breathed into it the spirit of genuine life; for then it "exists," and is no longer made into a soul; and its soul is not inactive, and incapable of proper formation, but a really intellectual and living one. "For man," says Moses, "became a living soul." XIII. 1.38. Since how could the soul have perceived God if he had not inspired it, and touched it according to his power? For human intellect would not have dared to mount up to such a height as to lay claim to the nature of God, if God himself had not drawn it up to himself, as far as it was possible for the mind of man to be drawn up, and if he had not formed it according to those powers which can be comprehended. 1.42. and Moses has used the word "breath," not "spirit," as there is a difference between the two words; for spirit is conceived of according to strength, and intensity, and power; but breath is a gentle and moderate kind of breeze and exhalation; therefore the mind, which was created in accordance with the image and idea of God, may be justly said to partake in his spirit, for its reasoning has strength: but that which is derived from matter is only a partaker in a thin and very light air, being as it were a sort of exhalation, such as arises from spices; for they, although they be preserved intact, and are not exposed to fire or fumigation, do nevertheless emit a certain fragrance. XIV. 1.90. And the Lord God commanded Adam, saying, of every tree that is in the Paradise thou mayest freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil ye shall not eat; but in the day on which ye eat of it ye shall die the death." A question may arise here to what kind of Adam he gave this command and who, this Adam was. For Moses has not made any mention of him before; but now is the first time that he has named him. Are we then to think that he is desirous to supply you with the name of the factitious man? "And he calls him," continues Moses, "Earth." For this is the interpretation of the name of Adam. Accordingly, when you hear the name Adam, you must think that he is an earthly and perishable being; for he is made according to an image, being not earthly but heavenly. 1.106. and consequently God calls that not merely "to die," but "to die the death;" showing that he is speaking not of common death, but of that peculiar and especial death which is the death of the soul, buried in its passions and in all kinds of evil. And we may almost say that one kind of death is opposed to the other kind. For the one is the separation of what was previously existing in combination, namely, of body and soul. But this other death, on the contrary, is a combination of them both, the inferior one, the body, having the predomice, and the superior one, the soul, being made subject to it.
10. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 3.372, 7.340-7.350 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.372. The bodies of all men are indeed mortal, and are created out of corruptible matter; but the soul is ever immortal, and is a portion of the divinity that inhabits our bodies. Besides, if anyone destroys or abuses a depositum he hath received from a mere man, he is esteemed a wicked and perfidious person; but then if anyone cast out of his body this Divine depositum, can we imagine that he who is thereby affronted does not know of it. 7.341. So he made a lamentable groan, and fixing his eyes intently on those that wept, he spake thus:—“Truly, I was greatly mistaken when I thought to be assisting to brave men who struggled hard for their liberty, and to such as were resolved either to live with honor, or else to die; 7.342. but I find that you are such people as are no better than others, either in virtue or in courage, and are afraid of dying, though you be delivered thereby from the greatest miseries, while you ought to make no delay in this matter, nor to await anyone to give you good advice; 7.343. for the laws of our country, and of God himself, have from ancient times, and as soon as ever we could use our reason, continually taught us, and our forefathers have corroborated the same doctrine by their actions, and by their bravery of mind, that it is life that is a calamity to men, and not death; 7.344. for this last affords our souls their liberty, and sends them by a removal into their own place of purity, where they are to be insensible of all sorts of misery; for while souls are tied down to a mortal body, they are partakers of its miseries; and really, to speak the truth, they are themselves dead; for the union of what is divine to what is mortal is disagreeable. 7.345. It is true, the power of the soul is great, even when it is imprisoned in a mortal body; for by moving it after a way that is invisible, it makes the body a sensible instrument, and causes it to advance further in its actions than mortal nature could otherwise do. 7.346. However, when it is freed from that weight which draws it down to the earth and is connected with it, it obtains its own proper place, and does then become a partaker of that blessed power, and those abilities, which are then every way incapable of being hindered in their operations. It continues invisible, indeed, to the eyes of men, as does God himself; 7.347. for certainly it is not itself seen while it is in the body; for it is there after an invisible manner, and when it is freed from it, it is still not seen. It is this soul which hath one nature, and that an incorruptible one also; but yet it is the cause of the change that is made in the body; 7.348. for whatsoever it be which the soul touches, that lives and flourishes; and from whatsoever it is removed, that withers away and dies; such a degree is there in it of immortality. 7.349. Let me produce the state of sleep as a most evident demonstration of the truth of what I say; wherein souls, when the body does not distract them, have the sweetest rest depending on themselves, and conversing with God, by their alliance to him; they then go everywhere, and foretell many futurities beforehand.
12. Mishnah, Berachot, 5.5 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.5. One who is praying and makes a mistake, it is a bad sign for him. And if he is the messenger of the congregation (the prayer leader) it is a bad sign for those who have sent him, because one’s messenger is equivalent to one’s self. They said about Rabbi Hanina ben Dosa that he used to pray for the sick and say, “This one will die, this one will live.” They said to him: “How do you know?” He replied: “If my prayer comes out fluently, I know that he is accepted, but if not, then I know that he is rejected.”"
13. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.12. Now if Christ is preached, that he has been raised from thedead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of thedead?
14. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. Paul, Silvanus, and Timothy, to the assembly of the Thessalonians in God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.
15. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 5.1-5.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. New Testament, Galatians, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. Paul, an apostle (not from men, neither through man, but through Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead)
17. New Testament, Philippians, 1.23, 3.10-3.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.23. But I am in a dilemma between the two, having the desire to depart and be with Christ, which is far better. 3.10. that I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, becoming conformed to his death; 3.11. if by any means I may attain to the resurrection from the dead.
18. New Testament, Romans, 6.1-6.11, 10.9, 14.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.1. What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? 6.2. May it never be! We who died to sin, how could we live in it any longer? 6.3. Or don't you know that all we who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? 6.4. We were buried therefore with him through baptism to death, that just like Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life. 6.5. For if we have become united with him in the likeness of his death, we will also be part of his resurrection; 6.6. knowing this, that our old man was crucified with him, that the body of sin might be done away with, so that we would no longer be in bondage to sin. 6.7. For he who has died has been freed from sin. 6.8. But if we died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him; 6.9. knowing that Christ, being raised from the dead, dies no more. Death no more has dominion over him! 6.10. For the death that he died, he died to sin one time; but the life that he lives, he lives to God. 6.11. Thus also consider yourselves also to be dead to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus our Lord. 10.9. that if you will confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus, and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. 14.9. For to this end Christ died, rose, and lived again, that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living.
19. New Testament, Matthew, 27.52 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27.52. The tombs were opened, and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised;
20. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.6.1, 1.23, 1.23.5, 2.29.3, 2.31.2, 4.16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.23. But Hesiod the poet asserts himself also that he thus heard from the Muses concerning nature, and that the Muses are the daughters of Jupiter. For when for nine nights and days together, Jupiter, through excess of passion, had uninterruptedly lain with Mnemosyne, that Mnemosyne conceived in one womb those nine Muses, becoming pregt with one during each night. Having then summoned the nine Muses from Pieria, that is, Olympus, he exhorted them to undergo instruction:- How first both gods and earth were made, And rivers, and boundless deep, and ocean's surge, And glittering stars, and spacious heaven above; How they grasped the crown and shared the glory, And how at first they held the many-valed Olympus. These (truths), you Muses, tell me of, says he, From first, and next which of them first arose. Chaos, no doubt, the very first, arose; but next Wide-stretching Earth, ever the throne secure of all Immortals, who hold the peaks of white Olympus; And breezy Tartarus in wide earth's recess; And Love, who is most beauteous of the gods immortal, Chasing care away from all the gods and men, Quells in breasts the mind and counsel sage. But Erebus from Chaos and gloomy Night arose; And, in turn, from Night both Air and Day were born; But primal Earth, equal to self in truth begot The stormy sky to veil it round on every side, Ever to be for happy gods a throne secure. And forth she brought the towering hills, the pleasant haunts of nymphs who dwell throughout the woody heights. And also barren Sea begot the surge-tossed Flood, apart from luscious Love; but next Embracing Heaven, she Ocean bred with eddies deep, And Caeus, and Crius, and Hyperian, and Iapetus, And Thia, and Rhea, and Themis, and Mnemosyne, And gold-crowned Phoebe, and comely Tethys. But after these was born last fittest for bearing arms" (for service, as we say).}-- the wiley Cronus, Fiercest of sons; but he abhorred his blooming sire, And in turn the Cyclops bred, who owned a savage breast. And all the rest of the giants from Cronus, Hesiod enumerates, and somewhere afterwards that Jupiter was born of Rhea. All these, then, made the foregoing statements in their doctrine regarding both the nature and generation of the universe. But all, sinking below what is divine, busied themselves concerning the substance of existing things, being astonished at the magnitude of creation, and supposing that it constituted the Deity, each speculator selecting in preference a different portion of the world; failing, however, to discern the God and maker of these. The opinions, therefore, of those who have attempted to frame systems of philosophy among the Greeks, I consider that we have sufficiently explained; and from these the heretics, taking occasion, have endeavoured to establish the tenets that will be after a short time declared. It seems, however, expedient, that first explaining the mystical rites and whatever imaginary doctrines some have laboriously framed concerning the stars, or magnitudes, to declare these; for heretics likewise, taking occasion from them, are considered by the multitude to utter prodigies. Next in order we shall elucidate the feeble opinions advanced by these. Books 2 and 3 are wanting.
21. Justin, First Apology, 26.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 19.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Tertullian, Against Marcion, 1.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.2. The heretic of Pontus introduces two Gods, like the twin Symplegades of his own shipwreck: One whom it was impossible to deny, i.e. our Creator; and one whom he will never be able to prove, i.e. his own god. The unhappy man gained the first idea of his conceit from the simple passage of our Lord's saying, which has reference to human beings and not divine ones, wherein He disposes of those examples of a good tree and a corrupt one; how that the good tree brings not forth corrupt fruit, neither the corrupt tree good fruit. Which means, that an honest mind and good faith cannot produce evil deeds, any more than an evil disposition can produce good deeds. Now (like many other persons now-a-days, especially those who have an heretical proclivity), while morbidly brooding over the question of the origin of evil, his perception became blunted by the very irregularity of his researches; and when he found the Creator declaring, I am He that creates evil, Isaiah 45:7 inasmuch as he had already concluded from other arguments, which are satisfactory to every perverted mind, that God is the author of evil, so he now applied to the Creator the figure of the corrupt tree bringing forth evil fruit, that is, moral evil, and then presumed that there ought to be another god, after the analogy of the good tree producing its good fruit. Accordingly, finding in Christ a different disposition, as it were - one of a simple and pure benevolence - differing from the Creator, he readily argued that in his Christ had been revealed a new and strange divinity; and then with a little leaven he leavened the whole lump of the faith, flavouring it with the acidity of his own heresy. He had, moreover, in one Cerdon an abettor of this blasphemy - a circumstance which made them the more readily think that they saw most clearly their two gods, blind though they were; for, in truth, they had not seen the one God with soundness of faith. To men of diseased vision even one lamp looks like many. One of his gods, therefore, whom he was obliged to acknowledge, he destroyed by defaming his attributes in the matter of evil; the other, whom he laboured so hard to devise, he constructed, laying his foundation in the principle of good. In what articles he arranged these natures, we show by our own refutations of them.
24. Tertullian, On The Soul, 47.1-47.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

25. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 7, 33 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Iamblichus, Concerning The Mysteries, 3.1-3.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

27. Lactantius, Deaths of The Persecutors, 2.8 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

28. Nag Hammadi, Apocalypse of Peter, 2.11-2.13 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

29. Anon., Apocalypse of Peter, 2.11-2.13



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ambiguity, ambiguous Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
angel Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74
angels, made the world Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
angels Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
anti-christ Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
antichrist Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74
apocalyptic Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
aristotle Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
artemidorus Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
assumption Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
baptism Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52, 100; Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
bible Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
birth Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
blood Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
body Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15; Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
bread Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
christ Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
christian Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
cicero Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
circumcision Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74
council of nicaea Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74
covenant Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
creator Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
cross Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
daemon, daemonic Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
death Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52, 100; Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
democritus Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
dölger, f.j. Pinheiro et al., The Ancient Novel and Early Christian and Jewish Narrative: Fictional Intersections (2012b) 191
elijah Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74; Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
encounter Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
enigma, enigmatic Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
enoch Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74; Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
eschatology Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
galen Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
greek language Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74
hell Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
hippocrates Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
hippolytus Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
homer Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
homonymy, immortality Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52, 100
hope Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
idolatry/idol/image Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
jerusalem Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
jesus Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74
just Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
king Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
law Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
lucretius Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
magic/sorcery Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
marcion Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
mary Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
menander Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52, 100; Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
messiah Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
moses Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
mysteryies, gnostic rite Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
neoplatonic Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
passio perpetuae, vision of saturus Pinheiro et al., The Ancient Novel and Early Christian and Jewish Narrative: Fictional Intersections (2012b) 191
patristics\t Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
peter Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
peter (apostle) Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
pharisees Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
philo\t Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
philosopher, philosophical Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
plato Dunderberg, Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus (2008) 219; Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
portrayal in acts, reception of Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52
power Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
priesthood Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
prophecy Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
prophets Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
rabbis Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
resurrection, as removal of ignorance about god Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52
resurrection, as separation of body from soul Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52
resurrection, competing definitions of Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52, 100
resurrection, nature of (relationship to embodiment) Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
resurrection, principle of continuity Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
resurrection, purpose of Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
resurrection, timing of Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
rousseau, a. Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52
sadducees Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100; Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
salvation Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
samaritans Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
simon Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52
simon magus Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
soul, definition of Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52
soul Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
suffering Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
supernatural being, simon/meder a power of god Williams, Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46) (2009) 68
synesius Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
tertullian, deceptiveness of Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
tertullian, theodicy Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
tertullian Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100; Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
torah Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
tradition Roskovec and Hušek, Interactions in Interpretation: The Pilgrimage of Meaning through Biblical Texts and Contexts (2021) 15
transformation Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
twelve Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
valentinians Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 52; Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
visions Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
waszink, j. Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 100
witnesses Poorthuis and Schwartz, Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity (2014) 106
women' Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
zoroastrianism Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 34
– in christian tradition Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74
– reward for Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 74