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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10600
Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 33.1
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16 results
1. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 18.65-18.85 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18.65. 4. About the same time also another sad calamity put the Jews into disorder, and certain shameful practices happened about the temple of Isis that was at Rome. I will now first take notice of the wicked attempt about the temple of Isis, and will then give an account of the Jewish affairs. 18.66. There was at Rome a woman whose name was Paulina; one who, on account of the dignity of her ancestors, and by the regular conduct of a virtuous life, had a great reputation: she was also very rich; and although she was of a beautiful countece, and in that flower of her age wherein women are the most gay, yet did she lead a life of great modesty. She was married to Saturninus, one that was every way answerable to her in an excellent character. 18.67. Decius Mundus fell in love with this woman, who was a man very high in the equestrian order; and as she was of too great dignity to be caught by presents, and had already rejected them, though they had been sent in great abundance, he was still more inflamed with love to her, insomuch that he promised to give her two hundred thousand Attic drachmae for one night’s lodging; 18.68. and when this would not prevail upon her, and he was not able to bear this misfortune in his amours, he thought it the best way to famish himself to death for want of food, on account of Paulina’s sad refusal; and he determined with himself to die after such a manner, and he went on with his purpose accordingly. 18.69. Now Mundus had a freed-woman, who had been made free by his father, whose name was Ide, one skillful in all sorts of mischief. This woman was very much grieved at the young man’s resolution to kill himself, (for he did not conceal his intentions to destroy himself from others,) and came to him, and encouraged him by her discourse, and made him to hope, by some promises she gave him, that he might obtain a night’s lodging with Paulina; 18.71. She went to some of Isis’s priests, and upon the strongest assurances [of concealment], she persuaded them by words, but chiefly by the offer of money, of twenty-five thousand drachmae in hand, and as much more when the thing had taken effect; and told them the passion of the young man, and persuaded them to use all means possible to beguile the woman. 18.72. So they were drawn in to promise so to do, by that large sum of gold they were to have. Accordingly, the oldest of them went immediately to Paulina; and upon his admittance, he desired to speak with her by herself. When that was granted him, he told her that he was sent by the god Anubis, who was fallen in love with her, and enjoined her to come to him. 18.73. Upon this she took the message very kindly, and valued herself greatly upon this condescension of Anubis, and told her husband that she had a message sent her, and was to sup and lie with Anubis; so he agreed to her acceptance of the offer, as fully satisfied with the chastity of his wife. 18.74. Accordingly, she went to the temple, and after she had supped there, and it was the hour to go to sleep, the priest shut the doors of the temple, when, in the holy part of it, the lights were also put out. Then did Mundus leap out, (for he was hidden therein,) and did not fail of enjoying her, who was at his service all the night long, as supposing he was the god; 18.75. and when he was gone away, which was before those priests who knew nothing of this stratagem were stirring, Paulina came early to her husband, and told him how the god Anubis had appeared to her. Among her friends, also, she declared how great a value she put upon this favor 18.76. who partly disbelieved the thing, when they reflected on its nature, and partly were amazed at it, as having no pretense for not believing it, when they considered the modesty and the dignity of the person. 18.77. But now, on the third day after what had been done, Mundus met Paulina, and said, “Nay, Paulina, thou hast saved me two hundred thousand drachmae, which sum thou sightest have added to thy own family; yet hast thou not failed to be at my service in the manner I invited thee. As for the reproaches thou hast laid upon Mundus, I value not the business of names; but I rejoice in the pleasure I reaped by what I did, while I took to myself the name of Anubis.” 18.78. When he had said this, he went his way. But now she began to come to the sense of the grossness of what she had done, and rent her garments, and told her husband of the horrid nature of this wicked contrivance, and prayed him not to neglect to assist her in this case. So he discovered the fact to the emperor; 18.79. whereupon Tiberius inquired into the matter thoroughly by examining the priests about it, and ordered them to be crucified, as well as Ide, who was the occasion of their perdition, and who had contrived the whole matter, which was so injurious to the woman. He also demolished the temple of Isis, and gave order that her statue should be thrown into the river Tiber; 18.81. 5. There was a man who was a Jew, but had been driven away from his own country by an accusation laid against him for transgressing their laws, and by the fear he was under of punishment for the same; but in all respects a wicked man. He, then living at Rome, professed to instruct men in the wisdom of the laws of Moses. 18.82. He procured also three other men, entirely of the same character with himself, to be his partners. These men persuaded Fulvia, a woman of great dignity, and one that had embraced the Jewish religion, to send purple and gold to the temple at Jerusalem; and when they had gotten them, they employed them for their own uses, and spent the money themselves, on which account it was that they at first required it of her. 18.83. Whereupon Tiberius, who had been informed of the thing by Saturninus, the husband of Fulvia, who desired inquiry might be made about it, ordered all the Jews to be banished out of Rome; 18.84. at which time the consuls listed four thousand men out of them, and sent them to the island Sardinia; but punished a greater number of them, who were unwilling to become soldiers, on account of keeping the laws of their forefathers. Thus were these Jews banished out of the city by the wickedness of four men. 18.85. 1. But the nation of the Samaritans did not escape without tumults. The man who excited them to it was one who thought lying a thing of little consequence, and who contrived every thing so that the multitude might be pleased; so he bid them to get together upon Mount Gerizzim, which is by them looked upon as the most holy of all mountains, and assured them, that when they were come thither, he would show them those sacred vessels which were laid under that place, because Moses put them there.
2. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.1. So let a man think of us as Christ's servants, and stewards ofGod's mysteries.
3. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 3.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.15. but if I wait long, that you may know how men ought to behave themselves in the house of God, which is the assembly of the living God, the pillar and ground of the truth.
4. New Testament, Ephesians, 2.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.19. So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints, and of the household of God
5. New Testament, Hebrews, 3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.6. but Christ is faithful as a Son over his house; whose house we are, if we hold fast our confidence and the glorying of our hope firm to the end.
6. New Testament, Titus, 1.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.7. For the overseer must be blameless, as God's steward; not self-pleasing, not easily angered, not given to wine, not violent, not greedy for dishonest gain;
7. Suetonius, Tiberius, 36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Annals, 2.85 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.85.  In the same year, bounds were set to female profligacy by stringent resolutions of the senate; and it was laid down that no woman should trade in her body, if her father, grandfather, or husband had been a Roman knight. For Vistilia, the daughter of a praetorian family, had advertised her venality on the aediles' list — the normal procedure among our ancestors, who imagined the unchaste to be sufficiently punished by the avowal of their infamy. Her husband, Titidius Labeo, was also required to explain why, in view of his wife's manifest guilt, he had not invoked the penalty of the law. As he pleaded that sixty days, not yet elapsed, were allowed for deliberation, it was thought enough to pass sentence on Vistilia, who was removed to the island of Seriphos. — Another debate dealt with the proscription of the Egyptian and Jewish rites, and a senatorial edict directed that four thousand descendants of enfranchised slaves, tainted with that superstition and suitable in point of age, were to be shipped to Sardinia and there employed in suppressing brigandage: "if they succumbed to the pestilential climate, it was a cheap loss." The rest had orders to leave Italy, unless they had renounced their impious ceremonial by a given date.
9. Anon., Acts of Paul, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 7.6.33.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.28.1, 2.14.5, 2.26, 3.23.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Justin, Second Apology, 12.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 3 (2nd cent. CE

14. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 8.2, 12.5, 12.10, 18.6, 19.2, 32.1, 42.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Anon., The Acts of Paul And Thecla, 38-40, 7, 9, 34 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

16. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.25, 3.44 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.25. And perhaps there is a danger as great as that which degrades the name of God, or of the Good, to improper objects, in changing the name of God according to a secret system, and applying those which belong to inferior beings to greater, and vice versa. And I do not dwell on this, that when the name of Zeus is uttered, there is heard at the same time that of the son of Kronos and Rhea, and the husband of Hera, and brother of Poseidon, and father of Athene, and Artemis, who was guilty of incest with his own daughter Persephone; or that Apollo immediately suggests the son of Leto and Zeus, and the brother of Artemis, and half-brother of Hermes; and so with all the other names invented by these wise men of Celsus, who are the parents of these opinions, and the ancient theologians of the Greeks. For what are the grounds for deciding that he should on the one hand be properly called Zeus, and yet on the other should not have Kronos for his father and Rhea for his mother? And the same argument applies to all the others that are called gods. But this charge does not at all apply to those who, for some mysterious reason, refer the word Sabaoth, or Adonai, or any of the other names to the (true) God. And when one is able to philosophize about the mystery of names, he will find much to say respecting the titles of the angels of God, of whom one is called Michael, and another Gabriel, and another Raphael, appropriately to the duties which they discharge in the world, according to the will of the God of all things. And a similar philosophy of names applies also to our Jesus, whose name has already been seen, in an unmistakeable manner, to have expelled myriads of evil spirits from the souls and bodies (of men), so great was the power which it exerted upon those from whom the spirits were driven out. And while still upon the subject of names, we have to mention that those who are skilled in the use of incantations, relate that the utterance of the same incantation in its proper language can accomplish what the spell professes to do; but when translated into any other tongue, it is observed to become inefficacious and feeble. And thus it is not the things signified, but the qualities and peculiarities of words, which possess a certain power for this or that purpose. And so on such grounds as these we defend the conduct of the Christians, when they struggle even to death to avoid calling God by the name of Zeus, or to give Him a name from any other language. For they either use the common name - God - indefinitely, or with some such addition as that of the Maker of all things, the Creator of heaven and earth - He who sent down to the human race those good men, to whose names that of God being added, certain mighty works are wrought among men. And much more besides might be said on the subject of names, against those who think that we ought to be indifferent as to our use of them. And if the remark of Plato in the Philebus should surprise us, when he says, My fear, O Protagoras, about the names of the gods is no small one, seeing Philebus in his discussion with Socrates had called pleasure a god, how shall we not rather approve the piety of the Christians, who apply none of the names used in the mythologies to the Creator of the world? And now enough on this subject for the present. 3.44. After these points Celsus quotes some objections against the doctrine of Jesus, made by a very few individuals who are considered Christians, not of the more intelligent, as he supposes, but of the more ignorant class, and asserts that the following are the rules laid down by them. Let no one come to us who has been instructed, or who is wise or prudent (for such qualifications are deemed evil by us); but if there be any ignorant, or unintelligent, or uninstructed, or foolish persons, let them come with confidence. By which words, acknowledging that such individuals are worthy of their God, they manifestly show that they desire and are able to gain over only the silly, and the mean, and the stupid, with women and children. In reply to which, we say that, as if, while Jesus teaches continence, and says, Whosoever looks upon a woman to lust after her, has already committed adultery with her in his heart, one were to behold a few of those who are deemed to be Christians living licentiously, he would most justly blame them for living contrary to the teaching of Jesus, but would act most unreasonably if he were to charge the Gospel with their censurable conduct; so, if he found nevertheless that the doctrine of the Christians invites men to wisdom, the blame then must remain with those who rest in their own ignorance, and who utter, not what Celsus relates (for although some of them are simple and ignorant, they do not speak so shamelessly as he alleges), but other things of much less serious import, which, however, serve to turn aside men from the practice of wisdom.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of paul and thecla, falconilla Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 191
acts of paul and thecla, tryphaena Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 191
aelius aristides Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 57
aesop Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
aged, the Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
alban mountains Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
apocryphal acts, conversion Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 191
artemis Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
asclepius, laudatory speeches offered to Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 57
assembling Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
barbarians, conceptions of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
care of the poor Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
christian/ity, and (upper class) women Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 37
christian/ity, divides families Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 23
christian/ity, family aspects Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 23
christian/ity, social capital Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 23
christian/ity, young Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 23, 191
conflict Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
cosmos, cosmology, nature Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289, 427
crescens Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 61
cults Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
cynics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
demons, tatian on Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 57
diatribe Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
educated, erudite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289, 427
equality of rights Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
ethics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
health, medicine, and philosophy in school of justin martyr, pseudo-justin Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 61
health, medicine, and philosophy in school of justin martyr, tatian Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 57, 61
health, medicine, and philosophy in school of justin martyr Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 57, 61
heretics {see also gnostics; marcionites) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
hermas Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
historiography Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
homer Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
house, possession of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
humiliores Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
india Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
integration Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
irenaeus of lyons, sexual licence attributed to heresiologists by Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 61
isis Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
magic, magic papyri Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
marcion Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
megasthenes Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
mythology Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
numenios Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
paideia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
philosophy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
platonism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289, 427
popular philosophy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
possessions, wealth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
provincials, immigrants Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
pseudo-justin, on health, medicine, and philosophy Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 61
pythagoreans Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
rhodon Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
sacrifices Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
sex/sexuality, pseudo-justin on Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 61
sex/sexuality, tatian on Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 61
social advancement Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
social decline Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
socially elevated Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
soul Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
stratification, social Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
tatian, on health, medicine, and philosophy Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 57, 61
tatian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289, 427
teaching/tutoring, christian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 289
temple Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427
vegetarianism Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 61
women Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
worldliness Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 99
zeus (keraunios)' Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 427