Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10600
Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 10.1
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.23.7, 5.75.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.23.7.  And since he had become conversant with the teachings of the Egyptians about the gods, he transferred the birth of the ancient Osiris to more recent times, and, out of regard for the descendants of Cadmus, instituted a new initiation, in the ritual of which the initiates were given the account that Dionysus had been born of Semelê and Zeus. And the people observed these initiatory rites, partly because they were deceived through their ignorance, partly because they were attracted to them by the trustworthiness of Orpheus and his reputation in such matters, and most of all because they were glad to receive the god as a Greek, which, as has been said, is what he was considered to be. 5.75.4.  As for Dionysus, the myths state that he discovered the vine and its cultivation, and also how to make wine and to store away many of the autumn fruits and thus to provide mankind with the use of them as food over a long time. This god was born in Crete, men say, of Zeus and Persephonê, and Orpheus has handed down the tradition in the initiatory rites that he was torn in pieces by the Titans. And the fact is that there have been several who bore the name Dionysus, regarding whom we have given a detailed account at greater length in connection with the more appropriate period of time.
2. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.114 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 20.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. If the absurdity of their theology were confined to saying that the gods were created, and owed their constitution to water, since I have demonstrated that nothing is made which is not also liable to dissolution, I might proceed to the remaining charges. But, on the one hand, they have described their bodily forms: speaking of Hercules, for instance, as a god in the shape of a dragon coiled up; of others as hundred-handed; of the daughter of Zeus, whom he begot of his mother Rhea; or of Demeter, as having two eyes in the natural order, and two in her forehead, and the face of an animal on the back part of her neck, and as having also horns, so that Rhea, frightened at her monster of a child, fled from her, and did not give her the breast (θηλή), whence mystically she is called Athêlâ, but commonly Phersephoné and Koré, though she is not the same as Athênâ, who is called Koré from the pupil of the eye - and, on the other hand, they have described their admirable achievements, as they deem them: how Kronos, for instance, mutilated his father, and hurled him down from his chariot, and how he murdered his children, and swallowed the males of them; and how Zeus bound his father, and cast him down to Tartarus, as did Ouranos also to his sons, and fought with the Titans for the government; and how he persecuted his mother Rhea when she refused to wed him, and, she becoming a she-dragon, and he himself being changed into a dragon, bound her with what is called the Herculean knot, and accomplished his purpose, of which fact the rod of Hermes is a symbol; and again, how he violated his daughter Phersephoné, in this case also assuming the form of a dragon, and became the father of Dionysus. In face of narrations like these, I must say at least this much, What that is becoming or useful is there in such a history, that we must believe Kronos, Zeus, Koré, and the rest, to be gods? Is it the descriptions of their bodies? Why, what man of judgment and reflection will believe that a viper was begotten by a god (thus Orpheus: - But from the sacred womb Phanes begot Another offspring, horrible and fierce, In sight a frightful viper, on whose head Were hairs: its face was comely; but the rest, From the neck downwards, bore the aspect dire of a dread dragon ); or who will admit that Phanes himself, being a first-born god (for he it was that was produced from the egg), has the body or shape of a dragon, or was swallowed by Zeus, that Zeus might be too large to be contained? For if they differ in no respect from the lowest brutes (since it is evident that the Deity must differ from the things of earth and those that are derived from matter), they are not gods. How, then, I ask, can we approach them as suppliants, when their origin resembles that of cattle, and they themselves have the form of brutes, and are ugly to behold?
4. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.16.1-2.16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 5.20.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 4.31.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.31.4. On the road from Thuria towards Arcadia are the springs of the Pamisus, at which little children find cures. A road turns to the left from the springs, and after some forty stades is the city of the Messenians under Ithome . It is enclosed not only by Mount Ithome, but on the side towards the Pamisos by Mount Eva. The mountain is said to have obtained its name from the fact that the Bacchic cry of “Evoe” was first uttered here by Dionysus and his attendant women.
7. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 8.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.21 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

9. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 5.565, 6.155-6.157 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

10. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 578, 87, 89, 398

11. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 30.6-30.7

12. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 5.10, 20.2, 22.12, 26.9



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexandria deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
death of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
derveni papyrus, first columns Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
derveni papyrus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170
destiny, of souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
dionysus, birth of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170, 276
eleusis deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170
etymologies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 276
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
hieronymus and hellanicus, (theogony) deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170, 276
initiates, hope of the initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
knowledge, acquired in the initiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
maenadism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 276
mystery cults Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orphic myths Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orphic rites Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
persephone Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
persephone / core deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170
persephones birth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
rhapsodies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
stoicism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170
theogonies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170, 276
titan's crime" '328.0_137.0@δρώμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 170, 276
zeus incest with his mother Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
λεγόμενα' Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137