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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10591
Tacitus, Histories, 1.4.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Polybius, Histories, 2.56.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.56.10.  A historical author should not try to thrill his readers by such exaggerated pictures, nor should he, like a tragic poet, try to imagine the probable utterances of his characters or reckon up all the consequences probably incidental to the occurrences with which he deals, but simply record what really happened and what really was said, however commonplace.
2. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 8.3.68 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.3.68.  But if we expand all that the one word "stormed" includes, we shall see the flames pouring from house and temple, and hear the crash of falling roofs and one confused clamour blent of many cries: we shall behold some in doubt whither to fly, others clinging to their nearest and dearest in one last embrace, while the wailing of women and children and the laments of old men that the cruelty of fate should have spared them to see that day will strike upon our ears.
3. Tacitus, Annals, 4.31 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.31.  The round of tragedies was broken by a relatively cheerful interlude when the emperor spared Gaius Cominius, a Roman knight convicted of a poetical lampoon upon himself, as a concession to the prayers of his brother, a member of the senate. The fact heightened the general wonder that, cognizant as he was of better things and of the fame that attended mercy, he should still prefer the darker road. For neither did he err by thoughtlessness; nor, indeed, is it difficult to divine when the acts of emperors are applauded with sincerity and when with feigned enthusiasm. Moreover, he himself, otherwise an artificial speaker whose every word had apparently to struggle for utterance, spoke out with more fluency and promptness whenever he spoke in charity. On the other hand, when Publius Suillius, an old quaestor of Germanicus, was about to escape with banishment from Italy after being convicted of judicial corruption, he moved for his deportation to an island, with so much earnestness as to make a declaration on oath that the change was demanded by national interests. His intervention, severely criticized at the time, redounded before long to his credit: for Suillius returned, and the succeeding generation viewed him in the plenitude of power, the venal favourite of Claudius, exploiting the imperial friendship long profitably, never well. The same penalty was invoked upon Firmius Catus, a member of the senate, for laying a false charge of treason against his sister. Catus, as I have said, had laid the trap for Libo and afterwards destroyed him by his evidence. In the recollection of that service, Tiberius, though producing other reasons, now procured a remission of his banishment: to his ejection from the senate he raised no hindrance.
4. Tacitus, Histories, 1.4.2, 1.5, 3.51.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
anticipation Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
cassius dio Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
causes Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
disaster Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
exempla, role in roman culture Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 60
explanation Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
galba Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 221
hope, as a collective emotion Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 221
livy (t. livius) Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 59
memoria, recens vs. vetus' Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 60
memoria, roman historians use of Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 59, 60
memory Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 221
polybius Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
quintilian Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
rome/romans Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
rüsen, jörn, sallust (l. sallustius crispus) Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 59, 60
suetonius Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
syme, sir ronald Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 59
tacitus, p. cornelius Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 59, 60
tiberius, emperor Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 59
urbs capta Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 367
white, hayden Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 59