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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10591
Tacitus, Histories, 1.32.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 4.3-4.39 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Tacitus, Annals, 1.54.2, 4.14.3, 13.24.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13.24.1.  At the end of the year, the cohort usually present on guard at the Games was withdrawn; the objects being to give a greater appearance of liberty, to prevent the troops from being corrupted by too close contact with the licence of the theatre, and to test whether the populace would continue its orderly behaviour when its custodians were removed. A lustration of the city was carried out by the emperor at the recommendation of the soothsayers, since the temples of Jupiter and Minerva had been struck by lightning.
3. Tacitus, Histories, 2.91.2, 3.67-3.68 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.67.  Vitellius's ears were deaf to all sterner counsels. His mind was overwhelmed by pity and anxiety for his wife and children, since he feared that if he made an obstinate struggle, he might leave the victor less mercifully disposed toward them. He had also his mother, who was bowed with years; but through an opportune death she anticipated by a few days the destruction of her house, having gained nothing from the elevation of her son to the principate but sorrow and good repute. On December eighteenth, when Vitellius heard of the defection of the legion and cohorts that had given themselves up at Narnia, he put on mourning and came down from his palace, surrounded by his household in tears; his little son was carried in a litter as if in a funeral procession. The voices of the people were flattering and untimely; the soldiers maintained an ominous silence. 3.68.  There was no one so indifferent to human fortunes as not to be moved by the sight. Here was a Roman emperor who, but yesterday lord of all mankind, now, abandoning the seat of his high fortune, was going through the midst of his people and the heart of the city to give up his imperial power. Men had never seen or heard the like before. A sudden violent act had crushed the dictator Caesar, a secret plot the emperor Gaius; night and the obscurity of the country had concealed the flight of Nero; Piso and Galba had fallen, so to say, on the field of battle. But now Vitellius, in an assembly called by himself, surrounded by his own soldiers, while even women looked on, spoke briefly and in a manner befitting his present sad estate, saying that he withdrew for the sake of peace and his country; he asked the people simply to remember him and to have pity on his brother, his wife, and his innocent young children. As he spoke, he held out his young son in his arms, commending him now to one or another, again to the whole assembly; finally, when tears choked his voice, taking his dagger from his side he offered it to the consul who stood beside him, as if surrendering his power of life and death over the citizens. The consul's name was Caecilius Simplex. When he refused it and the assembled people cried out in protest, Vitellius left them with the intention of depositing the imperial insignia in the Temple of Concord and after that going to his brother's home. Thereupon the people with louder cries opposed his going to a private house, but called him to the palace. Every other path was blocked against him; the only road open was along the Sacred Way. Then in utter perplexity he returned to the palace.
4. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Pescennius Niger, 1.1 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
charisma, imperial ideology and Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 30
cicero Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
consensus, as principle of governance Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 30
consensus Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 30
cremona Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186
forum Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186
imperial office Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 30
nero Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
otho Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186
palatium Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186
pliny the younger Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
populus romanus' Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 30
roman entertainment, as distraction from torah Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
roman entertainment, pagan critiques Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
scorners, sitting with Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
seneca Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
servius galba Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186
sphacteria Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186
tacitus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186; Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
thucydides Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186
torah, opposite spectacle Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
tosefta Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 176
vitellius Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 186